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Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276396
Dataset

EMERGING STABILITY OF FOREST PRODUCTIVITY BY MIXING TWO SPECIES BUFFERS TEMPERATURE DESTABILIZING EFFECT

  • del Río, Miren
  • Ruiz-Peinado, Ricardo
  • Holm, Stig Olof
  • Jansons, Aris
  • Nord‐Larsen, Thomas
  • Verheyen, Kris
  • Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés
  • Pretzsch, Hans
  • Jactel, H.
  • Coll, Lluis
  • Löf, Magnus
  • Aldea, Jorge
  • Ammer, Christian
  • Avdagić, Admir
  • Barbeito, Ignacio
  • Bielak, Kamil
  • Bravo, Felipe
  • Brazaitis, Gediminas
  • Cerný, Jakub
  • Collet, Catherine
  • Condés, Sonia
  • Drössler, Lars
  • Fabrika, Marek
  • Heym, Michael
  • Hylen, Gro
  • Kurylyak, Viktor
  • Lombardi, Fabio
  • Matović, Bratislav
  • Metslaid, Marek
  • Motta, Renzo
  • Nothdurft, Arne
  • den Ouden, Jan
  • Pach, Maciej
  • Pardos, Marta
  • Poeydebat, Charlotte
  • Ponette, Quentin
  • Pérot, Tomas
  • Reventlow, Ditlev Otto Juel
  • Sitko, Roman
  • Sramek, Vit
  • Steckel, Mathias
  • Svoboda, Miroslav
  • Vospernik, Sonja
  • Wolff, Barbara
  • Zlatanov, Tzvetan
[Methods] The research unit is the forest stand. We used data from a total of 261 forest stands belonging to three triplet-transects across Europe. Each triplet consists of a plot established in a two species mixed stands, and two plots on the respective monospecific stands; the three stands are located close to each other under similar environmental conditions. The species composition of the mixtures changes in the three triplet-transects. The first transect covers monospecific and mixed stands of Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris (32 sites, 96 stands), the second of Quercus petraea and Pinus sylvestris (35 sites, 105 stands), and the third of Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris (20 sites, 60 stands). Plot sizes varies from 0-02 to 0.15 ha depending on stand density a local site characteristics. In each plot the diameter of all trees was measured, and two increment cores per tree were taken at a 1.3 m stem height in a sample of approximately 20 trees per species and plot. Annual ring widths were measured and cross-dated using standardized dendrochronological techniques. The studied period was 2000-2013 for the beech-pine transect and 2004-2017 for the oak-pine and spruce-pine transects (except in five triplets where the period was 2000-2013), the last year corresponding to triplet establishment. Using data from cored trees, tree diameter increment-diameter models were fitted by year, species and plot to estimate diameter increments of noncored trees for the studied period. Dead trees during the last 14 years were estimated using stumps, standing and lying dead trees, and their decomposition status. Based on measured tree diameters and annual diameter increments we estimated species and stand annual basal area (BA) and basal area growth (BAI), which conforms the dataset. Annual climate data were obtained from meteorological weather stations located in the proximity of each triplet (50 triplets). When local station data were not available, national digital climatic atlas data (24 triplets) or more general gridded data (13 triplets) were used (mostly CRU gridded database). For each triplet mean and standard deviation of annual precipitation (P) and mean annual temperature (T) for the studied period were calculated., [Usage Notes] The are presented in an excel-table which can be open freely in different ways (open office, google docs, etc.)., The increasing disturbances in monocultures around the world are testimony to their instability under global change. Many studies have claimed that temporal stability of productivity increase with species richness, although the ecological fundaments have mainly been investigated through diversity experiments. To adequately manage forest ecosystems, it is necessary to have a comprehensive understanding of the effect of mixing species on the temporal stability of productivity and the way in which this it is influenced by climate conditions across large geographical areas. Here, we used a unique dataset of 261 stands combining pure and two-species mixtures of four relevant tree species over a wide range of climate conditions in Europe to examine the effect of species mixing on the level and temporal stability of productivity. Structural equation modelling was employed to further explore the direct and indirect influence of climate, overyielding, species asynchrony and additive effect (i.e. temporal stability expected from the species growth in monospecific stands) on temporal stability in mixed forests. We showed that by adding only one tree species to monocultures, the level (overyielding: +6%) and stability (temporal stability: +12%) of stand growth increased significantly. We identified the key effect of temperature on destabilizing stand growth, which may be mitigated by mixing species. We further confirmed asynchrony as the main driver of temporal stability in mixed stands, through both the additive effect and species interactions, which modify between-species asynchrony in mixtures in comparison to monocultures. Synthesis and applications. This study highlights the emergent properties associated with mixing two-species, which result in resource efficient and temporally stable production systems. We reveal the negative impact of mean temperature on temporal stability of forest productivity and how the stabilizing effect of mixing two species can counterbalance this impact. The overyielding and temporal stability of growth addressed in this paper are essential for ecosystem services closely linked with the level and rhythm of forest growth. Our results underline that mixing two species can be a realistic and effective nature-based climate solution, which could contribute towards meeting EU climate target policies., Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276396
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276396
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276396
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276396
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276396
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276396
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276396
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276396

