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Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278294
Dataset

DATA FROM: GREAT SPOTTED CUCKOO NESTLINGS HAVE NO ANTIPREDATORY EFFECT ON MAGPIE OR CARRION CROW HOST NESTS IN SOUTHERN SPAIN

  • Soler, Manuel
  • Neve, Liesbeth de
  • Roldán, María
  • Pérez-Contreras, Tomás
  • Soler, Juan José
Host defences against cuckoo parasitism and cuckoo trickeries to overcome them are a classic example of antagonistic coevolution. Recently it has been reported that this relationship may turn to be mutualistic in the case of the carrion crow (Corvus corone) and its brood parasite, the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius), given that experimentally and naturally parasitized nests were depredated at a lower rate than non-parasitized nests. This result was interpreted as a consequence of the antipredatory properties of a fetid cloacal secretion produced by cuckoo nestlings, which presumably deters predators from parasitized host nests. This potential defensive mechanism would therefore explain the detected higher fledgling success of parasitized nests during breeding seasons with high predation risk. Here, in a different study population, we explored the expected benefits in terms of reduced nest predation in naturally and experimentally parasitized nests of two different host species, carrion crows and magpies (Pica pica). During the incubation phase non-parasitized nests were depredated more frequently than parasitized nests. However, during the nestling phase, parasitized nests were not depredated at a lower rate than non-parasitized nests, neither in magpie nor in carrion crow nests, and experimental translocation of great spotted cuckoo hatchlings did not reveal causal effects between parasitism state and predation rate of host nests. Therefore, our results do not fit expectations and, thus, do not support the fascinating possibility that great spotted cuckoo nestlings could have an antipredatory effect for host nestlings, at least in our study area. We also discuss different possibilities that may conciliate these with previous results, but also several alternative explanations, including the lack of generalizability of the previously documented mutualistic association., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278294
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278294
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278294
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278294
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278294
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278294
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278294
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278294

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278300
Dataset

DATA FROM: SIZE, AGE, AND HABITAT DETERMINE EFFECTIVENESS OF PALAU'S MARINE PROTECTED AREAS

  • Friedlander, Alan M.
  • Golbuu, Yimnang
  • Ballesteros, Enric
  • Caselle, Jennifer E.
  • Gouezo, Marine
  • Olsudong, Dawnette
  • Sala, Enric
Usage Notes: Palau_fishdata_Dryad Palau fish data Palau_benthicdata_Dryad, Palau has a rich heritage of conservation that has evolved from the traditional moratoria on fishing, or "bul", to more western Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), while still retaining elements of customary management and tenure. In 2003, the Palau Protected Areas Network (PAN) was created to conserve Palau's unique biodiversity and culture, and is the country's mechanism for achieving the goals of the Micronesia Challenge (MC), an initiative to conserve ?30% of near-shore marine resources within the region by 2020. The PAN comprises a network of numerous MPAs within Palau that vary in age, size, level of management, and habitat, which provide an excellent opportunity to test hypotheses concerning MPA design and function using multiple discreet sampling units. Our sampling design provided a robust space for time comparison to evaluate the relative influence of potential drivers of MPA efficacy. Our results showed that no-take MPAs had, on average, nearly twice the biomass of resource fishes (i.e. those important commercially, culturally, or for subsistence) compared to nearby unprotected areas. Biomass of non-resource fishes showed no differences between no-take areas and areas open to fishing. The most striking difference between no-take MPAs and unprotected areas was the more than 5-fold greater biomass of piscivorous fishes in the MPAs compared to fished areas. The most important determinates of no-take MPA success in conserving resource fish biomass were MPA size and years of protection. Habitat and distance from shore had little effect on resource fish biomass. The extensive network of MPAs in Palau likely provides important conservation and tourism benefits to the Republic, and may also provide fisheries benefits by protecting spawning aggregation sites, and potentially through adult spillover., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278300
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278300
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278300
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278300
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278300
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278300
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278300
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278300

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278324
Dataset

DATA FROM: NULL ALLELES ARE UBIQUITOUS AT MICROSATELLITE LOCI IN THE WEDGE CLAM (DONAX TRUNCULUS)

