Resultados totales (Incluyendo duplicados): 34416
Encontrada(s) 3442 página(s)
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283288
Dataset. 2021

INFERRING INDIVIDUAL FATE FROM AQUATIC ACOUSTIC TELEMETRY DATA

  • Villegas Ríos, David
  • Freitas, Carla
  • Moland, Even
  • Huneide Thorbjørnsen, Susanna
  • Olsen, Esben Moland
[Methods] There are three types of data: - Detection data: 1-3 files per fish - Fish information data: includes all the relevant information for each individual, e.g. when it was tagged, transmitter type, etc... - Receiver array information: includes the location of the receivers [Usage Notes] Metadata of the dataset: Villegas Ríos, David et al. (2021), Inferring individual fate from aquatic acoustic telemetry data, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2bvq83bn0 Detections data (all files starting with 9002 or 9004): Date and time: date and time of detection Receiver: name of the receiver Transmitter: ID of the transmitter Transmitter name: empty Transmitter serial: serial number of the transmitter Sensor value: depth measure Sensor units: units of the depth measure (meters) Station name: name of the station where the receiver is places Latitude: latitude of the station Longitude: longitude of the station fishinformation.csv: all the columns are self-explained except the following: MinDelaySec: minimum delay of the transmitter, in seconds. MaxDelaySec: maximum delay of the transmitter, in seconds. Release_lat_geo: release latitude, in geographic coordinates. Release_lon_geo: release longitude, in geographic coordinates. array_information.csv: all the columns are self-explained except the following: deploymentdatetime_timestamp: date of deployment of any particular receiver. recoverydatetime_timestamp: date of recovery of any particular receiver. lat_geo: latitude of the receiver location, in geographic coordinates. lon_geo: longitude of the receiver location, in geographic coordinates. lat_utm: latitude of the receiver location, in UTM. lon_utm: longitude of the receiver location, in UTM, Acoustic telemetry has become a popular means of obtaining individual behavioural data from a wide array of species in marine and freshwater systems. Fate information is crucial to understand important aspects of population dynamics such as mortality, predation or dispersal rates. Here we present a method to infer individual fate from acoustic telemetry arrays of receivers with overlapping detection ranges. Our method depends exclusively on information on animal movements and the characteristics and configuration of the telemetry equipment. By answering a limited number of simple questions, our method identifies six different fates: tagging mortality, natural mortality, fishing mortality, predation, dispersal and survival. Applying the method to a cod telemetry dataset, we were able to determine fate for 97% of the individuals. We validate the results using several external sources of information, such as recaptures from fishers and control fish with known fate. The method is readily applicable to a wide array of species with minimal adjustments, expanding the range of hypotheses that can be tested using telemetry data., H2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions, Award: 793627., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: EC/H2020/793627

