Resultados totales (Incluyendo duplicados): 33743
Encontrada(s) 3375 página(s)
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/285944
Dataset. 2022

DATA FROM PATI CIENTIFIC 2022-01-26 TD-4

  • Carrasco, Oriol
  • Bardají, Raúl
  • Vallès Casanova, Ignasi Berenguer
  • Pelegrí, Josep Lluís
  • Hoareau, Nina
  • Salvador, Joaquín
  • Simon, Carine
  • Rodero García, Carlos
  • Piera, Jaume
  • Ortigosa Barragán, Inma
  • Mateu, Jordi
  • Castells-Sanabra, Marcel·la
  • Barberan, Victor
  • González Fernández, Óscar
  • Puigdefàbregas, Joan
  • Yannoukakou, Iphygenia
  • Carretero, Igor
  • Verger, Elisabet
Sea temperature vs depth measured by the Pati Cientific at Somorrostro, Barcelona, on 2022-01-26. Project: Patí Científic, Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/285944
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/285944
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/285944
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/285944
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/285944
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/285944
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/285944
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/285944

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286137
Dataset. 2022

RESILIENCE OF SEAGRASS POPULATIONS TO THERMAL STRESS DOES NOT REFLECT REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN OCEAN CLIMATE

  • Bennett, Scott
  • Alcoverro, Teresa
  • Kletou, Demetris
  • Antoniou, Charalampos
  • Boada, Jordi
  • Buñuel, Xavier
  • Cucala, Lidia
  • Jordá, Gabriel
  • Kleitou, Periklis
  • Roca, Guillem
  • Santana Garçon, Julia
  • Savva, Ioannis
  • Vergés, Adriana
  • Marbà, Núria
[Methods] Experiment locations and climate Trans-Mediterranean translocation of Posidonia oceanica fragments took place between Catalunya (Spain), Mallorca (Spain) and Cyprus in July 2018 and were monitored until July 2019 (Fig. 1). Sea surface temperature data for each transplant site were based on daily SST maps with a spatial resolution of 1/4°, obtained from the National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI, https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oisst ) (Reynolds et al. 2007). These maps have been generated through the optimal interpolation of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data for the period 1981-2019. Underwater temperature loggers (ONSET Hobo pro v2 Data logger) were deployed at the transplant sites in Catalunya, Mallorca and Cyprus and recorded hourly temperatures throughout the duration of the experiment (one year). In order to obtain an extended time series of temperature at transplant sites, a calibration procedure was performed comparing logger data with sea surface temperature from the nearest point on SST maps. In particular, SST data were linearly fitted to logger data for the common period. Then, the calibration coefficients were applied to the whole SST time series to obtain corrected-SST data and reconstruct daily habitat temperatures from 1981-2019. Local climate data was also compared to the global thermal distribution of P. oceanica to assess how representative experimental sites were of the thermal distribution of the species (Supplementary materials). Collectively, seawater temperatures from the three locations span the 16th - 99th percentile of temperatures observed across the global thermal distribution of P. oceanica. As such Catalunya, Mallorca and Cyprus are herein considered to represent the cool-edge, centre and warm-edge of P. oceanica distribution, respectively. Transplantation took place toward warmer climates and procedural controls were conducted within each source location, resulting in six source-to-recipient combinations (i.e. treatments, Fig. 1). Initial collection of P. oceanica, handling and transplantation was carried out simultaneously by coordinated teams in July 2018 (Table S1). Each recipient location was subsequently resampled four times over the course of the experiment, in August/September 2018 (T1), October 2018 (T2), April 2019 (T3) and May/June 2019 (T4, Table S1). Between 60-100 fragments were collected for each treatment. A fragment was defined as a section of P. oceanica containing one apical shoot connected with approximately five vertical shoots by approximately 10-15 cm of rhizome with intact roots. Collection occurred at two sites within each location, separated by approximately 1 km. Within sites, collections were conducted between 4 – 5 m depth and were spaced across the meadow to minimise the dominance of a single clone and damage to the meadow. Upon collection, fragments were transported for up to one hour back to the nearest laboratory in shaded seawater. Handling methods In the laboratory, fragments were placed into holding tanks with aerated seawater, at ambient temperature and a 14:10 light-dark cycle. All shoots were clipped to 25 cm length (from meristem to the tip of the longest leaves), to standardise initial conditions and reduce biomass for transportation. For transport by plane or ferry between locations, fragments were packed in layers within cool-boxes. Each layer was separated by frozen cool-packs wrapped in wet tea towels (rinsed in sea water). All fragments spent 12 hrs inside a cool-box irrespective of their recipient destination, including procedural controls (i.e. cool-cool, centre-centre and warm-warm) to simulate the transit times of the plants travelling furthest from their source location (Fig. 1a). On arrival at the destination, fragments were placed in holding tanks with aerated seawater at ambient temperature as described above in their recipient location for 48 hrs, prior to field transplantation. Measurement methods One day prior to transplantation, fragments were tagged with a unique number and attached to U-shaped peg with cable-ties. Morphological traits for each fragment were measured and included: 1) length of the longest apical leaf, width and number of leaves 2) total number of bite marks on leaves of three vertical shoots per fragment, 3) number of vertical shoots, 4) leaf count of three vertical shoots per fragment and 5) overall horizontal rhizome length. A subset (n=10) of fragments per treatment were marked prior transplantation