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Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280150
Dataset. 2019

SUPREMET HACKATHON

  • González-Recio, Oscar
This data set contains information on the rumen microbiome of 340 dairy cows, sequenced within the METALGEN project (RTA2015-00022-C03).-- Sequenced with a MinION from Oxford Nanopore Technology., The purpose of this data set is to serve as a training exercise to predict a complex phenotype using metagenomic data within the workshop SUPREMET 2019 "Supercomputación para la predicción de enfermedades y caracteres complejos usando información del metagenoma"., METALGEN, Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades, RTA2015-00022-C03., Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280150
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280150
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280150
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280150
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280150
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280150
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280150
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280150

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280152
Dataset. 2019

INVENTARIO NACIONAL DE RECURSOS FITOGENÉTICOS CEREALES DE INVIERNO

  • Rosa, Lucía de la
  • García, Rosa M.
Cereales de invierno 2020., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280152
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280152
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280152
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280152
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280152
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280152
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280152
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280152

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280163
Dataset. 2022

DATASETS OF "SOLUTE TRAPPING AND THE MECHANISMS OF NON-FICKIAN TRANSPORT IN PARTIALLY SATURATED POROUS MEDIA"

  • Ben-Noah, Ilan
  • Hidalgo, Juan J.
  • Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín
  • Dentz, Marco
[Methodological information] Velocity probability density functions (vpdfs) and breakthrough curves (BTC) for different saturation degrees (65, 70, 80, and 100) and molecular diffusion coefficents (D) were calculated from direct numerical simulation using COMSOL multiphysics as described in the paper "Solute Trapping and the Mechanisms of Non-Fickian Transport in Partially Saturated Porous Media", With funding from the Spanish government through the ‘Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence’ accreditation (CEX2018-000794-S)., I.B.N, M.D. acknowledge funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. HORIZON-MSCA-2021-PF-01 (USFT). I.B.N. , J.J.H. and M.D. acknowledge the support of the Spanish Research Agency (10.13039/501100011033), Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation through grants CEX2018-000794-S and HydroPore PID2019-106887GB-C31. J.J.H. acknowledges the support of the Spanish Research Agency (10.13039/501100011033), the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and the European Social Fund ``Investing in your future'' through the ``Ram\'on y Cajal'' fellowship (RYC-2017-22300). J.J.M. gratefully acknowledges the financial support from the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF, grant nr. 200021 178986)., Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280163, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14753
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280163
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280163, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14753
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280163
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280163, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14753
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280163
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280163, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14753
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280163

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235
Dataset. 2022

DOES THE TEMPERATURE-SIZE RULE APPLY TO MARINE PROTOZOANS AFTER PROPER ACCLIMATION? [DATASET]

  • Calbet, Albert
  • Saiz, Enric
The temperature-size rule hypothesized that there is a negative relationship between the size (volume) of an organism and the temperature. This applies to both unicellular and pluricellular organisms. Here, we question this hypothesis for the particular case of protozoans, because in these organisms the volume is directly related to the consumption of prey, and on most of the occasions the true volume of the cell is unknown. To prove our arguments, we designed a series of experiments with the heterotrophic dinoflagellate O. marina, including functional and numerical responses, time-dependent acclimation responses, and estimation of the protozoan volume during long periods of starvation. Our data showed that, in fact, the observed temperature-size rule in unicellular grazers results from anabolic and catabolic imbalances, and that the relationship between size and temperature weakens after proper thermal adaptation. We also showed that once prey are fully digested, the protozoan’ size is the same irrespectively of the temperature. Finally, we set the basis for proper acclimation during short-term temperature experiments, which specifies that at least 3 days should be allowed for proper temperature acclimation. We also suggest that, for trustable experiments, the grazer should be incubated at the target prey concentration for at least 24h before conducting the experiments. The ecological implications of a lack of correlation between microzooplankton size and temperature are also discussed, This research was funded by Grant PID2020-118645RB-I00 by Ministerio de Ciencia e innovación (MCIN)/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033 and by “ERDF A way of making Europe”. It is a contribution of the Marine Zooplankton Ecology Group (2017 SGR 87). With the institutional support of the ‘Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence’ accreditation (CEX2019-000928-S), Para Oxyrrhis marina: Tasas de ingestion a diferentes concentraciones de alimento (presa/ind/d), Tasa crecimiento (µ 1/d), Volumen (µm3); para la presa (Rhodomonas salina): volume (µm3), Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280235, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14754
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280235, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14754
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280235, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14754
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280235, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14754
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280249
Dataset. 2022

