Resultados totales (Incluyendo duplicados): 33785
Encontrada(s) 3379 página(s)
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283348
Dataset. 2022

SALINITY EFFECTS ON SOIL P CYCLING

  • Hu, Minjie
  • Le, Yixun
  • Sardans, Jordi
  • Yan, Ruibing
  • Zhong, Yi
  • Sun, Dongyao
  • Tong, Chuan
  • Peñuelas, Josep
[Methods] The field experiments were conducted in the growing (July) and non-growing seasons (January) in both the freshwater and brackish C. malaccensis wetlands. Three 1 × 1 m quadrats (5 m apart) were randomly established at each site, and three soil cores (0–20 cm) were randomly collected in each quadrat and pooled into one sample. All samples were then stored in a portable refrigerator and immediately transported to the laboratory. The samples were homogenized and then split into two subsamples: one subsample was air-dried for the determination of P fractions and physicochemical parameters, and the other subsample was frozen at −80°C for DNA extraction. Plant biomasses were also collected during each season. We used the Hedley scheme of sequential extraction to estimate the fractions and availabilities of soil P (Hedley et al., 1982), which can effectively distinguish between Pi and Po. Briefly, soil samples were successively extracted using an anion-exchange resin (resin-P), 0.5 M NaHCO3 (NaHCO3-Pi and NaHCO3-Po), 0.1 M NaOH (NaOH-Pi and NaOH-Po), 0.1 M NaOH with sonication (NaOHs-Pi and NaOHs-Po), and 1 M HCl (HCl-Pi). The residual soils were then digested with 4 mL of H2SO4 and 1 mL of HClO4 (residual-P). The concentration of P was measured using a spectrophotometer. The P was further classified as labile P (resin-P, NaHCO3-Pi, and NaHCO3-Po), moderately labile P (NaOH-Pi and NaOH-Po), and stable P (NaOHs-Pi, NaOHs-Po, HCl-P, and residual-P) based on its availability to plants and microbes (Rodrigues et al., 2016). The salinity of the water was measured in situ using a salinometer (Oakton Instruments, Springfield, USA). Soil electric conductivity (EC) and pH were determined using a 2265FS EC meter (Spectrum Technologies Inc., Aurora, USA) and a pH meter (IQ Scientific Instruments, Carlsbad, USA), respectively. Soil moisture was evaluated by determining the amount of water lost at 105°C. Soil organic C (SOC) was analyzed using the dichromate oxidation method. Soil concentrations of total C (TC) and N (TN) were measured using an elemental analyzer (Elementar, Frankfurt, Germany). Soil concentrations of ammonium-N (NH4+-N) and nitrate-N (NO3−-N) were determined using flow-injection analysis (Skalar Analytical SAN++, Lachat, Netherland) and extraction with 2 M KCl. The soil texture was determined using a Mastersizer 2000 particle-size analyzer (Malvern Panalytical Ltd., Melvin, UK). Plant biomasses were measured by drying samples to constant weight at 70°C. Soil microbial DNA was extracted using an OMEGA DNA Kit following the manufacturer’s instructions. The quality and quantity of the extracted DNA were determined using a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, USA) and agarose gel electrophoresis, respectively. The extracted microbial DNA was processed, and metagenomic shotgun sequencing libraries were constructed with insert sizes of 400 bp using an Illumina TruSeq Nano DNA LT Library Preparation Kit. Each library was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq X-ten platform (Illumina, San Diego, USA) using the PE150 strategy at Personal Biotechnology Co., Ltd. (Shanghai, China). Please refer to the Supporting Information for more detailed descriptions (Appendix I). We obtained a total of 931 million qualified sequences from 12 metagenomes, ranging from 69 million to 88 million sequences per sample for downstream analyses (Table S1). [Usage Notes] The dataset can be opened using regular Office software., Accelerated sea-level rise is expected to cause the salinization of freshwater wetlands, but the responses to salinity of the availability of soil phosphorus (P) and of microbial genes involved in the cycling and transformation of P remain unexplored. Our results suggest that the P-cycling microbial community abundance and P availability respond positively to moderate increases in salinity by promoting the microbial solubilization and mineralization of soil P in brackish wetlands. Changes in microbial communities and microbially mediated P cycling may represent microbial strategies to adapt to moderate salinity levels, which in turn control soil function and nutrient balance., National Natural Science Foundation of China. Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province. Fundación Ramón Areces Project. Spanish Government. Catalan Government., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283352
Dataset. 2022