to measure shoot growth. To do this, all shoots within a single fragment were pierced using a hypodermic needle. Two holes were pierced side-by-side at the base of the leaf/top of the meristem. Transplant methods All transplant sites were located in 4 – 5 m depth in area of open dead-matte, surrounded by P. oceanica meadow. In Mallorca and Cyprus, fragments were distributed between two sites, separated by approximately 1 km. In Catalunya, a lack of suitable dead matte habitat, meant that all fragments were placed in one site. Fragments were planted along parallel transects at 50 cm intervals and with a 50 cm gap between parallel transects (Fig. S1). Different treatments were mixed and deployed haphazardly along each transect. Resampling methods and herbivory On day 10 of the experiment, a severe herbivory event was recorded at both warm-edge translocation sites. Scaled photos of all fragments were taken at this time to record the effects of herbivory on transplants. At the end of each main sampling period (T0 – T1, T1-T2 and T3 – T4), all pierced fragments were collected and taken back to the laboratory to measure shoot growth. At T1, T2 and T3, additional sets of fragments (n = 10 per treatment) were marked using the piercing method to record growth in the subsequent time period. In addition, at T1 and T3, n = 20 shoots within the natural meadow at each site were marked to compare growth rates between the native meadow and transplants. Underwater shoot counts and a scaled photo was taken to record fragment survivorship, shoot mortality, bite marks, and shoot length among all remaining fragments within each site and sampling time. In the laboratory, morphological measurements (described above) were repeated on the collected fragments and growth of transplant and natural meadow shoots was measured. Growth (shoot elongation, cm d-1) of the marked shoots was obtained by measuring the length from the base of meristem to marked holes of each leaf (new growth) of the shoot and dividing the leaf elongation per shoot by the marking period (in days). For each shoot, total leaf length (cm shoot-1) and the number of new leaves was also recorded. The rate of new leaf production (new leaves shoot-1 d-1) was estimated dividing the number of new leaves produced per shoot and the marking period. New growth was dried at 60 ºC for 48 hrs to determine carbon and nitrogen content of the leaves, and carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratios. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations in the new growth leaf tissue was measured at the beginning of the experiment and each subsequent time point for each treatment. Nutrient analyses were conducted at Unidade de Técnicas Instrumentais de Análise (University of Coruña, Spain) with an elemental analyser FlashEA112 (ThermoFinnigan). Underwater photos of shoots were analysed using ImageJ software (https://imagej.net). Maximum leaf length on each shoot in warm-edge transplant sites (cool-warm, centre-warm and warm-warm) were recorded for the initial (day 10) herbivore impact, T1, T2 and T3 time-points and related to transplant nutrient concentrations. Herbivore impact was estimated as the proportional change in length of the longest leaf relative to initial length at T0. Thermal stress Long term maximum temperatures were recorded as the average of annual maximum daily temperatures in each transplant site, averaged between years from 1981-2019. Maximum thermal anomalies were calculated as the difference between daily temperatures in a recipient site over the course of the experiment and the long-term maximum temperature in the source site for each corresponding population. ‘Heat stress’ and ‘recovery’ growth periods of the experiment were defined as T0 -T2 (July-October) and T2-T4 (November-June), respectively, corresponding to periods of positive and negative maximum thermal anomalies. Thermal anomalies experienced by the different transplant treatments were plotted using the ‘geom_flame’, function in the ‘HeatwavesR’ package (Schlegel & Smit 2018) of R (version 3.6.1, 2019) ., 1. The prevalence of local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity among populations is critical to accurately predicting when and where climate change impacts will occur. Currently, comparisons of thermal performance between populations are untested for most marine species or overlooked by models predicting the thermal sensitivity of species to extirpation. 2. Here we compared the ecological response and recovery of seagrass populations (Posidonia oceanica) to thermal stress throughout a year-long translocation experiment across a 2800 km gradient in ocean climate. Transplants in central and warm-edge locations experienced temperatures >29 ºC, representing thermal anomalies >5ºC above long-term maxima for cool-edge populations, 1.5ºC for central and <1ºC for warm-edge populations. 3. Cool, central and warm-edge populations differed in thermal performance when grown under common conditions, but patterns contrasted with expectations based on thermal geography. Cool-edge populations did not differ from warm-edge populations under common conditions and performed significantly better than central populations in growth and survival. 4. Our findings reveal that thermal performance does not necessarily reflect the thermal geography of a species. We demonstrate that warm-edge populations can be less sensitive to thermal stress than cooler, central populations suggesting that Mediterranean seagrasses have greater resilience to warming than current paradigms suggest., Australian Research Council, Award: DE200100900. Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, Award: 659246. Fundación BBVA., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: EC/H2020/659246
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286137
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286137
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286137
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286137
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286137
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286137
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286137
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286137