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276488
Dataset

EFFECT OF WATER AVAILABILITY ON VOLATILE-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION BETWEEN POTATO PLANTS IN RESPONSE TO INSECT HERBIVORY

  • Vázquez-González, Carla
  • Pombo-Salinas, Laura
  • Martín-Cacheda, Lucia
  • Rasmann, Sergio
  • Roeder, Gregory
  • Abdala-Roberts, Luis
  • Mooney, Kailen A.
  • Moreira Tomé, Xoaquín
[Methods] In April 2021, we sowed 168 tubers from three different Solanum tuberosum varieties (cv. Baraka, cv. Desiree, and cv. Monalisa) in 4-L pots containing potting soil and peat (Gramoflor GmbH & Co. KG Produktion, Vechta, Germany). We grew plants in a glasshouse under controlled light (minimum 10 h per day, Photosynthetically Active Radiation = 725 ± 19 μmol m-2 s-1) and temperature (10°C night, 25°C day), and watered them twice a week up to field capacity. Five weeks after germination, we assigned half of the plants to one of two water availability treatments: high (i.e., well-watered) vs. low (i.e., reduced watering) water availability (Fig. 1). We watered plants in the high water availability treatment every three days to replenish the 100% of their water demand, whereas for plants in the low water availability treatment watering was reduced to meet the 25% of the total water demand. We estimated water demand gravimetrically.To corroborate that plants in the low water availability treatment were under higher physiological stress in comparison to well-watered plants, two weeks after the start of the treatments (right before applying the herbivory treatment, see below) we used a subset of 24 plants (half high and half low water availability; four of each potato variety) to measure stomatal conductance and photosynthesis. We measured stomatal conductance and net photosynthetic rate on a leaflet of a young, fully-expanded leaf from 11:30 to 12:30 am at an irradiance of 1500 μmol m-2 s-1 and CO2 concentration of 400 μmol mol-1 with a portable photosynthesis system Li-6400XT (Li-Cor Inc., Lincoln, NE, USA). Plants in the low water availability treatment exhibited significantly lower stomatal conductance (F1,22 = 22.1, P < 0.001) and photosynthetic rates (F1,22 = 31.5. P < 0.001) compared to well-watered plants. Specifically, reduced watering resulted in a 90 % and an 80% decrease in stomatal conductance (high water availability: 0.073 ± 0.01 mol H2O m-2 s-1; low water availability: 0.008 ± 0.01 mol H2O m-2 s-1) and photosynthesis rates (high water availability: 9.31 ± 0.94 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1; low water availability: 1.88 ± 0.94 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1), respectively (Fig. S1a, b). Seven weeks after germination (two weeks after establishing the water availability treatments), we paired 144 potato plants in 37.5 × 37.5 × 96.5 cm plastic cages to prevent VOCs cross-contamination between replicates. One plant of each pair (i.e., replicate) acted as the emitter (average height ± SE = 51.17 ± 0.64 cm) and the other served as the receiver (48.52 ± 0.70 cm). Within each cage, emitter and receiver plants were placed 20 cm apart so that they did not touch each other. Plants in each water stress treatment were randomly selected as either receiver or emitter plants resulting in a factorial design consisting on four combinations of water availability treatment in the emitter (two levels; high vs. low) and water availability treatment in the receiver (two levels; high vs. low) (Fig. 1). In addition, we randomly assigned emitter plants within each cage to one of the following herbivory treatments: (1) subjected to S. exigua feeding (“herbivore-induced plants” hereafter) or (2) control (intact; no herbivory) plants (Fig. 1). Overall, the experiment consisted in 72 replicate cages, namely 36 for the herbivore-induced treatment (nine per emitter vs. receiver water availability combination) vs. 36 for the control (nine per emitter vs. receiver water availability combination). Emitter and receiver plants were always of the same variety and varieties were similarly distributed across treatment combinations. For herbivore-induced emitters, we placed two third-instar larvae of S. exigua on each of three fully expanded leaves per plant using a fine paintbrush and covered these leaves with a nylon bag to prevent herbivore dispersal. For control plants, we covered three fully expanded leaves with a nylon bag but without adding the larvae to control for a possible bagging effect. After four days of herbivore feeding, we removed all emitter plants from cages and collected VOCs from each emitter (see below). After VOCs sampling, we collected leaves subjected to larvae feeding and photographed them with a Samsung Galaxy A30s (25 effective megapixels, 4× digital zoom). We estimated the percentage of leaf area consumed using the mobile application BioLeaf - Foliar Analysis™ (Brandoli Machado et al., 2016). Average percentage leaf area consumed by S. exigua for herbivore-induced emitters was 77.58% (± 3.72) and was homogeneously distributed among plants in the high (80.46% ± 3.50) vs. low (73.63% ± 4.25) water availability treatments (F1,33 = 0.7; P = 0.399). We collected aboveground VOCs produced by emitter plants following Rasmann et al. (2011). Briefly, we bagged plants with a 2-L