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283295
Dataset. 2021

PLANT COMMUNITY DATA FOR EUROPEAN ECOREGIONS

  • Capitán, José A.
  • Cuenda, Sara
  • Ordóñez, Alejandro
  • Alonso, David
[Methods] DATASETS: ABUN.Herba.csv: Plant community data were drawn from Atlas Florae Europaeae (AFE, Jalas & Suominen, 1964-1999). The distribution of flora is geographically described using equally-sized grid cells based on the Universal Transverse Mercator projection and the Military Grid Reference System. Each cell was assigned to a dominant habitat type based on the WWF Biomes of the World classification (Olson et al., 2001), which defines different ecoregions. We consider each cell in an ecoregion to represent a species aggregation. TRAIT.Herba.csv: Mean height values were obtained from the LEDA database (Kleyer et al., 2008) for as many species as there were available in the database. Most of the missing values were taken from (Ordonez et al., 2010), and some of them inferred using a MICE (Multivariate Imputation by Chained Equations) approach (Buuren & Groothuis-Oudshoorn, 2011). Based on plant growth forms, 2610 herbaceous species (aquatic, herbs, or graminoid) were considered in this dataset. MODIS_AET_mean.bil: Mean (annual) actual evapotranspiration maps were obtained from data estimated through remote sensing (Mu et al., 2011), which are publicly available in the MODIS project website (http://www.ntsg.umt.edu/project/modis/mod17.php). This data was put into a .bil format using QGIS. A map for European ecoregions is included in the file ecoregions.bil. CODE: Python code for replicability of the results is provided. randomize.py: performs randomization tests for each cell, by comparing with random samples taken from species in the corresponding ecoregion. It yields p-value distributions for each ecoregion, from which it is easy to compute height clustering indices. The variation of coexistence probabilities as function of competitive strengths can also be reproduced using the output file from this code. evapo_data.py: calculates ecoregional mean and std for actual evapotranspiration from MODIS data. Similar code can be used to obtain gross primary productivity averages. This code can be used to correlate AET with clustering indices and latitude. Note that this code can be easily adapted to obtain AET by cell instead of by ecoregion, using latitude and longitude defining each AFE cell., Patterns in macroecology are related to species occurrence across meaningful spatial and temporal scales. The dataset provided here reports species distribution data (presence-absence) for herbaceous plants across a number of European habitats (ecoregions). Species occurrence is accompanied by the corresponding plant's maximun stem height values. This dataset has been used to unveil patterns of herbaceous plant height clustering in mid-latitude European ecoregions. Presence-absence data for herbaceous plants were drawn from Atlas Florae Europaeae (Jalas & Suominen, 1964-1999). Associated to each species, a dominant habitat (ecoregion) was assigned according to the WWF Biomes of the World classification. Each herbaceous species in an ecoregion was characterized by its maximum stem height. Mean height values were obtained for different sources. In order to correlate clustering patterns with productivity measures, actual evapotranspiration (AET) data is also provided. AET maps were obtained from data estimated through remote sensing (Mu et al., 2011), which are publicly available in the MODIS project website (http://www.ntsg.umt.edu/project/modis/mod17.php). Plant distribution and trait data across Europe unveils a relation between plant height clustering and actual evapotranspiration. This clustering is most evident in mid-latitude ecoregions, where conditions for growth (reflected in actual evapotranspiration rates) are optimal. Away from this optimum, climate severity leads to non-significant height clustering in actual communities., Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad, Award: CGL2012-39964. Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad, Award: CGL2015-69043-P. Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades, Award: PGC2018-096577-B-I00. Banco Santander, Award: PR87/19-22582. Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad, Award: CGL2012-39964., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283313
Dataset. 2022

THE ORIGINS OF ASEXUAL BRINE SHRIMPS

  • Rode, Nicolas O.
  • Boyer, Loreleï
  • Flaven, E.
  • Hontoria, Francisco
  • Van Stappen, Gilbert
  • Dufresne, France
  • Haag, Christoph
  • Lenormand, Thomas
  • Jabbour-Zahab, Roula
[Methods] Flow cytometry of 147 individuals (+59 individuals from Nougué et al. 2015) COI sequencing of 336 individuals using primers 1/2COI_Fol-F and 1/2COI_Fol-R following the protocol of Muñoz et al. (2010). COI sequencing of 23 individuals using primers Co1APAR-F(5’-259 TTTGGAGCTTGAGCAGGAAT-3’) and Co1APAR-R(5’-260 TGCGGGATCAAAGAAAGAAG-3’). Genotyping of 432 individuals with a panel of 12 microsatellite markers (see Muñoz et al. 2008; Nougué et al. 2015 for details regarding markers and amplification protocol) [Usage Notes] See README files., Determining how and how often asexual lineages emerge within sexual species is central to our understanding of sex-asex transitions and the long-term maintenance of sex. Asexuality can arise “by transmission” from an existing asexual lineage to a new one, through different types of crosses. The occurrence of these crosses, cryptic sex, variation in ploidy and recombination within asexuals greatly complicates the study of sex-asex transitions, as they preclude the use of standard phylogenetic methods and genetic distance metrics. In this study we show how to overcome these challenges by developing new approaches to investigate the origin of the various asexual lineages of the brine shrimp Artemia parthenogenetica. We use a large sample of asexuals, including all known polyploids, and their sexual relatives. We combine flow cytometry with mitochondrial and nuclear DNA data. We develop new genetic distance measures and methods to compare various scenarios describing the origin of the different lineages. We find that all diploid and polyploid A. parthenogenetica likely arose within the last 80,000 years through successive and nested hybridization events that involved backcrosses with different sexual species. All A. parthenogenetica have the same common ancestor and therefore likely carry the same asexuality gene(s) and reproduce by automixis. These findings radically change our view of sex-asex transitions in this group, and show the importance of considering asexuality “by transmission” scenarios. The methods developed are applicable to many other asexual taxa., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283343
Dataset. 2022