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286145
Dataset. 2021

LARGE-SCALE DRIVERS OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SOIL MICROBIAL PROPERTIES AND ORGANIC CARBON ACROSS EUROPE

  • Smith, Linnea C.
  • Orgiazzi, Alberto
  • Eisenhauer, Nico
  • Cesarz, Simone
  • Lochner, Alfred
  • Jones, Arwyn
  • Bastida, F.
  • Patoine, Guillaume
  • Reitz, Thomas
  • Buscot, François
  • Rillig, Matthias
  • Heintz-Buschart, Anna
  • Lehmann, Anika
  • Guerra, Carlos A.
[Methods] Soil samples were collected during the 2018 LUCAS soil sampling campaign. Soil chemical and physical properties were measured at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy (Orgiazzi et al., 2018). Soil microbial respiration and biomass, as well as water content and water holding capacity, were measured in the Eisenhauer lab of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research. Fungi/Bacteria was measured by fatty acid analysis by Felipe Bastida at CEBAS CSIC. Climate and geographical data were harvested from various databases, which are listed in Appendix 1 (data sources) of the associated paper. For more details on the soil sampling and physical and chemical properties, see: Orgiazzi, A., Ballabio, C., Panagos, P., Jones, A., & Fernández-Ugalde, O. (2018). LUCAS Soil, the largest expandable soil dataset for Europe: a review. European Journal of Soil Science, 69(1), 140-153. https://doi.org/10.1111/ejss.12499 For more details on the measurements of soil microbial respiration and biomass, fatty acids, and water holding capacity, see the supplementary methods of the associated paper (Appendix 2). [Usage Notes] Fatty acid analysis was performed for a subset of 267 samples. Water holding capacity and associated measurements of basal respiration was analyzed in a subset of 100 samples. The samples that were not in these subsets have NA values for the columns associated with these measurements. In order to protect the precise locations of the LUCAS sampling sites, latitude and longitude values could not be given. The approximate location of each sampling site is instead described by the NUTS3 region. If you wish to replicate the structural equation modeling described in the paper, for which latitude is required, please get in touch. A description of each column is available in the associated metadata file., The aim of this study was to quantify direct and indirect relationships between soil microbial community properties (potential basal respiration, microbial biomass) and abiotic factors (soil, climate) in three major land-cover types. Location: Europe Time period: 2018 Major taxa studied: Microbial community (fungi and bacteria) We collected 881 soil samples from across Europe in the framework of the Land Use/Land Cover Area Frame Survey (LUCAS). We measured potential soil basal respiration at 20ºC and microbial biomass (substrate-induced respiration) using an O2-microcompensation apparatus. Climate and soil data were obtained from previous LUCAS surveys and online databases. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to quantify relationships between variables, and equations extracted from SEMs were used to create predictive maps. Fatty acid methyl esters were measured in a subset of samples to distinguish fungal from bacterial biomass. Soil microbial properties in croplands were more heavily affected by climate variables than those in forests. Potential soil basal respiration and microbial biomass were correlated in forests but decoupled in grasslands and croplands, where microbial biomass depended on soil carbon. Forests had a higher ratio of fungi to bacteria than grasslands or croplands. Soil microbial communities in grasslands and croplands are likely carbon-limited in comparison with those in forests, and forests have a higher dominance of fungi indicating differences in microbial community composition. Notably, the often already-degraded soils of croplands could be more vulnerable to climate change than more natural soils. The provided maps show potentially vulnerable areas that should be explicitly accounted for in coming management plans to protect soil carbon and slow the increasing vulnerability of European soils to climate change., Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Award: FZT 118-202548816. European Research Council, Award: 694368. European Commission. Directorate-General for the Environment. Direction Générale Opérationnelle Agriculture, Ressources Naturelles et Environnement du Service Public de Wallonie. Eurostat., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: EC/H2020/694368
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286145, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15078
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286145
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286145, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15078
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286145
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286145, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15078
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286145
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286145, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15078
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286145

