Resultados totales (Incluyendo duplicados): 34416
Encontrada(s) 3442 página(s)
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/282936
Dataset. 2022

TEMPNORTHBRYO - MOSSES OCCURRENCES DATASET FROM THE TEMPERATE REGION OF THE NORTH HEMISPHERE

  • Ronquillo, Cristina
  • Stropp, Juliana
  • Hortal, Joaquín
[EN] Dataset of publicly available biodiversity information of mosses records from the temperate region of the Northern Hemisphere. It contains 9,195,062 occurrences result of the compilation, cleaning, enrichment and validation from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF 2021; phylum=Bryophyta), the Botanical Information and Ecology Network (BIEN), Consortium of North American Bryophyte Herbaria (CNABH) and the Integrated digitized biocollections (iDigBio). This database was created to assess and quantify how the application of different filters and taxonomic standardization databases affect the spatial patterns of species richness (Ronquillo et al, not published)., [ES] Conjunto de datos con los 9,195,062 registros disponibles públicamente de presencias de musgos en la región templada del hemisferio norte. Los datos contenidos han sido compilados, limpiados y validados a partir de los registros presentes en el portal de datos de biodiversidad 'Global Biodiversity Information Facility' (GBIF 2021; filo=Bryophyta), 'Botanical Information and Ecology Network' (BIEN), 'Consortium of North American Bryophyte Herbaria' (CNABH) y el portal 'Integrated digitized biocollections' (iDigBio). Esta base de datos fue creada con el objetivo de analizar si la aplicación de diferentes filtros de limpieza de datos y métodos de estandarización taxonómica afectan a la distribución geográfica de la riqueza de especies (Ronquillo et al, no publicado)., This work is part of the project SCENIC - Escalando los efectos de las dinámicas de nicho e interacciones en las consecuencias ecológicas y evolutivas de la coexistencia / Scaling the effects of niche and interaction dynamics on the ecological and evolutionary outcomes of coexistence [PID2019-106840GB-C21] (Proyecto coordinado) Project SCENIC, grant PID2019-106840GB-C21 funded by MCIN/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033, No

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/282936, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14794
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/282936
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/282936, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14794
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/282936
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/282936, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14794
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/282936
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/282936, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14794
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/282936

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283990
Dataset. 2022

UNITEDSIXSOILMOSS - SIX COSMOPOLITE MEDITERRANEAN SOIL MOSS SPECIES GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION DATASET

  • Ronquillo, Cristina
  • Molina-Bustamante, Manuel
  • Medina, Nagore G.
  • Hortal, Joaquín
Dataset of publicly available biodiversity information of mosses records of six different species. The selected species are Tortella squarrosa (Brid.) Limpr., Dicranum scoparium Hedw., Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) F.Weber & D.Mohr, Ptychostomum capillare (Hedw.) D.T.Holyoak & N.Pedersen, Homalothecium aureum (Spruce) H.Rob. and Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw. The dataset contains 322,595 occurrences result of the compilation, cleaning, enrichment and validation from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (see 'is.based.on' field to check download citations from GBIF). This database was elaborated to develope species distribution models and make predictions of their future geographical distribution based on different climate change scenarios., This work was part of the project UNITED Unifying niches, interactions and distributions: A common theoretical framework for geographic range dynamics and local coexistence (CGL2016-78070-P, funded by AEI/FEDER, UE) and SCENIC - Escalando los efectos de las dinámicas de nicho e interacciones en las consecuencias ecológicas y evolutivas de la coexistencia / Scaling the effects of niche and interaction dynamics on the ecological and evolutionary outcomes of coexistence [PID2019-106840GB-C21] (Proyecto coordinado) Project SCENIC, grant PID2019-106840GB-C21 funded by MCIN/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033, No

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283990, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14810
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283990
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283990, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14810
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283990
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283990, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14810
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283990
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283990, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14810
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283990

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283049
Dataset. 2022

EGG SIZE AUDOUIN'S GULLS 1992-2021

DATASET ON AUDOUIN'S GULL EGG SIEZE WITH INDEXES OF FOOD 1992-2021

  • Oro, Daniel
[EN] Egg size data for breeding Audouin's Gulls in the Ebro Delta during 1992-2021, with details on the age of the adults and clutch size., [ES] Datos de tamaño de huevo para la gaviota de Audouin nidificante en el Delta del Ebro durante 1992-2021, con detalles sobre la edad de los reproductores y tamaño de puesta., CIRIT (Generalitat de Catalunya, ACOM92/3051//10), ICONA, EU (LIFE projects (LIFE96/NAT/E/3118-B4-3200/96/502, LIFE NAT 2002/0502), Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología BOS2000-0569-C02-02, BOS2003-01960, CGL2006-04325/BOS, CGL2013-42203-R, CGL2017-85210-P), EU (Programme Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources, QLRT-2000-00839)., Peer reviewed

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283049, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14795
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283049
HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283049, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14795
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283049
PMID: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283049, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14795
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283049
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/283049, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14795
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283049

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283189
Dataset. 2021

WORLDWIDE BIRD ASSEMBLAGES ACROSS URBAN-WILDLAND GRADIENTS

  • Sol, Daniel
  • González-Lagos, César
  • Moreira, Dario
[Methods] We gathered presence/absence and abundance data from published studies and reports to characterize avian assemblages. The survey method varied across studies, but the same method was used for each habitat within a particular region, making data comparable using appropriate models., We gathered presence/absence and abundance data from published studies and reports for 319 well-characterized assemblages spanning 50 cities from Africa, Australia, Europe, North America and South America. We focused on cities with comparable survey data within urban habitats and in nearby natural habitat. The final dataset contains almost 10,000 records for 1507bird species, 66 of which are introduced (non-native) in at least one study region. Species abundance per unit area or unit time were available for 269 assemblages from 42 cities, comprising 1353 species. Following Newbold et al. (2015), we used published habitat descriptions to classify the intensity of human use in urban habitats for each assemblage: (1) highly urbanised environments mainly contain densely packed buildings with vegetation scarce or absent; (2) moderately urbanised environments are residential areas with single-family houses and associated gardens; and (3) little-urbanised environments have few buildings and abundant vegetation (e.g. urban parks). The habitats outside the city were assigned to either natural vegetation or rural habitat based on the description of the habitat given in the source paper. Standardised survey methods were used across habitats within each region., Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: CGL2013-47448-P. ANID-FONDECYT., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283203
Dataset. 2020