  • Rico, Ciro
  • Cuesta, José A.
  • Drake, Pilar
  • Macpherson, Enrique
  • Bernatchez, Louis
  • Marie, Amandine D.
Usage Notes: Databases used for the analyses. We provide three databases: the database we used for the analyses (16 loci), the database with the original annealing temperature (10 loci), and the database with the new annealing temperature (10 loci). Dataset-PeerJ.xlsx, Recent studies have reported an unusually high frequency of nonamplifying alleles at microsatellite loci in bivalves. Null alleles have been associated with heterozygous deficits in many studies. While several studies have tested for its presence using different analytical tools, few have empirically tested for its consequences in estimating population structure and differentiation. We characterised 16 newly developed microsatellite loci and show that null alleles are ubiquitous in the wedge clam, Donax trunculus. We carried out several tests to demonstrate that the large heterozygous deficits observed in the newly characterised loci were most likely due to null alleles. We tested the robustness of microsatellite genotyping for population assignment by showing that well-recognised biogeographic regions of the south Atlantic and south Mediterranean coast of Spain harbour genetically different populations., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278324
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278324
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278324
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278324
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278324
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278324
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278324
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278324

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278329
Dataset

DATA FROM: GENERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF PREDATION HOTSPOTS OF A FUNCTIONALLY IMPORTANT HERBIVORE IN A PATCHY HABITAT MOSAIC

  • Farina, Simone
  • Oltra, Aitana
  • Boada, Jordi
  • Bartumeus, Frederic
  • Pozueta Romero, Javier
  • Alcoverro, Teresa
Usage Notes: dataset of Generation and maintenance of predation hotspots of a functionally important herbivore in a patchy habitat mosaic Data file contains values for each patch of the accumulated predation rate after 5 days and 10 days of the experiment (response variable) and of the attributes at patch and landscape levels (z-score of HSA) used as predictor in the Multi-model averaging selection. Bold numbers evidence patches where high aggregations of predation risk occurred (predation hotspots). dataset.xlsx, 1. By modifying how critical ecosystem functions are distributed across the landscape, the spatial configuration and characteristics of patches can play a strong role in structuring communities. In strongly predator-controlled ecosystems, this patchy distribution of function can have complex downstream consequences, subjecting some areas to disproportionately high rates of predation, leaving other areas susceptible to herbivore outbreaks. 2. In this study we assess how spatial attributes at patch and landscape scales potentially influence the spatial and temporal distribution of predation on a functionally important herbivore in a patchy Mediterranean marine macrophyte community characterized by strong top-down control. 3. We experimentally tracked how predation risk of tethered sea urchins varied across space over a 10-day period in a patchy seagrass meadow. We related these patterns with patch and landscape-level attributes across the habitat mosaic. 4. At the level of the patch, predation risk was highest in seagrass patches with low canopies, without access to sheltering rocks. Scaling up to the landscape mosaic however, predation risk increased in dense aggregations of patches with high perimeter-to-area ratios close to rocky habitats. Predation aggregated in spatially-explicit hotspots and coldspots that were maintained through time. Interestingly, this pattern of predation risk correlated well with the natural abundance of sea urchins. 5. Our results show that spatial patch configuration can be a strong mediator of top trophic functions in marine ecosystems, causing significant clumping in the way predation – and therefore herbivory – are distributed across space. Given the importance of top-down control for these shallow marine ecosystems, it is crucial to incorporate landscape attributes in understanding the impact of functionally important herbivores on highly fragmented habitats., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278341
Dataset

DATA FROM: A PRIORITISED LIST OF INVASIVE ALIEN SPECIES TO ASSIST THE EFFECTIVE IMPLEMENTATION OF EU LEGISLATION

  • Carboneras, Carles
  • Genovesi, Piero
  • Vilà, Montserrat
  • Blackburn, Tim M.
  • Carrete, Martina
  • Clavero, Miguel
  • D'Hondt, Bram
  • Orueta, Jorge F.
  • Gallardo, Belinda
  • Geraldes, Pedro
  • González-Moreno, Pablo
  • Greogory, Richard D.
  • Nentwing, Wolfgang
  • Paquet, Jean-Yves
  • Pyšek, Petr
  • Rabitsch, Wolfgang
  • Ramírez, Iván
  • Scalera, Riccardo
  • Tella, José Luis
  • Walton, Paul
  • Wynde, Robin
Prioritised list of invasive alien species in the European Union, according to the year when a risk assessment should be available, with an indication of the sources of information used for review. Contains 1323 species assessed for their potential inclusion in the EU list of invasive species of Union concern, based on their maximum reported impact (from databases and literature) and their invasion history in Europe. JPECarbonerasST2.xlsx, 1. Effective prevention and control of invasive species generally relies on a comprehensive, coherent and representative list of species that enables resources to be used optimally. European Union (EU) Regulation 1143/2014 on invasive alien species (IAS) aims to control or eradicate priority species, and to manage pathways to prevent the introduction and establishment of new IAS; it applies to species considered of Union concern and subject to formal risk assessment. So far, 49 species have been listed but the criteria for selecting species for risk assessment have not been disclosed and were probably unsystematic. 2. We developed a simple method to systematically rank invasive alien species according to their maximum potential threat to biodiversity in the EU. We identified 1323 species as potential candidates for listing, and evaluated them against their invasion stages and reported impacts, using information from databases and scientific literature. 3. 900 species fitted the criteria for listing according to IAS Regulation. We prioritised 207 species for urgent risk assessment, 59 by 2018 and 148 by 2020, based on their potential to permanently damage native species or ecosystems; another 336 species were identified for a second phase (by 2025), to prevent or reverse their profound impacts on biodiversity; and a further 357 species for assessment by 2030. 4. Policy implications. We propose a systematic, proactive approach to selecting and prioritising invasive alien species for risk assessment to assist European Union policy implementation. We assess an unprecedented number of species with potential to harm EU biodiversity using simple methodology that we developed, and recommend which species should be considered for risk assessment in a ranked order of priority along the timeline 2018-2030, based on their maximum reported impact and their invasion history in Europe., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278341
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278341
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278341
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278341
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278341
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278341
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278341
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278341

