Dataset.

Decoration increases the conspicuousness of raptor nests [Dataset]

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/133007
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Canal, David
  • Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita
  • Sergio, Fabrizio
  • Negro, Juan J.
The dataset contains the results of the trials of nest detectability using 25 volunteers as "experimental conspecifics” to estimate the detectability of black kite nests to trespassers. The dataset include the ID of Volunteers; Id of the images; ID of the nest; Distance to the nest (measured in AGL and meters); Position of the UAV when taking the image (zenithal, lateral or approaching snapshots); Decoration of the nests (Decorated (1) vs. non-decorated (0)); Detection of the nest by the volunteer (Detected (1) vs. non-detected (0)); Time to detection (seconds); Detection_pair (coded as 1, if the images from the same position and both treatments were detected in a nest, or 0, in the opposite case) and nest dimensions: lenght, width and opening angles, defined as the three angles of unobstructed view of the sky (see main text for further details), In this study, we used UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) technology to simulate the aerial perspective of trespassing, flying black kites, and assess whether decorated nests were more conspicuous than undecorated ones to a human observer. To this end, we flew at pre-determined distances from actual nests built by black kites a UAS, equipped with a digital high-resolution camera, and gathered images of the nests with and without an experimentally placed decoration. The images were later standardized using ad hoc prepared software and shown to volunteers through a standardized routine to determine whether detection rate varied according to nest decoration status and distance, Peer reviewed
 
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/133007
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/133007

HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/133007
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/133007
 
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/133007
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/133007

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/140269
Artículo científico (article). 2016

DECORATION INCREASES THE CONSPICUOUSNESS OF RAPTOR NESTS

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Canal, David
  • Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita
  • Negro, Juan J.
  • Sergio, Fabrizio
Avian nests are frequently concealed or camouflaged, but a number of species builds noticeable nests or use conspicuous materials for nest decoration. In most cases, nest decoration has a role in mate choice or provides thermoregulatory or antiparasitic benefits. In territorial species however, decorations may serve additional or complementary functions, such as extended phenotypic signaling of nest-site occupancy and social status to potential intruders. The latter may benefit both signaler and receiver by minimizing the risk of aggressive interactions, especially in organisms with dangerous weaponry. Support for this hypothesis was recently found in a population of black kites (Milvus migrans), a territorial raptor that decorates its nest with white artificial materials. However, the crucial assumption that nest decorations increased nest-site visibility to conspecifics was not assessed, a key aspect given that black kite nests may be well concealed within the canopy. Here, we used an unmanned aircraft system to take pictures of black kite nests, with and without an experimentally placed decoration, from different altitudes and distances simulating the perspective of a flying and approaching, prospecting intruder. The pictures were shown to human volunteers through a standardized routine to determine whether detection rates varied according the nest decoration status and distance. Decorated nests consistently showed a higher detection frequency and a lower detection-latency, compared to undecorated versions of the same nests. Our results confirm that nest decoration in this species may act as a signaling medium that enhances nest visibility for aerial receivers, even at large distances. This finding complements previous work on this communication system, which showed that nest decoration was a threat informing trespassing conspecifics on the social dominance, territory quality and fighting capabilities of the signaler., Peer reviewed, Peer Reviewed




Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/133007
Dataset. 2016

DECORATION INCREASES THE CONSPICUOUSNESS OF RAPTOR NESTS [DATASET]

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Canal, David
  • Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita
  • Sergio, Fabrizio
  • Negro, Juan J.
The dataset contains the results of the trials of nest detectability using 25 volunteers as "experimental conspecifics” to estimate the detectability of black kite nests to trespassers. The dataset include the ID of Volunteers; Id of the images; ID of the nest; Distance to the nest (measured in AGL and meters); Position of the UAV when taking the image (zenithal, lateral or approaching snapshots); Decoration of the nests (Decorated (1) vs. non-decorated (0)); Detection of the nest by the volunteer (Detected (1) vs. non-detected (0)); Time to detection (seconds); Detection_pair (coded as 1, if the images from the same position and both treatments were detected in a nest, or 0, in the opposite case) and nest dimensions: lenght, width and opening angles, defined as the three angles of unobstructed view of the sky (see main text for further details), In this study, we used UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) technology to simulate the aerial perspective of trespassing, flying black kites, and assess whether decorated nests were more conspicuous than undecorated ones to a human observer. To this end, we flew at pre-determined distances from actual nests built by black kites a UAS, equipped with a digital high-resolution camera, and gathered images of the nests with and without an experimentally placed decoration. The images were later standardized using ad hoc prepared software and shown to volunteers through a standardized routine to determine whether detection rate varied according to nest decoration status and distance, Peer reviewed




1106