FIRE FAVORS SEXUAL PRECOCITY IN A MEDITERRANEAN PINE

  • Guiote, Carmen
  • Pausas, J. G.
[Methods] We selected 13 sites dominated by Pinus halepensis trees in the Valencia region (eastern Spain) across a range of altitudes and climatic conditions. In each site, we established 4 transects, spaced by at least 100 m. In each transect, we haphazardly selected and georeferenced 10 trees, separated by at least 10 m. For each tree, we measured its basal diameter (10 cm above ground) and the distance to the two closest trees. Then, we compute the annual growth rate as the basal diameter (cm) divided by the age (years) and the average of the distances to the 2 closest trees. Afterward, we estimated the age of each tree by counting whorls. For reproductive trees, we also estimated the age of each cone following the same method of counting whorls (avoiding immature cone cohorts; i.e., the last or last two cohorts depending on the sampling season) and recorded whether they were open (non-serotinous), closed (serotinous cones), or from the last cohort considered (closed but serotiny unknown). The retention of branches and cones in this species allowed us to estimate the age of the young tree and its cones (even if they were open), and therefore the age at first reproduction (tree age - age of the first cone) and the total number of stored cones (i.e. closed cones; an estimation of the canopy seed bank) for each tree. Please see “materials and methods” section within the paper for more details., Wildfires are a natural disturbance in many ecosystems. Consequently, plant species have acquired traits that allow them to resist and regenerate in an environment with recurrent fires. A key trait in fire-prone ecosystems is the age at first reproduction (maturity age); populations of non-resprouting species cannot persist when fire interval is shorter than this age. Maturity age is variable among individuals, so we hypothesize that short fire intervals select for early seed production (precocity). We selected 13 plots with different fire regimes in eastern Spain, all dominated by Pinus halepensis (a non-resprouting serotinous species). Then, we evaluated the age at first reproduction and the size of the canopy seed bank of each individual pine. Our results show a significant effect of fire regime on the onset of reproduction in this species, suggesting a selection towards higher precocity in populations subject to shorter fire intervals. Due to this higher precocity, pines stored more cones, and therefore, increased their potential for post-fire regeneration. We provide the first field evidence that fire can act as a driver of precocity. Being precocious in fire-prone environments is adaptive because it increases the probability of having a significant seed bank when the next fire arrives., Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: PGC2018-096569-B-I00. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: FPU16/06412., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283348
Dataset. 2022