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278354
Dataset

DATA FROM: PERSISTING IN DEFAUNATED LANDSCAPES: REDUCED PLANT POPULATION CONNECTIVITY AFTER SEED DISPERSAL COLLAPSE

  • Pérez-Méndez, Néstor
  • Jordano, Pedro
  • Valido, Alfredo
data_PerezMendez_Neochamaelea_populations_JEcol Genetic distances among populations of N. pulverulenta in Gran Canaria, Tenerife and La Gomera (Euclidean genetic distances, GD; conditional genetic distance, cGD), and isolation by resistances values for: topographic complexity, potential and current vegetation, climate, non-resistance, and range shape of N. pulverulenta, 1. Defaunation of large-bodied frugivores could be causing severe losses of crucial ecosystem functions such as seed dispersal. The immediate ecological consequences may include alteration or even collapse of seed-mediated gene flow affecting plant population connectivity, with impacts on the regional scale distribution of genetic variation. Yet these far-reaching consequences of defaunation remain understudied. 2. Here we tested whether human-induced defaunation of the Canarian frugivorous lizards (Gallotia, Lacertidae) altered within-island population connectivity and the amount and large-scale distribution of genetic variation of Neochamaelea pulverulenta (Rutaceae), which relies exclusively on these lizards for seed dispersal. Our study system defines a lizard downsizing gradient with three contrasted ecological scenarios (islands) with relatively optimal (Gran Canaria; large-sized lizards), sub-optimal (Tenerife; medium) and collapsed seed dispersal processes (La Gomera; small). We extensively sampled individual plant genotypes from 80 populations spanning the full geographic range of the plant to examine their genetic diversity, population-genetic network topologies, and the patterns of isolation both by distance (IBD) and resistance (IBR) across these three ecological scenarios. 3. Plant genetic diversity appeared unaffected by defaunation-mediated downsizing of frugivorous lizards. However, we found a reduced overall plant population connectivity together with an increased isolation by distance within the most defaunated islands (La Gomera and, to a lesser extent, Tenerife) when compared with the scenario preserving the functionality of lizard-mediated seed dispersal (Gran Canaria). The results, with a significant effect of lizard downsizing, were robust when controlling for biotic/abiotic differences among the three islands by means of isolation by resistance models (IBR). 4. Synthesis. Our results provide valuable insights into the far-reaching consequences of the deterioration of mutualisms on plant population dynamics over very large spatial scales. Conservation of large-bodied frugivores is thus essential because their irreplaceable mutualistic dispersal services maintain an extensive movement of seeds across the landscape, crucial for maintaining the genetic cohesiveness of metapopulations and the adaptive potential of plant species across their entire geographic range., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278371
Dataset

DATA FROM: POOR PLANT PERFORMANCE UNDER SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE IS LINKED TO MYCORRHIZAL RESPONSES IN A SEMIARID SHRUBLAND