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286164
Dataset. 2021

NORMALIZED NMR INTEGRATION VALUES FROM THE METABOLOMIC ANALYSIS OF DROSOPHILA LARVAE EXTRACTS FROM 2 GENOTYPES AT 3 TIME POINTS

  • Juarez-Carreño, Sergio
  • Vallejo, Marcela
  • Carranza Valencia, Juan
  • Palomino-Schätzlein, Martina
  • Ramón-Cañellas, Pol
  • Santoro, Roberto
  • de Hartog, Emily
  • Ferres-Marco, Dolores
  • Romero, Aitana
  • Peterson, Hannah Payette
  • Ballesta-Illan, Esther
  • Pineda-Lucena, Antonio
  • Domínguez, María
We measured the metabolites related to energy production using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). No alterations in the levels of carbohydrate stores or free amino acids were found between control and Sema1ai animals, corroborating the notion that the main metabolic changes are in the lipid metabolism. The exception is the glycolytic amino acid alanine (elevated in Sema1ai animals), confirming alterations in glycolysis. The levels of the ß-alanine amino acid are markedly reduced in 256 h AEL or 10.5-day-old Sema1ai animals, probably indicating muscle degeneration in the severely obese larvae that is consistent with the deteriorated state and reduced movement of the 10-day-old (256 hours) mutant larvae. Gluconeogenesis is stimulated by high lactate, and the concentration of lactate is higher in Sema1ai larvae than controls, though the difference is not statistically significant. Glycolysis is stimulated by glucose and inhibited by citrate, an early intermediate of the citric acid cycle. The increased citrate levels in the 10.5-day-old Sema1ai larvae suggest that glycolysis is lower at this age, consistent with the increased level of glucose in the severely obese larvae. The fact that both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis pathways are simultaneously enhanced in Sema1ai larvae support the hypothesis that the animals defecting in adiposity signaling are in a state of perceived energy insufficiency despite having sufficient energy stored., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286164
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286164
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286164
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286164
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286164
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286164
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286164
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286164

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286180
Dataset. 2020

UP IN THE AIR: THREATS TO AFROMONTANE BIODIVERSITY FROM CLIMATE CHANGE AND HABITAT LOSS REVEALED BY GENETIC MONITORING OF THE ETHIOPIAN HIGHLANDS BAT