SALINITY EFFECTS ON SOIL P CYCLING

  • Hu, Minjie
  • Le, Yixun
  • Sardans, Jordi
  • Yan, Ruibing
  • Zhong, Yi
  • Sun, Dongyao
  • Tong, Chuan
  • Peñuelas, Josep
[Methods] The field experiments were conducted in the growing (July) and non-growing seasons (January) in both the freshwater and brackish C. malaccensis wetlands. Three 1 × 1 m quadrats (5 m apart) were randomly established at each site, and three soil cores (0–20 cm) were randomly collected in each quadrat and pooled into one sample. All samples were then stored in a portable refrigerator and immediately transported to the laboratory. The samples were homogenized and then split into two subsamples: one subsample was air-dried for the determination of P fractions and physicochemical parameters, and the other subsample was frozen at −80°C for DNA extraction. Plant biomasses were also collected during each season. We used the Hedley scheme of sequential extraction to estimate the fractions and availabilities of soil P (Hedley et al., 1982), which can effectively distinguish between Pi and Po. Briefly, soil samples were successively extracted using an anion-exchange resin (resin-P), 0.5 M NaHCO3 (NaHCO3-Pi and NaHCO3-Po), 0.1 M NaOH (NaOH-Pi and NaOH-Po), 0.1 M NaOH with sonication (NaOHs-Pi and NaOHs-Po), and 1 M HCl (HCl-Pi). The residual soils were then digested with 4 mL of H2SO4 and 1 mL of HClO4 (residual-P). The concentration of P was measured using a spectrophotometer. The P was further classified as labile P (resin-P, NaHCO3-Pi, and NaHCO3-Po), moderately labile P (NaOH-Pi and NaOH-Po), and stable P (NaOHs-Pi, NaOHs-Po, HCl-P, and residual-P) based on its availability to plants and microbes (Rodrigues et al., 2016). The salinity of the water was measured in situ using a salinometer (Oakton Instruments, Springfield, USA). Soil electric conductivity (EC) and pH were determined using a 2265FS EC meter (Spectrum Technologies Inc., Aurora, USA) and a pH meter (IQ Scientific Instruments, Carlsbad, USA), respectively. Soil moisture was evaluated by determining the amount of water lost at 105°C. Soil organic C (SOC) was analyzed using the dichromate oxidation method. Soil concentrations of total C (TC) and N (TN) were measured using an elemental analyzer (Elementar, Frankfurt, Germany). Soil concentrations of ammonium-N (NH4+-N) and nitrate-N (NO3−-N) were determined using flow-injection analysis (Skalar Analytical SAN++, Lachat, Netherland) and extraction with 2 M KCl. The soil texture was determined using a Mastersizer 2000 particle-size analyzer (Malvern Panalytical Ltd., Melvin, UK). Plant biomasses were measured by drying samples to constant weight at 70°C. Soil microbial DNA was extracted using an OMEGA DNA Kit following the manufacturer’s instructions. The quality and quantity of the extracted DNA were determined using a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, USA) and agarose gel electrophoresis, respectively. The extracted microbial DNA was processed, and metagenomic shotgun sequencing libraries were constructed with insert sizes of 400 bp using an Illumina TruSeq Nano DNA LT Library Preparation Kit. Each library was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq X-ten platform (Illumina, San Diego, USA) using the PE150 strategy at Personal Biotechnology Co., Ltd. (Shanghai, China). Please refer to the Supporting Information for more detailed descriptions (Appendix I). We obtained a total of 931 million qualified sequences from 12 metagenomes, ranging from 69 million to 88 million sequences per sample for downstream analyses (Table S1). [Usage Notes] The dataset can be opened using regular Office software., Accelerated sea-level rise is expected to cause the salinization of freshwater wetlands, but the responses to salinity of the availability of soil phosphorus (P) and of microbial genes involved in the cycling and transformation of P remain unexplored. Our results suggest that the P-cycling microbial community abundance and P availability respond positively to moderate increases in salinity by promoting the microbial solubilization and mineralization of soil P in brackish wetlands. Changes in microbial communities and microbially mediated P cycling may represent microbial strategies to adapt to moderate salinity levels, which in turn control soil function and nutrient balance., National Natural Science Foundation of China. Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province. Fundación Ramón Areces Project. Spanish Government. Catalan Government., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283352
Dataset. 2022

DATA FROM: FERTILISER APPLICATION MODULATES THE IMPACT OF INTERANNUAL CLIMATE FLUCTUATIONS AND PLANT-TO-PLANT INTERACTIONS ON THE DYNAMICS OF ANNUAL SPECIES IN A MEDITERRANEAN GRASSLAND