DATA FROM: FERTILISER APPLICATION MODULATES THE IMPACT OF INTERANNUAL CLIMATE FLUCTUATIONS AND PLANT-TO-PLANT INTERACTIONS ON THE DYNAMICS OF ANNUAL SPECIES IN A MEDITERRANEAN GRASSLAND

  • Valerio, Mercedes
  • Gazol Burgos, Antonio
  • Ripollés, María
  • Ibáñez, Ricardo
[Background] Climate and land-use changes, which include the application of various types of organic and inorganic fertilisers, have been reducing the species diversity of Mediterranean grasslands and threatening their conservation. Annual plants are one of the most diverse functional groups of species in these grasslands, despite suffering competitive pressure from perennial herbaceous and woody species, and they are essential for ecosystem functioning and stability., [Aims] To quantify how fertilisation modulates the impact of plant-to-plant interactions and climate fluctuations on the dynamics of annuals in Mediterranean grasslands. We hypothesised that the application of sewage sludge would increase competition between functional groups, reducing the abundance of annuals in the long-term, but would buffer the negative impacts of drought on the year-to-year fluctuation of the diversity of annuals., [Methods] In a semi-natural species-rich Mediterranean grassland in northern Spain, we analysed the changes in the taxonomical and functional composition and diversity of annuals over 14 years in response to variations in the abundance of perennial herbaceous and woody species, climate fluctuations, and fertilisation with sewage sludge. We quantified separately the patterns of year-to-year fluctuations and long-term trends., [Results] The frequency and diversity of annuals decreased with a higher abundance of perennial herbaceous species, drought in June, and cold winters. The addition of sewage sludge decreased the abundance of annuals in the long-term, seemed to promote competition between annuals and other functional groups at an interannual scale, and mitigated the negative effects of drought and cold., [Conclusions] Fertilisation influences differently the temporal response of annuals to climate fluctuations and plant-to-plant interactions., Fundación Caja Navarra, Award: ref. 10833 (Programa Tú Eliges, Tú Decides). Universidad de Navarra, Award: Project Biodiversity Data Analytics and Environmental Quality. Universidad de Navarra, Award: ROBIN (Red de Observatorios de la Biodiversidad de Navarra). Asociación de Amigos de la Universidad de Navarra, Award: Convocatoria de Ayudas para la Formación del Personal Investigador. Departamento de Educación, Gobierno de Navarra, Award: Ayudas predoctorales para la realización de programas de doctorado de interés para Navarra. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: RyC2020-030647-I. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Award: PIE-20223AT003., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283367
Dataset. 2022