  • Razgour, Orly
  • Kasso, Mohammed
  • Santos, Helena
  • Juste, Javier
[Methods] This dataset is for 50 Bale long-eared bats, Plecotus balensis, captured in five moutnain ranges in Ethiopia 2014-2015 and genotyped for 19 polymorphic autosomal microsatellite loci previously developed for the genus (Razgour et al., 2013, Ecology Letters, https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12158) and two mitochondrial DNA regions: 650 bp fragment of the gene cytochrome b (cytb) and 460 bp fragment of the hyper-variable region (HV1) of the control region. The microsatellite dataset is presented as genepop file. Sequence assembly of the concatenated cytochrome b and hyper-variable I region of the mitochondrial DNA is presented as .fasta file. The dataset also includes output of the Maxent species distribution models and STRUCTURE (Bayesian individual-based assignment tests) outputs., Whilst climate change is recognised as a major future threat to biodiversity, most species are currently threatened by extensive human-induced habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation. Tropical high altitude alpine and montane forest ecosystems and their biodiversity are particularly sensitive to temperature increases under climate change, but they are also subject to accelerated pressures from land conversion and degradation due to a growing human population. We studied the combined effects of anthropogenic land-use change, past and future climate changes and mountain range isolation on the endemic Ethiopian Highlands long-eared bat, Plecotus balensis, an understudied bat that is restricted to the remnant natural high altitude Afroalpine and Afromontane habitats. We integrated ecological niche modelling, landscape genetics and model-based inference to assess the genetic, geographic and demographic impacts of past and recent environmental changes. We show that mountain range isolation and historic climates shaped population structure and patterns of genetic variation, but recent anthropogenic land-use change and habitat degradation are associated with a severe population decline and loss of genetic diversity. Models predict that the suitable niche of this bat has been progressively shrinking since the last glaciation period. This study highlights threats to Afroalpine and Afromontane biodiversity, squeezed to higher altitudes under climate change while losing genetic diversity and suffering population declines due to anthropogenic land-use change. We conclude that the conservation of tropical montane biodiversity requires a holistic approach, using genetic, ecological and geographic information to understand the effects of environmental changes across temporal scales and simultaneously addressing the impacts of multiple threats., British Ecological Society, Award: 4849/5889. EBD-CSIC, Award: MicroP_SO_14 and MicroProy_SO_15. Natural Environment Research Council, Award: UK NE/M018660/1. University of Stirling, Award: Impact Fellowship. EBD-CSIC, Award: MicroP_SO_14 and MicroProy_SO_15., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286180
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286180
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286180
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286180
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286180
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286180
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286180
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286180

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286183
Dataset. 2021

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL 2 FROM: PETZA D, ANASTOPOULOS P, COLL M, GARCIA SM, KAISER M, KALOGIROU S, LOURDI I, RICE J, SCIBERRAS M, KATSANEVAKIS S (2021) THE CONTRIBUTION OF AREA-BASED FISHERIES MANAGEMENT MEASURES TO FISHERIES SUSTAINABILITY AND MARINE CONSERVATION: A GLOBAL SCOPING REVIEW PROTOCOL. RESEARCH IDEAS AND OUTCOMES 7: E70486. HTTPS://DOI.ORG/10.3897/RIO.7.E70486

  • Petza, Dimitra
  • Anastopoulos, Panagiotis
  • Coll, Marta
  • Garcia, Serge
  • Kaiser, Michel
  • Kalogirou, Stefanos
  • Lourdi, Irene
  • Rice, Jake
  • Sciberras, Marija
  • Katsanevakis, Stelios
The contribution of Area-Based Fisheries' Management Measures to Fisheries Sustainability and Marine Conservation: a global scoping review protocol - Data Extraction Tool, A charting table aligned to the objective and the questions of the ScR, including specific details about the participants, concept, context, study methods and key findings relevant to the review objective., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286183
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286183
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286183
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286183
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286183
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286183
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286183
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286183

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286275
Dataset. 2021

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL 1 FROM: PETZA D, ANASTOPOULOS P, COLL M, GARCIA SM, KAISER M, KALOGIROU S, LOURDI I, RICE J, SCIBERRAS M, KATSANEVAKIS S (2021) THE CONTRIBUTION OF AREA-BASED FISHERIES MANAGEMENT MEASURES TO FISHERIES SUSTAINABILITY AND MARINE CONSERVATION: A GLOBAL SCOPING REVIEW PROTOCOL. RESEARCH IDEAS AND OUTCOMES 7: E70486. HTTPS://DOI.ORG/10.3897/RIO.7.E70486