  • Valerio, Mercedes
  • Gazol Burgos, Antonio
  • Ripollés, María
  • Ibáñez, Ricardo
[Background] Climate and land-use changes, which include the application of various types of organic and inorganic fertilisers, have been reducing the species diversity of Mediterranean grasslands and threatening their conservation. Annual plants are one of the most diverse functional groups of species in these grasslands, despite suffering competitive pressure from perennial herbaceous and woody species, and they are essential for ecosystem functioning and stability., [Aims] To quantify how fertilisation modulates the impact of plant-to-plant interactions and climate fluctuations on the dynamics of annuals in Mediterranean grasslands. We hypothesised that the application of sewage sludge would increase competition between functional groups, reducing the abundance of annuals in the long-term, but would buffer the negative impacts of drought on the year-to-year fluctuation of the diversity of annuals., [Methods] In a semi-natural species-rich Mediterranean grassland in northern Spain, we analysed the changes in the taxonomical and functional composition and diversity of annuals over 14 years in response to variations in the abundance of perennial herbaceous and woody species, climate fluctuations, and fertilisation with sewage sludge. We quantified separately the patterns of year-to-year fluctuations and long-term trends., [Results] The frequency and diversity of annuals decreased with a higher abundance of perennial herbaceous species, drought in June, and cold winters. The addition of sewage sludge decreased the abundance of annuals in the long-term, seemed to promote competition between annuals and other functional groups at an interannual scale, and mitigated the negative effects of drought and cold., [Conclusions] Fertilisation influences differently the temporal response of annuals to climate fluctuations and plant-to-plant interactions., Fundación Caja Navarra, Award: ref. 10833 (Programa Tú Eliges, Tú Decides). Universidad de Navarra, Award: Project Biodiversity Data Analytics and Environmental Quality. Universidad de Navarra, Award: ROBIN (Red de Observatorios de la Biodiversidad de Navarra). Asociación de Amigos de la Universidad de Navarra, Award: Convocatoria de Ayudas para la Formación del Personal Investigador. Departamento de Educación, Gobierno de Navarra, Award: Ayudas predoctorales para la realización de programas de doctorado de interés para Navarra. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: RyC2020-030647-I. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Award: PIE-20223AT003., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283367
Dataset. 2022

DIVERGENT GROWTH-DIFFERENTIATION BALANCE STRATEGIES AND RESOURCE COMPETITION SHAPE MORTALITY PATTERNS IN PONDEROSA PINE

  • Ferrenberg, Scott
  • Vázquez-González, Carla
  • Lee, Steven
  • Kristupaitis, Milda
[Methods] See the associated manuscript for complete details. This data set contains measures of the size (diameter and height), competition neighborhood density, and measures of annual tree ring widths and resin duct traits for Ponderosa pines of southern New Mexico, USA. This data was collected using a paired design; tree pairs were selected for close proximity and similar size with one member of each pair being alive at the time of sampling and the other having been killed by bark beetles prior to the study. Annual climate data was retrieved from PRISM. [Usage Notes] The data are .csv format; metadata and details are in .txt files. No proprietary software is required to open and view the files., Dynamic resource availability leads to trade-offs among functions in plants. The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) predicts greater allocation of carbon to defense than growth when resources are scarce; with optimum defense production occurring at a point between the minimum and maximum growth rates. While the GDBH has been widely tested, consideration of phenotypic variation in rates for which defense is traded for growth and what this variation means for plant resistance remains rare. For defense, pines produce and store oleoresin in “resin ducts.” Retrospective comparisons of resin ducts in pines have revealed that trees with greater numbers, sizes, or areas of xylem resin ducts are more likely to avoid or survive insect attacks. We used tree ring chronologies to quantify phenotypic variation in growth and resin duct defenses in pairs of living and bark beetle-killed Pinus ponderosa trees in southern New Mexico, USA, and to test the utility of the GDBH for explaining tree mortality. We also assessed the sensitivity of annual growth to climate and competitor density in years preceding mortality in each pair. Survivors had greater growth rates and total cross-sectional areas of resin ducts than trees killed by bark beetles. We did not observe a difference in climate-growth relationships among the groups, however, trees killed by bark beetles suffered negative effects of competition while survivors did not. Growth-defense trade-offs conformed to the GDBH’s prediction of a quadratic relationship, however, the two groups significantly differed in the rate at which defense was traded for increasing levels of annual growth. Our results demonstrate that phenotypic variation in the trade-off between growth and defense could be used to characterize trees that were killed by or survived recent natural enemy epidemics. We hypothesize that the GDBH could be integrated with the characterization of phenotypic variation in growth-differentiation strategies—along with parsing of gene versus environment influences on phenotypes—at both local and landscape scales to increase our understanding of patterns of natural enemy impacts in plant populations., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283374
Dataset. 2019

DATA FROM: GLOBTHERM, A GLOBAL DATABASE ON THERMAL TOLERANCES FOR AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ORGANISMS