Nalophan bag and trapped VOCs on a charcoal filter (SKC sorbent tube filled with anascorb CSC coconut-shell charcoal) for two hours at a rate of 0.25 L min-1. We eluted traps with 150 μL dichloromethane (CAS#75-09-2, Merck, Dietikon, Switzerland) to which we had previously added one internal standard (tetralin [CAS#119-64-2], 200 ng in 10 μL dichloromethane). We then injected 1.5 μL of the extract for each sample into an Agilent 7890B gas chromatograph (GC) coupled with a 5977B mass selective detector (MSD) fitted with a 30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 μm film thickness HP-5MS fused silica column (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA). We operated the GC in pulsed splitless mode (250 ºC, injection pressure 15 psi) with helium as the carrier gas (constant flow rate 0.9 mL min-1). The GC oven temperature programme was: 3.5 min hold at 40ºC, 5ºC min-1 ramp to 230ºC, then a 3 min hold at 250ºC post run. Transfer line was set at 280 ºC. In the MS detector (EI mode), a 33-350 (m/z) mass scan range was used with MS source and quadrupole set at 230ºC and 150ºC, respectively. We identified volatile terpenes using the NIST MS Search Program v.2.3 and by comparison with the terpenes reference database developed at the University of Neuchâtel and based on pure standards. We quantified total emission of individual VOCs using normalized peak areas and expressed it as nanograms per hour (ng h-1). We obtained the normalized peak area of each individual compound by dividing their integrated peak area by the integrated peak area of the internal standard (Abdala-Roberts et al., 2022). The total emission of VOCs was then calculated as the sum of individual VOCs. The same day after collecting emitter VOCs, we set up an herbivore bioassay for receiver plants to test whether prior exposure to VOCs from herbivore-induced emitters increased herbivore resistance. For this, we placed one third-instar S. exigua larvae on each of two fully expanded leaves per plant following the same procedure described above for emitter induction. We kept larvae on receivers for three days and then estimated the percentage of leaf area consumed by S. exigua (‘leaf damage’ hereafter) using the same procedure described above for emitter plants., Airborne plant communication is a widespread phenomenon in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from damaged plants boost herbivore resistance in neighbouring, undamaged plants. Although this form of plant signalling has been reported in more than 30 plant species, there is still a considerable knowledge gap on how abiotic factors (e.g., water availability) alter its outcomes. We performed a greenhouse experiment to test for communication between potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) in response to herbivory by the generalist insect Spodoptera exigua and whether communication was affected by water availability. We paired emitter and receiver potato plants, with half of the emitters damaged by S. exigua larvae and half serving as undamaged controls. Both emitter and receiver plants were subjected to one of two water availability treatments: high (i.e., well-watered) vs. low (i.e., reduced watering) availability, thus effectively teasing apart water availability effects on the emission and reception components of signalling. After four days of herbivore feeding, we collected emitter VOCs and receivers were subjected to feeding by S. exigua to test for effects of signalling on induced resistance. Herbivory by S. exigua led to increased VOCs emissions as well as changes in VOCs composition in emitter plants. Furthermore, emitters subjected to low water availability exhibited a weaker induction of VOCs in response to herbivory relative to well-watered emitters. Results from the feeding bioassay indicated that receivers exposed to VOCs from herbivore-induced emitters showed lower S. exigua damage (i.e. higher induced resistance) compared to receivers exposed to undamaged emitters. However, we did not observe a significant effect of water availability in either emitters or receivers on plant communication. Overall, our study contributes to the understanding of how the abiotic context affects plant communication by providing evidence of water availability effects on the induction of VOCs that may act as airborne signals between plants. The observed changes in induced VOCs had no visible consequences for plant communication. These findings thus suggest that the induction of key compounds mediating communication was not compromised by our experimental conditions., Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades, Award: RTI2018-099322-B-I00. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Award: 2021AEP082. Xunta de Galicia, Award: IN607A 2021/03. Xunta de Galicia, Award: IN606B 2021/004., Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276488
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276488
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276488
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276488
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276488
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276488
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276488
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276488