DIVERGENT GROWTH-DIFFERENTIATION BALANCE STRATEGIES AND RESOURCE COMPETITION SHAPE MORTALITY PATTERNS IN PONDEROSA PINE

  • Ferrenberg, Scott
  • Vázquez-González, Carla
  • Lee, Steven
  • Kristupaitis, Milda
[Methods] See the associated manuscript for complete details. This data set contains measures of the size (diameter and height), competition neighborhood density, and measures of annual tree ring widths and resin duct traits for Ponderosa pines of southern New Mexico, USA. This data was collected using a paired design; tree pairs were selected for close proximity and similar size with one member of each pair being alive at the time of sampling and the other having been killed by bark beetles prior to the study. Annual climate data was retrieved from PRISM. [Usage Notes] The data are .csv format; metadata and details are in .txt files. No proprietary software is required to open and view the files., Dynamic resource availability leads to trade-offs among functions in plants. The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) predicts greater allocation of carbon to defense than growth when resources are scarce; with optimum defense production occurring at a point between the minimum and maximum growth rates. While the GDBH has been widely tested, consideration of phenotypic variation in rates for which defense is traded for growth and what this variation means for plant resistance remains rare. For defense, pines produce and store oleoresin in “resin ducts.” Retrospective comparisons of resin ducts in pines have revealed that trees with greater numbers, sizes, or areas of xylem resin ducts are more likely to avoid or survive insect attacks. We used tree ring chronologies to quantify phenotypic variation in growth and resin duct defenses in pairs of living and bark beetle-killed Pinus ponderosa trees in southern New Mexico, USA, and to test the utility of the GDBH for explaining tree mortality. We also assessed the sensitivity of annual growth to climate and competitor density in years preceding mortality in each pair. Survivors had greater growth rates and total cross-sectional areas of resin ducts than trees killed by bark beetles. We did not observe a difference in climate-growth relationships among the groups, however, trees killed by bark beetles suffered negative effects of competition while survivors did not. Growth-defense trade-offs conformed to the GDBH’s prediction of a quadratic relationship, however, the two groups significantly differed in the rate at which defense was traded for increasing levels of annual growth. Our results demonstrate that phenotypic variation in the trade-off between growth and defense could be used to characterize trees that were killed by or survived recent natural enemy epidemics. We hypothesize that the GDBH could be integrated with the characterization of phenotypic variation in growth-differentiation strategies—along with parsing of gene versus environment influences on phenotypes—at both local and landscape scales to increase our understanding of patterns of natural enemy impacts in plant populations., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283374
Dataset. 2019

DATA FROM: GLOBTHERM, A GLOBAL DATABASE ON THERMAL TOLERANCES FOR AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ORGANISMS

  • Bennett, Joanne M.
  • Calosi, Piero
  • Clusella-Trullas, Susana
  • Martínez, Brezo
  • Sunday, Jennifer
  • Algar, Adam C.
  • Araújo, Miguel B.
  • Hawkins, Bradford A.
  • Keith, Sally
  • Kühn, Ingolf
  • Rahbek, Carsten
  • Rodríguez, Laura
  • Singer, Alexander
  • Villalobos, Fabricio
  • Olalla-Tárraga, Miguel Ángel
  • Morales-Castilla, Ignacio
[Usage Notes] GlobTherm, a global database on thermal tolerances for aquatic and terrestrial organisms, Excel format This database includes thermal tolerance metrics for 2,133 species of multicellular algae, plants, fungi, and animals in 43 classes, 203 orders and 525 families from both aquatic, and terrestrial realms, extracted from published studies. Abbreviated citations are included in the 'REF_min' and 'REF_max' variable in the data file. For full citations, please see the attached workbook, "References_1_09_2017.xlsx". The data are available in both Excel and CSV formats in the Dryad Digital Repository (doi:10.5061/dryad.1cv08). Updates to the data and metadata will be curated through the iDiv data portal (https://idata.idiv.de/). For example, in the future we plan to include interspecific variation in the dataset, to provide multiple estimates of thermal tolerance limits for a given species where estimates determined using the best possible methods will be more highly ranked. GlobalTherm_upload_10_11_17.xlsx References_1_09_2017.xlsx GlobTherm, a global database on thermal tolerances for aquatic and terrestrial organisms, CSV format This database includes thermal tolerance metrics for 2,133 species of multicellular algae, plants, fungi, and animals in 43 classes, 203 orders and 525 families from both aquatic, and terrestrial realms, extracted from published studies. Abbreviated citations are included in the 'REF_min' and 'REF_max' variable in the data file. For full citations, please see the attached workbook, "References_1_09_2017.xlsx". The data are available in both Excel and CSV formats in the Dryad Digital Repository (doi:10.5061/dryad.1cv08). Updates to the data and metadata will be curated through the iDiv data portal (https://idata.idiv.de/). For example, in the future we plan to include interspecific variation in the dataset, to provide multiple estimates of thermal tolerance limits for a given species where estimates determined using the best possible methods will be more highly ranked. GlobalTherm_upload_02_11_17.csv References_1_09_2017.xlsx, How climate affects species distributions is a longstanding question receiving renewed interest owing to the need to predict the impacts of global warming on biodiversity. Is climate change forcing species to live near their critical thermal limits? Are these limits likely to change through natural selection? These and other important questions can be addressed with models relating geographical distributions of species with climate data, but inferences made with these models are highly contingent on non-climatic factors such as biotic interactions. Improved understanding of climate change effects on species will require extensive analysis of thermal physiological traits, but such data are scarce and scattered. To overcome current limitations, we created the GlobTherm database. The database contains experimentally derived species’ thermal tolerance data currently comprising over 2,000 species of terrestrial, freshwater, intertidal and marine multicellular algae, pl ants, fungi, and animals. The GlobTherm database will be maintained and curated by iDiv with the aim of expanding it, and enable further investigations on the effects of climate on the distribution of life on Earth., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283380
Dataset. 2019