  • Petza, Dimitra
  • Anastopoulos, Panagiotis
  • Coll, Marta
  • Garcia, Serge
  • Kaiser, Michel
  • Kalogirou, Stefanos
  • Lourdi, Irene
  • Rice, Jake
  • Sciberras, Marija
  • Katsanevakis, Stelios
The contribution of Area-Based Fisheries Management Measures to Fisheries Sustainability and Marine Conservation: a global scoping review protocol - Search Strategy, The entire search strategy (query string) applied in Scopus at 11 June 2021 and search results (number of articles retrieved), Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286275, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15079
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286275
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286275, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15079
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286275
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286275, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15079
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286275
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286275, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15079
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286275

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286279
Dataset. 2021

DATASETS FROM: ADAPTATION OF MEDITERRANEAN FOREST SPECIES TO CLIMATE: LESSONS FROM COMMON GARDEN EXPERIMENTS

  • Ramírez-Valiente, Jose Alberto
  • Santos del Blanco, Luis
  • Chambel, Maria Regina
  • Caño, F.
  • Notivol, Eduardo
  • Alía, Ricardo
  • Robledo-Arnuncio, Juan J
  • Climent, Jose
We include information (raw Datasets) corresponding to the paper; Adaptation of Mediterranean forest species to climate: lessons from common garden experiments. Table Journal of Ecology Review.xls. Material used in the metaanalysis JoE Row data Common garden.xls. Raw data for survival and height used in the study. Multi-environment commong garden data for Pinus canariensis, P. halepensis, P. nigra, P. pinaster, Quercus ilex, and Q. suber. JoE Dataset4.xls. Data used for the analysis of local adaptation., Techcnial assitance in Data measurements: del Caño, F, Barba D, Chambel R. Data adquisiton was funded by the Spanish Ministry of Agriculture (AEG-17-048) and the Spanish Ministry of Science (RTI2018-094691-B-C32)., Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286279
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286279
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286279
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286279
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286279
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286279
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286279
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286279

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286281
Dataset. 2020

NEW EVIDENCE OF CRYPTIC SPECIATION IN THE FAMILY LONGIDORIDAE (NEMATODA: DORYLAIMIDA)

  • Cai, Ruihang
  • Archidona-Yuste, Antonio
  • Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, C.
  • Palomares Rius, Juan E.
  • Castillo, Pablo
Longidorid nematodes comprise more than 500 species, and Longidorus and Xiphinema are the most diversified, abundant and cosmopolitan genera, which increases the risk of species misidentification. We conducted an integrative morphometric and genetic study on two longidorid species to elucidate the existence of new cases of cryptic speciation within the genera Longidorus and Xiphinema. Detailed morphological, morphometric, multivariate and genetic studies were carried out, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear haploweb analyses, to differentiate species within the L. iliturgiensis- and X. hispanum-complexes. Species delimitation using haplonet tools of L. iliturgiensis-species complex clearly separated L. tabernensis sp. nov. from L. iliturgiensis and L. indalus. Similarly, the haploweb analysis of X. subbaetense sp. nov. showed it as a unique and separate species from X. hispanum and X. adenohystherum. D2-D3 expansion domains of 28S rRNA, partial 18S rRNA, and partial coxI region were used for inferring phylogenetic relationships. The present study provides new insights into the diversity of Longidorus and Xiphinema species detected in southern Spain, and new evidence of cryptic speciation in both genera. These results support our hypothesis that the biodiversity of Longidoridae in southern Europe is higher than previously supposed and is still not fully clarified., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286281, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15080
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286281
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286281, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15080
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286281
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286281, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15080
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286281
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286281, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15080
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286281

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286294
Dataset. 2023

DATASET RELATED TO A STUDY TO IDENTIFY GENOMIC REGIONS IN SUSCEPTIBILITY TO SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI INFECTION IN A MURINE BACKCROSS