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276627
Dataset

CHROMATOGRAPHIC DATA FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SULFONAMIDES IN WATERS ASSOCIATED TO FIG. 7 (IN CSV) OF THE PAPER &QUOT;PREPARATION AND FURTHER EVALUATION OF L-MENTHOL-BASED NATURAL DEEP EUTECTIC SOLVENTS AS SUPPORTED LIQUID MEMBRANE FOR THE HOLLOW FIBER LIQUID-PHASE MICROEXTRACTION OF SULFONAMIDES FROM ENVIRONMENTAL WATERS&QUOT; TO BE PUBLISHED IN ADVANCES IN SAMPLE PREPARATION

  • Díaz-Álvarez, Myriam
  • Martín-Esteban, Antonio
Data were automatically generated by the instrument., In this work, the use of a hydrophobic natural deep eutectic solvent (NADES) as supported liquid membrane (SLM) for hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) of sulfonamides is proposed. The combination of formic acid:L-menthol (1:1) was selected as optimum. The optimized HF-LPME procedure was applied to the analysis of an artificial water containing humic acids, tap and river water samples by HPLC with UV detection at 268 nm. The chromatographic data associated to Fig.7 of paper published in Advances of Sample Preparation are provided as csv files as follows: Fig7Aa: Milli-Q water; Fig7Ab; artificial water; Fig7Ba: Tap water (a); Fig7Bb: Manzanares river; Fig7Bc: Jarama river. All the samples were spiked with selected sulfonamides at 10 µg/L concentration level., "Hacia un analisis medioambiental verde: nuevos disolventes, materiales y dispositivos (GREENNESS)" (Grant PID2021-122327OB-I00 funded by MCIN/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033 and by “ERDF A way of making Europe”)., Fig7Aa_Díaz-Álvarez and Martín-Esteban_SAMPRE.csv, Fig7Ab_Díaz-Álvarez and Martín-Esteban_SAMPRE.csv, Fig7Ba_Díaz-Álvarez and Martín-Esteban_SAMPRE.csv, Fig7Bb_Díaz-Álvarez and Martín-Esteban_SAMPRE.csv, Fig7Bc_Díaz-Álvarez and Martín-Esteban_SAMPRE.csv, Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276627
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276627
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276627
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276627
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276627
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276627
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/276627
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/276627

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/277378
Dataset

DATASET OF CANTABRIAN MOUNTAINS INSECTS, STUCK ON TOP OF A MOUNTAIN: CONSEQUENCES OF DISPERSAL LIMITATIONS FOR ALPINE DIVERSITY. DATASET

  • Laiolo, Paola
  • Illera, Juan Carlos
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (CGL2017-85191-P/AEI/FEDER.UE, PID2020-115259GB-I00 by MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033) and Principado de Asturias (IDI/2021/000075), Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/277378, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14717
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/277378
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/277378, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14717
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/277378
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/277378, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14717
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/277378
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/277378, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14717
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/277378

RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1105
Dataset

CVCVZCVCZVZCV, VCVCZVCZVVCZVVCV

  • fsdfsdff, vvcvcxvcxvv
cxvcxvcxvcxv, cvvcvcvcvc, vcvcvzcvczxvc

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10953/1105
RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1105
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10953/1105
RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1105
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10953/1105
RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1105
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10953/1105
RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1105

RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1040
Dataset

ENCUESTAS REALIZADAS AL GRUPO DE CONTROL 1

  • Navarrete, Jose

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10953/1040
RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1040
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10953/1040
RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1040
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10953/1040
RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1040
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10953/1040
RUJA. Repositorio Institucional de la Producción Científica de la Universidad de Jaén
oai:ruja.ujaen.es:10953/1040

Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:166606
Dataset

BRAIN METABOLIC PATTERN ANALYSIS USING A MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTRA CLASSIFICATION SOFTWARE IN EXPERIMENTAL STROKE

  • Jiménez Xarrié, Elena
Unprocessed raw data for each spectrum is included as a supplementary material (including water unsuppressed files), Ajuts: EU FEDER funds Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa Sanitaria RETICS-INVICTUS-RD12/014/0002

Proyecto: //
DOI: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/166606
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:166606
HANDLE: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/166606
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:166606
PMID: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/166606
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:166606
Ver en: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/166606
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:166606

Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:182292
Dataset

NOTICIAS DE GOOGLE NEWS EDICIONES BRASIL, COLOMBIA, MÉXICO Y PORTUGAL, 2015

  • Cobos, Tania Lucía
Los recursos económicos para esta tesis doctoral provinieron de la Convocatoria 617 de 2013 Doctorados en el Exterior de COLCIENCIAS (Colombia), Los datos se pueden utilizar citando, además del nombre de la autora, el título de la tesis doctoral a la que pertenecen: "Medios de comunicación iberoamericanos y agregadores de noticias: análisis a las ediciones de Google News Brasil, Colombia, España, México y Portugal", En total son cuatro datasets, cada uno corresponde a las noticias capturadas del agregador de noticias Google News ediciones Brasil, Colombia, México y Portugal, que se utilizaron para la tesis doctoral "Medios de comunicación iberoamericanos y agregadores de noticias: análisis a las ediciones de Google News Brasil, Colombia, España, México y Portugal". Estas noticias fueron capturadas de forma automatizada por un scraper bot diseñado para ello, en el periodo comprendido entre el 1 de enero al 31 de marzo de 2015 (hora de España peninsular). En total son algo más de 5 millones de noticias, aparecen repetidas varias de ellas ya que esta era una variable requerida para la investigación inicial. Los campos capturados son: edición, titular, sumario (si lo hay), más popular (si o no), url, nombre del medio, y otros de asignación interna del scraper bot. Los datos deben ser revisados antes de proceder a usarse.

Proyecto: //
DOI: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/182292
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:182292
HANDLE: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/182292
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:182292
PMID: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/182292
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:182292
Ver en: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/182292
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:182292

Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:194390
Dataset

WHAT DOES A ZERO MEAN? UNDERSTANDING FALSE, RANDOM AND STRUCTURAL ZEROS IN ECOLOGY

  • Blasco-Moreno, Anabel
  • Pérez-Casany, Marta
  • Puig, Pedro
  • Morante, Maria
  • Castells, Eva
Data Description

Proyecto: //
DOI: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/194390
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:194390
HANDLE: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/194390
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:194390
PMID: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/194390
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:194390
Ver en: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/194390
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:194390

Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:196007
Dataset

EUROPEAN-ICEMAP250 SEA ICE EXTENT MAPS (2000-2017)

  • Parera-Portell, Joan A.
  • Ubach, Raquel
This dataset contains March and September monthly sea ice extent maps covering the European Arctic and the Baltic Sea at 250 m resolution (2000-2017). Additionally, it contains sea ice presence likelihood maps (% of observations) used to derive sea ice extent. This dataset has been produced with a modified version of the IceMap250 algorithm from MODIS visible and infrared data. Credits for the original algorithm: Gignac et al., 2017. For scientific, management, and monitoring purposes. Re-use of this content for commercial or non-commercial purposes is permitted provided that the source is acknowledged. The authors accept no responsibility or liability whatsoever for the re-use of this dataset.

Proyecto: //
DOI: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/196007
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:196007
HANDLE: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/196007
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:196007
PMID: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/196007
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
oai:ddd.uab.cat:196007
Ver en: https://ddd.uab.cat/record/196007
Dipòsit Digital de Documents de la UAB
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