TOTAL DATA_BA

  • Casado, Marta
Methods 20 μL of plasma samples were spiked with deuterated internal standards stock solution. Then proteins were precipitated and supernatants were dried and reconstituted in methanol:water (50:50, V/V). Besides, approximately 50 mg of each tissue were placed in 2 ml tubes containing CK14 ceramic beads (Precellys). For each 50 mg of tissue, 300 μl of methanol and the deuterated internal standards were added and tissues were homogenized in a Precellys 24 Dual system equipped with a Criolys cooler (Precellys). Samples were analyzed using an Acquity UPLC system (Waters, UK) equipped with an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (1.7μm, 2.1 x 100 mm; Waters). The MS analysis was performed using a Waters Xevo TQ-XS mass spectrometer (Waters) with an ESI source working in the negative-ion mode., Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in different liver diseases, but little is known about the significance of COX-2 or its metabolites in cholestatic injury. This study was designed to elucidate the role of COX-2 expression during the pathogenesis of cholestasis. Thus, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the role of COX-2 and its derived prostaglandins in modulating cell survival, inflammation, oxidative stress status and the synthesis and excretion of bile acids (BA) in response to cholestatic liver injury. We used genetically modified mice constitutively expressing human COX-2 (hCOX-2-Tg) specifically in hepatocytes. Transgenic mice (hCOX-2-Tg) and their wild-type (Wt) littermates were either subjected to a common bile duct ligation (BDL) to establish an experimental model of obstructive cholestasis. We performed an exhaustive analysis of the different types of bile acids (total, primary, secondary, conjugated, non-conjugated and hydrophilic, α-, β- and ω-muricholic acid) in plasma and in liver tissue from Wt and h-COX-2 Tg mice. Samples were analyzed at Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe (Valencia, Spain) detecting a total of 31 analytes., Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación/Agencia Estatal de Investigación 10.13039/501100011033 (PID2019-108977RB-I00), No

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280249, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14755
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280249
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280249, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14755
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280249
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280249, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14755
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280249
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280249, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14755
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280249

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295
Dataset. 2022

DRIVERS OF POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION IN PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN A TEMPERATE CONIFER: A 27-YEAR STUDY [DATASET], DRIVERS OF PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN A FOREST TREE [DATASET]

  • Mata Pombo, Raúl de la
[EN] These project improve our understanding of the microevolutionary drivers of phenotypic plasticity, a critical process for resilience of long-lived species under climate change, and support decision making in tree genetic improvement programs and seed transfer strategies. The dataset compiles the three common garden tests (Condon, Lubrecht and Little Wolf) established in western Montana (USA) followed a Population × Family structure. Seeds were collected from 115 open-pollinated, unrelated wild mother trees in the 23 populations. Every population was represented by 5 open-pollinated families and every family was planted in all three trials. One-year-old bare-root seedlings were planted in 1974 on a 3 × 3 m spacing using a randomized complete block design at the family level with 4-tree-row plots and 5 blocks in each site. Tree growth was measured as tree height at ages 2, 4, 5, 11, 16, 21 and 27, and diameter at breast height (DBH; 1.4 m above ground) at ages 5, 11, 16, 21 and 27. DBH at age 27 was chosen as the best predictor of genetic growth potential in these trials. Means and standard errors of DBH27 were compueted at the family level within each site., The Barrié Foundation provided postdoctoral support to Raúl de Mata (EDB-CSIC). The Inland Empire Tree Improvement Cooperative (Montana, USA) collected the data and Raúl de Mata (EDB-CSIC) processed the data. This project was partially funded by a McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research Grant MONZ-1206 from the College of Forestry and Conservation of the University of Montana., No

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280295, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14756
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280295, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14756
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280295, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14756
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280295, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14756
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280578
Dataset. 2022

DATA FROM: DIFFERENT TAXONOMIC AND FUNCTIONAL INDICES COMPLEMENT THE UNDERSTANDING OF HERB-LAYER COMMUNITY ASSEMBLY PATTERNS IN A SOUTHERN-LIMIT TEMPERATE FOREST