  • León-Sánchez, Lupe
  • Nicolás, Emilio
  • Goberna, Marta
  • Prieto, Iván
  • Maestre, Fernando T.
  • Querejeta, José Ignacio
Usage Notes: Dataset for León-Sánchez et al. Journal of Ecology Data was collected in a field climate change simulation experiment in Aranjuez, in central Spain (40°02′N–3°32′W, 495 m altitude). The dataset includes leaf gas exchange measurements, isotopic C composition, leaf nutrients (P, N), leaf morphological traits, plant biomass, plant survival and mycorrhizal fungi relative abundances. León-Sánchez_etal_dataset.xlsx, 1.Warmer and drier conditions associated with ongoing climate change will increase abiotic stress for plants and mycorrhizal fungi in drylands worldwide, thereby potentially reducing vegetation cover and productivity and increasing the risk of land degradation and desertification. Rhizosphere microbial interactions and feedbacks are critical processes that could either mitigate or aggravate the vulnerability of dryland vegetation to forecasted climate change. 2.We conducted a four-year manipulative study in a semiarid shrubland in the Iberian Peninsula to assess the effects of warming (~2.5°C; W), rainfall reduction (~30%; RR) and their combination (W+RR) on the performance of native shrubs (Helianthemum squamatum) and their associated mycorrhizal fungi. 3.Warming (W and W+RR) decreased the net photosynthetic rates of H. squamatum shrubs by ~31% despite concurrent increases in stomatal conductance (~33%), leading to sharp decreases (~50%) in water use efficiency. Warming also advanced growth phenology, decreased leaf nitrogen and phosphorus contents per unit area, reduced shoot biomass production by ~36% and decreased survival during a dry year in both W and W+RR plants. Plants under RR showed more moderate decreases (~10-20%) in photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and shoot growth. 4.Warming, RR and W+RR altered ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) community structure and drastically reduced the relative abundance of EMF sequences obtained by high-throughput sequencing, a response associated with decreases in the leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and dry matter contents of their host plants. In contrast to EMF, the community structure and relative sequence abundances of other non-mycorrhizal fungal guilds were not significantly affected by the climate manipulation treatments. 5.Synthesis: Our findings highlight the vulnerability of both native plants and their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi to climate warming and drying in semiarid shrublands, and point to the importance of a deeper understanding of plant-soil feedbacks to predict dryland vegetation responses to forecasted aridification. The interdependent responses of plants and ectomycorrhizal fungi to warming and rainfall reduction may lead to a detrimental feedback loop on vegetation productivity and nutrient pool size, which could amplify the adverse impacts of forecasted climate change on ecosystem functioning in EMF-dominated drylands., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278380
Dataset

DATA FROM: CONTRASTS IN THE MARINE ECOSYSTEM OF TWO MACARONESIAN ISLANDS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN THE REMOTE SELVAGENS RESERVE AND MADEIRA ISLAND

  • Friedlander, Alan M.
  • Ballesteros, Enric
  • Clemente, Sabrina
  • Gonçalves, Emanuel J.
  • Estep, Andrew
  • Rose, Paul
  • Sala, Enric
Selvagens_Madeira_fish_data Collected in the field, Excel, abbreviations in Readme file Selvagens_Madeira_benthic_data collected in the field, Excel, abbreviations in Readme file Selvagens_Madeira_mobile_inverts collected in the field, Excel, abbreviations in Readme file, The islands of Madeira and Selvagens are less than 300 km apart but offer a clear contrast between a densely populated and highly developed island (Madeira), and a largely uninhabited and remote archipelago (Selvagens) within Macaronesia in the eastern Atlantic. The Madeira Archipelago has ~260,000 inhabitants and receives over six million visitor days annually. The Selvagens Islands Reserve is one of the oldest nature reserves in Portugal and comprises two islands and several islets, including the surrounding shelf to a depth of 200 m. Only reserve rangers and a small unit of the maritime police inhabit these islands. The benthic community around Selvagens was dominated by erect and turf algae, while the community at Madeira was comprised of crustose coralline and turf algae, sessile invertebrates, and sea urchin barrens. The sea urchin Diadema africanum was 65% more abundant at Madeira than at Selvagens. Total fish biomass was 3.2 times larger at Selvagens than at Madeira, and biomass of top predators was more than 10 times larger at Selvagens. Several commercially important species (e.g., groupers, jacks), which have been overfished throughout the region, were more common and of larger size at Selvagens than at Madeira. Important sea urchin predators (e.g., hogfishes, triggerfishes) were also in higher abundance at Selvagens compared to Madeira. The effects of fishing and other anthropogenic influences are evident around Madeira. This is in stark contrast to Selvagens, which harbors healthy benthic communities with diverse algal assemblages and high fish biomass, including an abundance of large commercially important species. The clear differences between these two island groups highlights the importance of expanding and strengthening the protection around Selvagens, which harbors one of the last intact marine ecosystems in the North Atlantic, and the need to increase management and protection around Madeira., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278384
Dataset

DATA FROM: PRIORITIZING SITES FOR ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION BASED ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