DATA FROM: TRADE-OFFS AND SYNERGIES BETWEEN BIRD CONSERVATION AND WILDFIRE SUPPRESSION IN THE FACE OF GLOBAL CHANGE

  • Regos, Adrián
  • Hermoso, Virgilio
  • D'Amen, Manuela
  • Guisan, Antoine
  • Brotons, Lluís
[Usage Notes] Data files from Regos et al. (2018) These data files include the environmental suitability predicted from the SESAM framework for each bird species, under each run simulation and management scenario. It also includes the Natura 2000 network at 100 m and all remaining files required to run MARXAN simulations. Datafiles.zip, 1. The combined effects of climate change and other factors, such as land use change or fire disturbance, pose daunting challenges for biodiversity conservation worldwide. 2. In this study, we predicted the future effectiveness of the Natura 2000 (N2000), the current network of protected areas (PA) in Europe, at maintaining and representing suitable environmental conditions for a set of 79 bird species between 2000 and 2050 in a fire-prone area strongly affected by land abandonment processes in NE Spain. We then compared PA performance against a set of alternative priority areas for conservation, which take into account fire–vegetation dynamics, selected by using a conservation planning tool (MARXAN). Fire–vegetation dynamics were modelled using a process-based model (MEDFIRE MODEL) under alternative fire management and climate change scenarios. Bird assemblage distributions were predicted using the spatially-explicit species assemblage modelling frameworkSESAMusing distribution models from individual species that hierarchically integrate climate change and wildfire–vegetation dynamics. 3. The amount of suitable environmental conditions within the N2000 network was predicted to fall by around 15%, on average, over the next decades in relation to the initial conditions, but could be partially modulated by fire management policies in the near future. The efficiency of the current PA system was predicted to decrease from 17.4 to 15% over the next decades. However, a more efficient PA system could be achieved with a conservation planning approach that explicitly considers fire–vegetation dynamics and their management. 4. Synthesis and applications: Our findings shed light on: (1) how the current Natura 2000 might still hold an important bird conservation value by 2050; (2) how the relocation of some protected areas could be considered along the next decades to substantially increase bird conservation effectiveness; and (3) how the integration of fire-vegetation dynamics, fire management policies and their objectives within conservation planning can provide ‘win-win’ solutions for bird conservation and fire prevention in fire-prone abandoned landscapes., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283385
Dataset. 2019

DATA FROM: THE BALANCE OF CANOPY AND SOIL EFFECTS DETERMINES INTRASPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN FOUNDATION SPECIES’ EFFECTS ON ASSOCIATED PLANTS