  • Valerio, Mercedes
  • Gazol Burgos, Antonio
  • Puy, Javier
  • Ibáñez, Ricardo
The efficient conservation of vulnerable ecosystems in the face of global change requires a complete understanding of how plant communities respond to various environmental factors. We aim to demonstrate that a combined use of different approaches, traits, and indices representing each of the taxonomic and functional characteristics of plant communities will give complementary information on the factors driving vegetation assembly patterns. We analyzed variation across an environmental gradient in taxonomic and functional composition, richness, and diversity of the herb-layer of a temperate beech-oak forest that was located in northern Spain. We measured species cover and four functional traits: leaf dry matter content (LDMC), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf size, and plant height. We found that light is the most limiting resource influencing herb-layer vegetation. Taxonomic changes in richness are followed by equivalent functional changes in the diversity of leaf size but by opposite responses in the richness of SLA. Each functional index is related to different environmental factors even within a single trait (particularly for LDMC and leaf size). To conclude, each characteristic of a plant community is influenced by different and even contrasting factors or processes. Combining different approaches, traits, and indices simultaneously will help us understand how plant communities work., Fundación Caja Navarra 10833 (Program “Tú Eliges, Tú Decides”). Universidad de Navarra, project “Biodiversity Data Analytics and Environmental Quality”. Universidad de Navarra, project “Red de Observatorios de la Biodiversidad de Navarra (ROBIN)”. Departamento de Educación, Gobierno de Navarra, Ayudas predoctorales para la realización de programas de doctorado de interés para Navarra; Plan de Formación y de I + D 2018 Ministerio Español de Ciencia e Innovación. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, PIE-20223AT003. EU “NextGenerationEU/PRTR”., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280590
Dataset. 2022

DATA FROM: PIGMENT MOLECULAR COMPOSITION REVEALS SIGNIFICANT INFORMATION FOR VISUAL COMMUNICATION

  • Galván, Ismael
1. Melanins are the most common pigments in vertebrates and, as such, fufill multiple adaptive functions, including honest signaling. This is the case of male pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca, whose dorsal plumage, composed of black and grey feathers pigmented by eumelanin, is sexually selected by females regarding the proportion of black. 2. However, the basis of such mating preferences and other associations with life-history traits are unknown. 3. Here I take advantage of recent advances in Raman spectroscopy analysis to investigate the monomeric composition of eumelanin, constituted by 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) subunits, in male pied flycatchers. 4. I found that plumage blackness (percentage of dorsal black feathers) increases with the DHICA:DHI ratio of the constituent black freathers, but not with that of grey feathers. The repeatability of DHICA:DHI measurements in black feathers is two times that in grey feathers. 5. Eumelanin chemistry may thus constitute the basis of signal honesty in pied flycatchers, as females preferentially mate with males with higher relative DHICA feather contents and this may be related to the lower pro-oxidant effect of DHICA. Given the the ubiquitous nature of melanin-based pigmentation phenotypes, the monomeric composition of eumelanin should therefore be considered, instead of eumelanin as a whole, for a better understanding of how and why phenotypes are linked to life-history traits in animals., Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Award: 202030I023., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280600
Dataset. 2021

DATA FROM: SELECTION FOR FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE IN THE EVOLUTION OF CUTICLE HARDENING MECHANISMS IN INSECTS

  • Laiolo, Paola
  • Pato Fernández, Joaquina
  • Illera Cobo, Juan Carlos
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
[Methods] We measured Zinc content and strengths of grasshopper mandibles, by means of scanning electron microscope and calibrated multifocus pictures. We used biological and ecological information obtained from field and experimental data on the grasshopper species inhabiting the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain). [Usage Notes] The different datasets of the study can be found in separate sheets. An informative title on sheet content has been given to each sheet. In tables, column names refer to the variable measured (and the unit of measurement)., Calcified tissues have repeatedly evolved in many animal lineages and show a tremendous diversity of forms and functions. The cuticle of many insects is enriched with elements other than Calcium, a strategy of hardening that is taxonomically widespread but apparently poorly variable among clades. Here, we investigate the evolutionary potential of the enrichment with metals in insect cuticle at different biological levels. We combined experimental evidence of Zinc content variation in the mandibles of a target species (Chorthippus cazurroi) with phylogenetic comparative analyses among grasshopper species. We found that mandibular Zinc content was repeatable among related individuals and was associated with an indicator of fitness, so there was potential for adaptive variation. Among species, Zinc enrichment evolved as a consequence of environmental and dietary influences on the physical function of the jaw (cutting and chewing), suggesting a role of natural selection in environmental fit. However, there were also important within and transgenerational environmental sources of similarity among individuals. These environmental influences, along with the tight relationship with biomechanics, may limit the potential for diversification of this hardening mechanism. This work provides novel insights into the diversification of biological structures and the link between evolutionary capacity and intra and interspecific variation., Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: CGL2017-85191-P/AEI/FEDER.UE. Gobierno del Principado de Asturias, Award: IDI/2018/000151. British Ecological Society, Award: 4278. FYCIT Asturias., Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280600
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280600
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280600
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280600
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280600
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280600
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280600
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280600