  • Bennett, Joanne M.
  • Calosi, Piero
  • Clusella-Trullas, Susana
  • Martínez, Brezo
  • Sunday, Jennifer
  • Algar, Adam C.
  • Araújo, Miguel B.
  • Hawkins, Bradford A.
  • Keith, Sally
  • Kühn, Ingolf
  • Rahbek, Carsten
  • Rodríguez, Laura
  • Singer, Alexander
  • Villalobos, Fabricio
  • Olalla-Tárraga, Miguel Ángel
  • Morales-Castilla, Ignacio
[Usage Notes] GlobTherm, a global database on thermal tolerances for aquatic and terrestrial organisms, Excel format This database includes thermal tolerance metrics for 2,133 species of multicellular algae, plants, fungi, and animals in 43 classes, 203 orders and 525 families from both aquatic, and terrestrial realms, extracted from published studies. Abbreviated citations are included in the 'REF_min' and 'REF_max' variable in the data file. For full citations, please see the attached workbook, "References_1_09_2017.xlsx". The data are available in both Excel and CSV formats in the Dryad Digital Repository (doi:10.5061/dryad.1cv08). Updates to the data and metadata will be curated through the iDiv data portal (https://idata.idiv.de/). For example, in the future we plan to include interspecific variation in the dataset, to provide multiple estimates of thermal tolerance limits for a given species where estimates determined using the best possible methods will be more highly ranked. GlobalTherm_upload_10_11_17.xlsx References_1_09_2017.xlsx GlobTherm, a global database on thermal tolerances for aquatic and terrestrial organisms, CSV format This database includes thermal tolerance metrics for 2,133 species of multicellular algae, plants, fungi, and animals in 43 classes, 203 orders and 525 families from both aquatic, and terrestrial realms, extracted from published studies. Abbreviated citations are included in the 'REF_min' and 'REF_max' variable in the data file. For full citations, please see the attached workbook, "References_1_09_2017.xlsx". The data are available in both Excel and CSV formats in the Dryad Digital Repository (doi:10.5061/dryad.1cv08). Updates to the data and metadata will be curated through the iDiv data portal (https://idata.idiv.de/). For example, in the future we plan to include interspecific variation in the dataset, to provide multiple estimates of thermal tolerance limits for a given species where estimates determined using the best possible methods will be more highly ranked. GlobalTherm_upload_02_11_17.csv References_1_09_2017.xlsx, How climate affects species distributions is a longstanding question receiving renewed interest owing to the need to predict the impacts of global warming on biodiversity. Is climate change forcing species to live near their critical thermal limits? Are these limits likely to change through natural selection? These and other important questions can be addressed with models relating geographical distributions of species with climate data, but inferences made with these models are highly contingent on non-climatic factors such as biotic interactions. Improved understanding of climate change effects on species will require extensive analysis of thermal physiological traits, but such data are scarce and scattered. To overcome current limitations, we created the GlobTherm database. The database contains experimentally derived species’ thermal tolerance data currently comprising over 2,000 species of terrestrial, freshwater, intertidal and marine multicellular algae, pl ants, fungi, and animals. The GlobTherm database will be maintained and curated by iDiv with the aim of expanding it, and enable further investigations on the effects of climate on the distribution of life on Earth., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283380
Dataset. 2019