  • Pistón Caballero, Nuria
  • Michalet, Richard
  • Schöb, Christian
  • Macek, Petr
  • Armas, Cristina
  • Pugnaire, Francisco I.
[Usage Notes] Piston_et_al_2018_Data.zip All data used to assess whether two contrasted canopy phenotypes (tight and loose) of the shrub Cytisus galianoi differed in their effects on the microhabitat and on subordinate plant community composition in a dry subalpine system. We also experimentally distinguished the relative contribution of above- (canopy) and below-ground (soil) effects of C. galianoi on the most frequent subordinate species, Festuca indigesta, as well as the reciprocal effects of F. indigesta on C. galianoi. Pistón_et_al_2018_Data.zip, 1. The impact of plant-plant interactions on species diversity patterns has been broadly addressed in stressful environments, such as alpine ecosystems, where foundation species promote species richness by creating habitat for other species. However, foundation species with contrasting phenotypes might modify the microhabitat differently, which would alter the subordinate community composition, and coincide with distinct feedback effects of those subordinate species on the foundation species. However, the precise interaction mechanisms that facilitate species are not fully understood, especially the relative contribution of above- and below-ground compartments of foundation species to subordinate species and the potential feedbacks they receive. 2. We explored whether two contrasted canopy phenotypes (tight and loose) of the shrub Cytisus galianoi differed in their effects on the microhabitat and on subordinate plant community composition in a dry subalpine system. We also experimentally distinguished the relative contribution of above- (canopy) and below-ground (soil) effects of C. galianoi on the most frequent subordinate species, Festuca indigesta, as well as the reciprocal effects of F. indigesta on C. galianoi. 3. We performed observational and manipulative experiments to assess the influence of phenotypic differences of the shrub on understory microhabitat and subordinate plant community composition. Reciprocal effects were assessed by removing either F. indigesta from the understory of the two shrub phenotypes or the C. galianoi canopy from the immediate vicinity of F. indigesta. 4. The two C. galianoi phenotypes differed in mean values of functional traits (like stem density or plant height), modified their understory microhabitats differently, and hosted distinct subordinate communities. Loose phenotypes had more positive effects on community composition and diversity than tight phenotypes. Additionally, tight phenotypes simultaneously showed both more positive aboveground and more negative belowground effects on F. indigesta than loose phenotypes. There were no significant feedback effects of F. indigesta on C. galianoi. 5. The two phenotypes of the foundation species C. galianoi showed contrasting effects on the subordinate plant community: compared to the tight phenotype, the loose phenotype had higher associated species diversity and reduced reciprocal interaction intensities above- and below-ground with the subordinate species F. indigesta. This highlights the impact of phenotypic variation for plant interactions and community-level diversity., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283424
Dataset. 2022

CATÁLOGO DE LOS SPHINGONOTUS FIEBER, 1852 (ORTHOPTERA: ACRIDIDAE: OEDIPODINAE) DE LA PENÍNSULA IBÉRICA CONSERVADOS EN LA COLECCIÓN DE ENTOMOLOGÍA DEL MUSEO NACIONAL DE CIENCIAS NATURALES (MNCN, CSIC) [DATASET]

  • Llorente-Cortés, Vicenta
  • París, Mercedes
  • Sánchez Ruiz, Manuel
Se presentan los datos del catálogo de los ejemplares ibéricos del género Sphingonotus Fieber, 1852 (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Oedipodinae) conservados en la Colección de Entomología del Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales de Madrid (MNCN-CSIC). En esta colección se conservan desde los ejemplares más antiguos examinados y publicados por los pioneros en la ortopterología ibérica, hasta los más recientes que han servido para aportar interesantes novedades al conocimiento del género. Todos los ejemplares han sido revisados e identificados de acuerdo al conocimiento actual de este complicado grupo., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283424, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14796
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283424
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283424, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14796
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283424
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283424, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14796
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283424
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283424, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14796
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283424

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283447
Dataset. 2022

DETERMINATION OF OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF LIGAND-FREE ORGANIC LEAD HALIDE PEROVSKITE QUANTUM DOTS