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280602
Dataset. 2021

ASSESSING IMPACTS OF SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL DIVERSITY ON RESILIENCE IN A WETLAND COUPLED HUMAN AND NATURAL SYSTEM: DATA RELEASE

  • Van Schmidt, Nathan D.
  • Oviedo, José L.
  • Hruska, Tracy
  • Huntsinger, Lynn
  • Kovach, Tony
  • Kilpatrick, A. Marm
  • Miller, Norman L.
  • Beissinger, Steven R.
[Methods] We mapped all emergent wetlands > 5×5 m within our study area—California’s Sierra Nevada foothills EPA zone III eco-region in Yuba, Nevada, and southern Butte countieso of California. Mapping was done by manually interpreting summer 2013 GeoEye-1 0.4 m imagery in Google Earth 7.1.5. Areas covered by hydrophytes (Typha spp., Scirpus spp., Juncus effusus, Leersia oryzoides, or various sedges) were considered wetland. We included hydrophytes that appeared seasonally dried; if green vegetation was present along the wetland-upland transition zone, we buffered 5 m into it. Open water and rice were excluded. If imagery was ambiguous, we used Google Earth imagery from adjacent years to help distinguish if a wetland was present. Each wetland’s geomorphology was classified as slope (shallow hillside flow), pond fringe, fluvial, rice fringe, irrigation ditch, or waterfowl impoundment. We combined historic imagery and field data to determine the water sources. We surveyed 237 wetlands for occupancy of Black Rails up to three times each summer from 2012–2016 using established broadcast survey methods (for details see Richmond et al. 2010). To assess the effects of water source on wetland hydrology, we resurveyed wetlands for 14 periods: in the early wet season (January 8–27), late wet season (March 22–25), early dry season (May 17–June 20), and late dry season (July 15–August 15) from summer 2013–2016. At each visit we walked throughout the wetland with a map of aerial imagery and recorded the percent wetness (areal percent of wetland saturated with water). We trapped mosquitoes at 63 wetlands from June–October, 2012–2014 (4710 trap/nights) and estimated WNV prevalence (probability of a mosquito testing positive for WNV) with genetic testing. We estimated WNV transmission risk at each wetland as the mean abundance of WNV-infected Culex spp. (the main WNV vectors) per trap/night. [Usage Notes] Note that wetland data is not a comprehensive list of all wetlands in the region. Missing values for black rail occupancy in some years or visits within years are delineated with, Theory posits that resilience of ecosystems increases when there is a diversity of agents (e.g., species) and linkages between them. If ecosystems are conceptualized as components of “coupled human and natural systems”, then a corollary would be that novel types of human-induced diversity may also foster resilience. We explored this hypothesis by studying how socially created diversity mediated the impact of a historically severe drought on a network of wetlands in the foothills of the California Sierra Nevada containing a metapopulation of the threatened California Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus). We examined how (1) diversity in motivations for land ownership affected use of irrigation water and response to drought, (2) differences in natural and irrigated water sources affected wetland drying in response to drought, and (3) these processes affected the persistence of rails and the transmission risk of West Nile virus, an emerging infectious disease that threatens people and rails. Wetlands were mostly fed by inefficiencies and leaks from the irrigation system. Wetlands with both natural and irrigated water sources were larger, wetter, and likelier to persist through drought because these two sources showed response diversity by drying at different times. Wetlands with diverse water sources also provided the best habitat for the California Black Rail, and irrigation appeared responsible for its persistence through the drought. Irrigation increased WNV transmission risk by increasing the quantity, but not the quality, of wetland habitats for mosquitoes. The impacts of social diversity were more ambiguous, with redundancy prevalent. However, profit-motivated landowners provided wetlands more irrigation during non-drought conditions, while other landowner types were more likely to continue providing irrigation during drought. This dataset provides the wetland, California Black Rail, and West Nile virus data that support the findings of this study. Partial social and geospatial data are available by emailing the first author upon request, excluding some information that would make respondents identifiable., Sierra Foothills Audubon Society. National Science Foundation, Award: CNH-1115069. National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1051342. Spanish Ministry of Culture and Education’s Salvador de Madariaga Program, Award: PRX16/00452., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
HANDLE: dataset/doi:10.6078/D1970G" target="_blank">http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280602, http://datadryad.org/stash/dataset/doi:10.6078/D1970G
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280602
Ver en: dataset/doi:10.6078/D1970G" target="_blank">http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280602, http://datadryad.org/stash/dataset/doi:10.6078/D1970G
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280602

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