IDENTIFICATION OF GENOMIC REGIONS IMPLICATED IN SUSCEPTIBILITY TO &QUOT;SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI&QUOT; INFECTION IN A MURINE GENETIC MODEL (BACKCROSS)

  • Hernández-Goenaga, Juan
  • López-Abán, Julio
  • Blanco-Gómez, Adrián
  • Vicente, Belén
  • Burguillo, Francisco J.
  • Pérez-Losada, J.
  • Muro, Antonio
This dataset was intended to describe schistosomiasis severity in a backcross cohort and to study the genetic linkage analysis with parasitological, pathological and immunological variables., [Description of methods used for collection/generation of data] F1BX mice were infected with 150 ± 5 S. mansoni cercariae each mouse and nine weeks post-infection were euthanized. We considered 20 variables: granulomas; affected liver surface (mm2/cm2); the number of adult male and female worms; eggs per gram of liver and small intestine; eggs in liver and small intestine per female; CD4, CD8, CD45, CD220 in blood or spleen; IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgM antibodies. Multivariate models (cluster and principal component analyses and K-means) identified four levels of infection intensity in the cohort. The genetic regions associated with severity were assessed by massive genotyping and genetic linkage analysis using 961 informative SNPs., [Methods for processing the data] Mean and standard error in each variable, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. ANOVA and Tukey’ test or Student t-test. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) and Student t-test for the statistical significance. Multivariant models considering sex influence in worm recovery, eggs in the liver and intestine, fecundity, granulomas and the affected liver surface. All the variables were standardized to 0 mean and standard deviation to 1. Cluster analysis, dendrogram, Principal components analysis and conglomerates by k-means were used to generate clusters. Median proportions were performed. SIMFIT statistical package for Windows version 7.3.7 were used Massive genotyping and geneticlinkage analysis using 961 informative SNPs: The genetic distance based on the recombination frequencies between markers in the F1BX cohort was compared with http://cgd.jax.org/mousemapconverter using maximum-likelihood mapping with HM algorithm. The Haldane function was used with a step size of 2.5 cM and a genotyping error of 0.001. We used the LOD-score to calculate the statistical significance of the linkage of the QTLs found. LOD-score higher than 1.4 suggested linkage. The Ensembl bioinformatics tool (https://www.ensembl.org/index.html) was used to identify syntenic regions between mouse and human., Here we present the dataset used in our study entitled "Identification of genomic regions implicated in susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni infection in a murine genetic model (backcross)". Thus, we crossed the C57BL/6 mouse strain with the CBA one and then the F1B6CBA females (C57 x CBA) were backcrossed with CBA males generating the F1BX cohort of the study. The study consists of the identification of genetic markers of schistosomiasis. High infection levels and severe liver fibrosis in schistosomiasis appear only in a few highly susceptible infected people. Schistosomiasis could be a complex trait disease and it could be possible to identify genetic markers associated with severity. This study uses a genetically heterogeneous back-cross cohort with genetically unique mice. A backcross (F1BX) mouse cohort was generated after two stages; firstly, we crossed a mouse strain (CBA/2J) susceptible to schistosomiasis with a resistant one (C57BL/6J) to generate the F1B6CBA mice; secondly, the F1BX mice were generated by backcrossing. F1B6CBA female mice with CBA/2J males. F1BX mice were infected with 150 ± 5 S. mansoni cercariae each mouse and nine weeks post-infection were euthanized. We considered 20 variables: granulomas; affected liver surface (mm2/cm2); the number of adult male and female worms; eggs per gram of liver and small intestine; eggs in liver and small intestine per female; CD4, CD8, CD45, CD220 in blood or spleen; IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgM antibodies. Multivariate models (cluster and principal component analyses and K-means) identified four levels of infection intensity in the cohort. The genetic regions associated with severity were assessed by massive genotyping and genetic linkage analysis using 961 informative SNPs., The main research project is: Red de Investigación Colaborativa en Enfermedades Tropicales (RICET) Ref.: RD16/0027/0018., Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286294, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15081
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286294
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286294, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15081
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286294
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286294, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15081
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286294
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/286294, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15081
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/286294

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