  • Rubino, Andrea
  • Lozano, Gabriel
  • Calvo, Mauricio E.
  • Míguez, Hernán
Precise knowledge of the optical constants of perovskite lead halide quantum dots (QDs) is required to both understand their interaction with light and to rationally design and optimize the devices based on them. However, their determination from colloidal nanocrystal suspensions, or films made out of them, remains elusive, as a result of the difficulty to disentangle the optical constants of the organic capping and those of the semiconductor itself. In this work, we extract the refractive index and extinction coefficient of ligand-free methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) and bromide (MAPbBr3) nanocrystals. In order to prevent the use of organic ligands in the preparation, we follow a scaffold assisted synthetic procedure, which yields a composite film of high optical quality that can be independently and precisely characterized and modelled. In this way, the contribution of the guest nanocrystals can be successfully discriminated from that of the host matrix. Using a Kramers-Kronig consistent dispersion model along with an effective medium approximation it is possible to derive the optical constants of the QDs by fitting the spectral dependence of light transmitted and reflected at different angles and polarizations. Our results indicate a strong dependence of the optical constants with the QD size. Small nanocrystals show remarkably large values of the extinction coefficient compared to their bulk counterparts. This analysis opens the door to the rigorous modelling of solar cells and light-emitting diodes with active layers based on perovskite QDs., Financial support of the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation under grant PID2020-116593RB-I00, funded by MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033, and of the Junta de Andalucía under grant P18-RT-2291 (FEDER/UE) is gratefully acknowledged., Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283447, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14799
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283447
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283447, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14799
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283447
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283447, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14799
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283447
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283447, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14799
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283447

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283533
Dataset. 2019

DATA FROM: QUANTIFYING TEMPORAL CHANGE IN PLANT POPULATION ATTRIBUTES: INSIGHTS FROM A RESURRECTION APPROACH

  • Gómez, Rocío
  • Méndez-Vigo, Belén
  • Marcer, Arnald
  • Alonso-Blanco, Carlos
  • Picó, F. Xavier
[Usage Notes] Arabidopsis_resurrection_13sep18. Flowering time data, microsatellite data and weather data from Iberian Arabidopsis thaliana accessions included in the resurrection experiments., Rapid evolution in annual plants can be quantified by comparing phenotypic and genetic changes between past and contemporary individuals from the same populations over several generations. Such knowledge will help understand the response of plants to rapid environmental shifts, such as the ones imposed by global climate change. To that end, we undertook a resurrection approach in Spanish populations of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana that were sampled twice over a decade. Annual weather records were compared to their historical records to extract patterns of climatic shifts over time. We evaluated the differences between samplings in flowering time, a key life-history trait with adaptive significance, with a field experiment. We also estimated genetic diversity and differentiation based on neutral nuclear markers and nucleotide diversity in candidate flowering time (FRI and FLC) and seed dormancy (DOG1) genes. The role of genetic drift was estimated by computing effective population sizes with the temporal method. Overall, two climatic scenarios were detected: intense warming with increased precipitation and moderate warming with decreased precipitation. The average flowering time varied little between samplings. Instead, within-population variation in flowering time exhibited a decreasing trend over time. Substantial temporal changes in genetic diversity and differentiation were observed with both nuclear microsatellites and candidate genes in all populations, which were interpreted as the result of natural demographic fluctuations. We conclude that drought stress caused by moderate warming with decreased precipitation may have the potential to reduce within-population variation in key life-cycle traits, perhaps as a result of stabilising selection on them, and to constrain the genetic differentiation over time. Besides, the demographic behaviour of populations probably accounts for the substantial temporal patterns of genetic variation, while keeping rather constant those of phenotypic variation., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283539
Dataset. 2019

DATA FROM: HEAT TOLERANCE IS MORE VARIABLE THAN COLD TOLERANCE ACROSS SPECIES OF IBERIAN LIZARDS AFTER CONTROLLING FOR INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION

