Dataset.

Drivers of population differentiation in phenotypic plasticity in a temperate conifer: a 27-year study [Dataset]

Drivers of phenotypic plasticity in a forest tree [Dataset]

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Mata Pombo, Raúl de la
[EN] These project improve our understanding of the microevolutionary drivers of phenotypic plasticity, a critical process for resilience of long-lived species under climate change, and support decision making in tree genetic improvement programs and seed transfer strategies. The dataset compiles the three common garden tests (Condon, Lubrecht and Little Wolf) established in western Montana (USA) followed a Population × Family structure. Seeds were collected from 115 open-pollinated, unrelated wild mother trees in the 23 populations. Every population was represented by 5 open-pollinated families and every family was planted in all three trials. One-year-old bare-root seedlings were planted in 1974 on a 3 × 3 m spacing using a randomized complete block design at the family level with 4-tree-row plots and 5 blocks in each site. Tree growth was measured as tree height at ages 2, 4, 5, 11, 16, 21 and 27, and diameter at breast height (DBH; 1.4 m above ground) at ages 5, 11, 16, 21 and 27. DBH at age 27 was chosen as the best predictor of genetic growth potential in these trials. Means and standard errors of DBH27 were compueted at the family level within each site., The Barrié Foundation provided postdoctoral support to Raúl de Mata (EDB-CSIC). The Inland Empire Tree Improvement Cooperative (Montana, USA) collected the data and Raúl de Mata (EDB-CSIC) processed the data. This project was partially funded by a McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research Grant MONZ-1206 from the College of Forestry and Conservation of the University of Montana., No
 
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280295, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14756
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295

HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280295, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14756
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295
 
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280295, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14756
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/284326
Artículo científico (article). 2022

DRIVERS OF POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION IN PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN A TEMPERATE CONIFER: A 27-YEAR STUDY

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • de la Mata, Raul
  • Zas, Rafael
  • Bustingorri, Gloria
  • Sampedro, Luis
  • Rust, Marc
  • Hernandez-Serrano, Ana
  • Sala, Anna
Phenotypic plasticity is a main mechanism for organisms to cope with changing environments and broaden their ecological range. Plasticity is genetically based and can evolve under natural selection, such that populations within a species show distinct phenotypic responses to the environment if evolved under different conditions. Understanding how intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity arises is critical to assess potential adaptation to ongoing climate change. Theory predicts that plasticity is favored in more favorable but variable environments. Yet, many theoretical predictions about benefits, costs, and selection on plasticity remain untested. To test these predictions, we took advantage of three genetic trials in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA, which assessed 23 closely located Pinus ponderosa populations over 27 years. Mean environmental conditions and their spatial patterns of variation at the seed source populations were characterized based on six basic climate parameters. Despite the small area of origin, there was significant genetic variation in phenotypic plasticity for tree growth among populations. We found a significant negative correlation between phenotypic plasticity and the patch size of environmental heterogeneity at the seed source populations, but not with total environmental spatial variance. These results show that populations exposed to high microhabitat heterogeneity have evolved higher phenotypic plasticity and that the trigger was the grain rather than the total magnitude of spatial heterogeneity. Contrary to theoretical predictions, we also found a positive relationship between population plasticity and summer drought at the seed source, indicating that drought can act as a trigger of plasticity. Finally, we found a negative correlation between the quantitative genetic variance within populations and their phenotypic plasticity, suggesting compensatory adaptive mechanisms for the lack of genetic diversity. These results improve our understanding of the microevolutionary drivers of phenotypic plasticity, a critical process for resilience of long-lived species under climate change, and support decision-making in tree genetic improvement programs and seed transfer strategies., This project was partially funded by a McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research Grant MONZ-1206 from the College of Forestry and Conservation of the University of Montana to A.S. R.Z. and L.S. were supported by the RESILPINE grant funded by the Spanish Government (RTI2018-094691-B-C33, MCIU/AEI/FEDER-UE) and a GAIN grant funded by the regional Government of Galicia (IN607/2021/583535)., Peer reviewed




Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280295
Dataset. 2022

DRIVERS OF POPULATION DIFFERENTIATION IN PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN A TEMPERATE CONIFER: A 27-YEAR STUDY [DATASET], DRIVERS OF PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN A FOREST TREE [DATASET]

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Mata Pombo, Raúl de la
[EN] These project improve our understanding of the microevolutionary drivers of phenotypic plasticity, a critical process for resilience of long-lived species under climate change, and support decision making in tree genetic improvement programs and seed transfer strategies. The dataset compiles the three common garden tests (Condon, Lubrecht and Little Wolf) established in western Montana (USA) followed a Population × Family structure. Seeds were collected from 115 open-pollinated, unrelated wild mother trees in the 23 populations. Every population was represented by 5 open-pollinated families and every family was planted in all three trials. One-year-old bare-root seedlings were planted in 1974 on a 3 × 3 m spacing using a randomized complete block design at the family level with 4-tree-row plots and 5 blocks in each site. Tree growth was measured as tree height at ages 2, 4, 5, 11, 16, 21 and 27, and diameter at breast height (DBH; 1.4 m above ground) at ages 5, 11, 16, 21 and 27. DBH at age 27 was chosen as the best predictor of genetic growth potential in these trials. Means and standard errors of DBH27 were compueted at the family level within each site., The Barrié Foundation provided postdoctoral support to Raúl de Mata (EDB-CSIC). The Inland Empire Tree Improvement Cooperative (Montana, USA) collected the data and Raúl de Mata (EDB-CSIC) processed the data. This project was partially funded by a McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research Grant MONZ-1206 from the College of Forestry and Conservation of the University of Montana., No





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