DATA FROM: TRADE-OFFS AND SYNERGIES BETWEEN BIRD CONSERVATION AND WILDFIRE SUPPRESSION IN THE FACE OF GLOBAL CHANGE

  • Regos, Adrián
  • Hermoso, Virgilio
  • D'Amen, Manuela
  • Guisan, Antoine
  • Brotons, Lluís
[Usage Notes] Data files from Regos et al. (2018) These data files include the environmental suitability predicted from the SESAM framework for each bird species, under each run simulation and management scenario. It also includes the Natura 2000 network at 100 m and all remaining files required to run MARXAN simulations. Datafiles.zip, 1. The combined effects of climate change and other factors, such as land use change or fire disturbance, pose daunting challenges for biodiversity conservation worldwide. 2. In this study, we predicted the future effectiveness of the Natura 2000 (N2000), the current network of protected areas (PA) in Europe, at maintaining and representing suitable environmental conditions for a set of 79 bird species between 2000 and 2050 in a fire-prone area strongly affected by land abandonment processes in NE Spain. We then compared PA performance against a set of alternative priority areas for conservation, which take into account fire–vegetation dynamics, selected by using a conservation planning tool (MARXAN). Fire–vegetation dynamics were modelled using a process-based model (MEDFIRE MODEL) under alternative fire management and climate change scenarios. Bird assemblage distributions were predicted using the spatially-explicit species assemblage modelling frameworkSESAMusing distribution models from individual species that hierarchically integrate climate change and wildfire–vegetation dynamics. 3. The amount of suitable environmental conditions within the N2000 network was predicted to fall by around 15%, on average, over the next decades in relation to the initial conditions, but could be partially modulated by fire management policies in the near future. The efficiency of the current PA system was predicted to decrease from 17.4 to 15% over the next decades. However, a more efficient PA system could be achieved with a conservation planning approach that explicitly considers fire–vegetation dynamics and their management. 4. Synthesis and applications: Our findings shed light on: (1) how the current Natura 2000 might still hold an important bird conservation value by 2050; (2) how the relocation of some protected areas could be considered along the next decades to substantially increase bird conservation effectiveness; and (3) how the integration of fire-vegetation dynamics, fire management policies and their objectives within conservation planning can provide ‘win-win’ solutions for bird conservation and fire prevention in fire-prone abandoned landscapes., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283385
Dataset. 2019

DATA FROM: THE BALANCE OF CANOPY AND SOIL EFFECTS DETERMINES INTRASPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN FOUNDATION SPECIES’ EFFECTS ON ASSOCIATED PLANTS

  • Pistón Caballero, Nuria
  • Michalet, Richard
  • Schöb, Christian
  • Macek, Petr
  • Armas, Cristina
  • Pugnaire, Francisco I.
[Usage Notes] Piston_et_al_2018_Data.zip All data used to assess whether two contrasted canopy phenotypes (tight and loose) of the shrub Cytisus galianoi differed in their effects on the microhabitat and on subordinate plant community composition in a dry subalpine system. We also experimentally distinguished the relative contribution of above- (canopy) and below-ground (soil) effects of C. galianoi on the most frequent subordinate species, Festuca indigesta, as well as the reciprocal effects of F. indigesta on C. galianoi. Pistón_et_al_2018_Data.zip, 1. The impact of plant-plant interactions on species diversity patterns has been broadly addressed in stressful environments, such as alpine ecosystems, where foundation species promote species richness by creating habitat for other species. However, foundation species with contrasting phenotypes might modify the microhabitat differently, which would alter the subordinate community composition, and coincide with distinct feedback effects of those subordinate species on the foundation species. However, the precise interaction mechanisms that facilitate species are not fully understood, especially the relative contribution of above- and below-ground compartments of foundation species to subordinate species and the potential feedbacks they receive. 2. We explored whether two contrasted canopy phenotypes (tight and loose) of the shrub Cytisus galianoi differed in their effects on the microhabitat and on subordinate plant community composition in a dry subalpine system. We also experimentally distinguished the relative contribution of above- (canopy) and below-ground (soil) effects of C. galianoi on the most frequent subordinate species, Festuca indigesta, as well as the reciprocal effects of F. indigesta on C. galianoi. 3. We performed observational and manipulative experiments to assess the influence of phenotypic differences of the shrub on understory microhabitat and subordinate plant community composition. Reciprocal effects were assessed by removing either F. indigesta from the understory of the two shrub phenotypes or the C. galianoi canopy from the immediate vicinity of F. indigesta. 4. The two C. galianoi phenotypes differed in mean values of functional traits (like stem density or plant height), modified their understory microhabitats differently, and hosted distinct subordinate communities. Loose phenotypes had more positive effects on community composition and diversity than tight phenotypes. Additionally, tight phenotypes simultaneously showed both more positive aboveground and more negative belowground effects on F. indigesta than loose phenotypes. There were no significant feedback effects of F. indigesta on C. galianoi. 5. The two phenotypes of the foundation species C. galianoi showed contrasting effects on the subordinate plant community: compared to the tight phenotype, the loose phenotype had higher associated species diversity and reduced reciprocal interaction intensities above- and below-ground with the subordinate species F. indigesta. This highlights the impact of phenotypic variation for plant interactions and community-level diversity., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

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