  • Comín, Francisco A.
  • Miranda, Beatriz
  • Sorando, Ricardo
  • Felipe-Lucia, María R.
  • Jiménez, Juan J.
  • Navarro, Enrique
Table S4. Average ES values for each LULC type. Average ES values for each LULC type. (See Table S1 for the description of the LULC types and Table S2 for units). Table S4.docx Table S1. Description of Land Use Land Cover (LULC) types identified at the River Piedra watershed. Description of Land Use Land Cover (LULC) types identified at the River Piedra watershed. Table S1.docx Table S2.Ecosystem services assessed, indicators and source of information. Ecosystem services assessed, indicators and source of information. Table S2_ok.docx, 1. Restoration ecology is moving towards designing restoration actions to maximize ecosystem services (ES). Such restoration actions require planning at large spatial scales, as these are often more meaningful for ecosystem functioning and ES supply. As economic resources to undertake ecological restoration at large scales are scarce, prioritizing sites to enhance multiple ES supply is critical. 2. Our study presents an index, the Relative Aggregated Value of ES (RAVES), to prioritize sites for ecological restoration based on the assessment of multiple ES. We tested the spatial heterogeneity of ES to identify the relevant scale to managing ES and to applying the RAVES index using a local case study. We also used the RAVES index to compare three alternative restoration scenarios to enhance ES based on the availability of socio-economic resources. 3. The highest RAVES values were found in areas with natural vegetation and in gorges with riparian forests. The lowest RAVES values were found in crop fields, steep slopes, and river stretches without riparian forest. 4. The multi-scale spatial analysis indicated that most ES showed significant heterogeneity at multiple spatial scales, especially at broad (20–30 km) and very broad (40–50 km) scales. However, at spatial scales smaller than 2 km, only biological control showed significant heterogeneity. 5. The optimal socio-economic conditions to enhance ES supply were met in a scenario where both private and public land and economic funds were available to implement ecological restoration. As most areas with low RAVES were in private lands, even with scarce economic funds restoration of private lands would result in a large increase of RAVES. 6. Synthesis and applications. The RAVES index is a practical tool to hierarchically prioritize sites for ecological restoration across large spatial scales. When linked to scenario analysis, the RAVES index can also be used to identify optimal management scenarios. By linking ES assessments to the identification of the spatial scales at which ES show largest heterogeneity, our analyses can help decision-makers identifying the spatial scale at which ES are more likely to respond to management and highlight the need to integrate local and regional management plans.09-Nov-2017, Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278437
Dataset

SMOS L3 SURFACE SOIL MOISTURE BINNED MAPS AT 25 KM EASE-2 (V.4.0) [DATASET]

  • Pablos, Miriam
  • González-Haro, Cristina
  • Portal, Gerard
  • Piles, María
  • Vall-llossera, Mercè
  • Portabella, Marcos
Data acquisition: Satellite: ESA SMOS mission (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity). Filenames: BEC_SM____SMOS__GLO_L3__X_YYYYMMDDTHHMMSS_025km_TT_____v4.0.nc, being: - X the half-orbit type (A for ascending and D for descending), - YYYYMMDDTHHMMSS the central date (year, month, day, hour, minute and second) in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) of the period covered by the file, - TT: indicates the temporal coverage of the data file (1d, 3d, 9d, 1m and 1y for daily, 3 days, 9 days, 1 month and 1 year, respectively). Sensor: Satellite SMOS / MIRAS. Spatial resolution: 25 km x 25 km. Spatial grid: WGS_84 / EASE2_M25km, Improvement of the current SMOS soil moisture products produced by the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC) and development of new added-value products and/or applications over land, INTERACT. Enfoques sinergéticos para una nueva generación de productos y aplicaciones de observación de la Tierra (PID2020-114623RB-C31). Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación a través de PN2020 - PROY I+D+I – Programa Estatal de I+D+I Orientada a los Retos de la Sociedad – Plan Estatal de Investigación Científica Técnica y de Innovación 2017-2020, · Surface soil moisture (SM) · Data quality index of surface soil moisture (SM_DQX) · Variance of surface soil moisture (SM_VARIANCE) · Number of L2 soil moisture measures (N_SM) · Vegetation optical depth at nadir (VOD) · Data quality index of vegetation optical depth at nadir (VOD_DQX) · Variance of vegetation optical depth at nadir (VOD_VARIANCE) · Number of L2 vegetation optical depth measures (N_VOD) · Time (time) · Latitude (lat) · Longitude (lon) · Coordinate reference system (crs), Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278437, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14722
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278437
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278437, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14722
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278437
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278437, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14722
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278437
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/278437, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14722
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/278437

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