  • Herrando-Pérez, Salvador
  • Monasterio, Camila
  • Beukema, Wouter
  • Gomes, Verónica
  • Ferri-Yáñez, Francisco
  • Belliure, Josabel
  • Chown, Steven L.
  • Buckley, Lauren B.
  • Vieites, David R.
  • Araújo, Miguel B.
[Methods] Author contributions: Monasterio, Beukema and Gómes lead field (lizard sampling) and lab (estimation of thermal limits and measurement of body weights) work, and Monasterio and Araújo designed experiments. Herrando-Pérez conceived the idea of the two research manuscripts (Functional Ecology, Journal of Animal Ecology) and submitted the data to Dryad. Funding: MBA partly funded through CGL2011-26852 project of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. Field and experimental work funded by IC&DT 1/SAESCTN/ALENT-07-0224-FEDER-001755 project led by MBA. Acknowledgements: We thank the Biological Station of “El Ventorrillo” for hosting the field team and for providing the thermal experimental facilities essential for this research. We also thank Tim Leerschool, Filipe Serrano and Matthijs Hollanders for their support in the field. Collection permits: Samples, experiments and use of experimental animals supported for Portuguese populations by permits 360 to 362/2014/CAPT and 550 to 552/2014/CAPT (Instituto da Conservação da Natureza e das Florestas), and for Spanish populations by permits (autonomous communities in parenthesis hereafter) SGYB/EF/FJRH Re-9H/13 & SGYB/AF/DBP Re-79y131/14 (Andalucía), 2014-500201724/2014/02343 & INAGA/5000201/24/2013/04434 (Aragón), DGMEN/SEN/avp_13_025_aut & DGMEN/SEN/avp_14_020_aut (Castilla La Mancha), P/CYL/101/2013 & EP/CYL/106/2014 (Castilla y León), CN0023/14/ACA1587(14) (Extremadura), 2566/RX131316//clave031/2013 & 2241/RX123724//clave018/2014 (Galicia), and 10/033298.9/13 & 10/013907.9/14 (Madrid). [Usage Notes] Content of dataset: Critical Thermal Maxima (CTmax) and Critical Thermal Minima (CTmax) and body weights of 304 male individuals belonging to 59 populations and 15 species of Iberian lizards (Dryad doi: 10.5061/dryad.1553pc3). Body weight, CTmax and CTmin available for all populations except the Moncayo/Soria/Spain population of Podarcis muralis for which CTmin was not measured. Dataset set used in two research manuscripts: Intraspecific variation in lizard heat tolerance alters estimates of climate impact / Journal of Animal Ecology (doi: 10.1111/1365-2656.12914) and Heat tolerance is more variable than cold tolerance across species of Iberian lizards after controlling for intraspecific variation / Functional Ecology (in press). Versions of dataset: the first version of the dataset contained CTmax data alone (Journal of Animal Ecology), species names, population codes, locality names (with region, country, lat/long), the second version of the dataset (Functional Ecology) contains the latter information along with CTmin and body-weight data while the locality names and lat/long have been refined., The widespread observation that heat tolerance is less variable than cold tolerance (‘cold-tolerance asymmetry’) leads to the prediction that species exposed to temperatures near their thermal maxima should have reduced evolutionary potential for adapting to climate warming. However, the prediction is largely supported by species-level global studies based on single estimates of both physiological metrics per taxon. We ask if cold-tolerance asymmetry holds for Iberian lizards after accounting for intraspecific variation in critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and minima (CTmin). To do so, we quantified CTmax and CTmin for 58 populations of 15 Iberian lizard species (299 individuals). Then, we randomly selected one population from each study species (population sample = 15 CTmax and CTmin values), tested for variance homoscedasticity across species, and repeated the test for thousands of population samples as if we had undertaken the same study thousands of times, each time sampling one different population per species. The ratio of variances in CTmax to CTmin across species varied up to 16-fold depending on the populations chosen. Variance ratios show how much CTmax departs from the cross-species mean compared to CTmin, with a unitary ratio indicating equal variance of both thermal limits. Sampling one population per species was six times more likely to result in the observation of greater CTmax variance (‘heat-tolerance asymmetry’) than cold-tolerance asymmetry. The null hypothesis of equal variance was twice as likely for cases of cold-tolerance asymmetry than for the opposite scenario. Range-wide, population-level studies that quantify heat and cold tolerance of individual species are urgently needed to ascertain the global prevalence of cold-tolerance asymmetry. While broad latitudinal clines of cold tolerance have been strongly supported, heat tolerance might respond to smaller-scale climatic and habitat factors hence go unnoticed in global studies. Studies investigating physiological responses to climate change should incorporate the extent to which thermal traits are characteristic of individuals, populations and/or species., British Ecological Society, Award: 4496-5470. European Union, Award: IC&DT 1/SAESCTN/ALENT-07-0224-FEDER-001755. Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Award: CGL2011-26852., Peer reviewed


Buscador avanzado