MODELING MULTIPARTITE VIRUS EVOLUTION: THE GENOME FORMULA FACILITATES RAPID ADAPTATION TO HETEROGENEOUS ENVIRONMENTS

  • Zwart, Mark P.
  • Elena, Santiago F.
[Methods] This submission contains all the R code used for numerical predictions and simulations presented in the paper. Selected simulation results are also included, to allow the reader quick access to results without having to run some of these (computationally intensive) scripts. [Usage Notes] The R code and simulation results are organized according to the figures presented in the data, to help easily find the relevant code., Multipartite viruses have two or more genome segments, and package different segments into different particle types. Although multipartition is thought to have a cost for virus transmission, its benefits are not clear. Recent experimental work has shown that the equilibrium frequency of viral genome segments, the setpoint genome formula (SGF), can be unbalanced and host-species dependent. These observations have reinvigorated the hypothesis that changes in genome-segment frequencies can lead to changes in virus-gene expression that might be adaptive. Here we explore this hypothesis by developing models of bipartite virus infection, leading to a threefold contribution. First, we show that the SGF depends on the cellular multiplicity of infection (MOI), when the requirements for infection clash with optimizing the SGF for virus-particle yield per cell. Second, we find that convergence on the SGF is very rapid, often occurring within a few cellular rounds of infection. Low and intermediate MOIs lead to faster convergence on the SGF. For low MOIs this effect occurs because of the requirements for infection, whereas for intermediate MOIs this effect is also due to the high levels of variation generated in the genome formula. Third, we explored the conditions under which a bipartite virus could outcompete a monopartite one. As the heterogeneity between environments and specificity of gene-expression requirements for each environment increased, the bipartite virus was more likely to outcompete the monopartite virus. Under some conditions changes in the genome formula helped to exclude the monopartite competitor, highlighting the versatility of the genome formula. Our results show the inextricable relationship between MOI and the SGF, and suggest that under some conditions the cost of multipartition can be outweighed by its benefits for the rapid tuning of viral gene expression., Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek, Award: 016.Vidi.171.061. Agencia Estatal de Investigación, Award: FEDER grant BFU2015-65037-P. Generalitat Valenciana, Award: PROMETEU/2019/012., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283209
Dataset. 2020

MARINE BIOMONITORING WITH EDNA: CAN METABARCODING OF WATER SAMPLES CUT IT AS A TOOL FOR SURVEYING BENTHIC COMMUNITIES?

  • Antich, Adrià
  • Palacín, Cruz
  • Cebrian, Emma
  • Wangensteen, Owen S.
  • Golo, Raül
  • Turon, Xavier
In the marine realm, biomonitoring using eDNA of benthic communities requires destructive direct sampling or the setting-up of settlement structures. Comparatively much less effort is required to sample the water column, which can be accessed remotely. In this study we assess the feasibility of obtaining information from the eukaryotic benthic communities by sampling the adjacent water layer. We studied two different rocky-substrate benthic communities with a technique based on quadrat sampling. We also took replicate water samples at distances from a few centimetres to 20 m from the benthic habitat. Using as marker a fragment of the Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene with universal primers, we obtained a total of 3,543 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs) from the samples. The structure obtained in the two environments was markedly different, with Metazoa, Archaeplastida Rhodophyta and Stramenopiles being the most diverse group in benthic samples, and HacrobiaAlveolata, Metazoa and Alveolata Rhizaria in the water. Only 265 MOTUs (7.5%) were shared between benthos and water samples, and of these 180 MOTUs (5.1%) were identified as benthic MOTUs that left their DNA in the water. Most of them were found immediately adjacent to the benthos, and their number decreased and The distribution of these benthic shared MOTUs showed a decrease both in number of MOTUs and in number of reads as we moved apart from the benthic habitat. It was concluded that water eDNA, even in the close vicinity of the benthos, was a poor proxy for the analysis of benthic structure, and that direct sampling methods are required for monitoring these complex benthic communities via metabarcoding., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283242
Dataset. 2020

DATA FROM: SPONTANEOUS FOREST REGROWTH IN SOUTH-WEST EUROPE: CONSEQUENCES FOR NATURE’S CONTRIBUTIONS TO PEOPLE

  • Martín-Forés, Irene
  • Magro, Sandra
  • Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés
  • Alfaro-Sánchez, Raquel
  • Espelta, Josep Maria
  • Frei, Theresa
  • Valdés-Correcher, Elena
  • Rodríguez Fernández-Blanco, Carmen
  • Winkel, Georg
  • Gerzabek, Gabriel
  • Hampe, Arndt
  • Valladares Ros, Fernando
[Methods] The dataset was collected by four different teams who took part in the project. It consisted on four case studies of forest regrowth (including expansion and densification) after rural abandonment with contrasting ecological and societal contexts. The study took place in Spain and France. Two landscapes are located in rural areas undergoing human exodus and forest expansion and densification; the other two, in peri-urban areas with intense land use and forest densification but negligible expansion. For each forest plot, we estimated variables related to ten out of the 18 main Nature's contributions to people (NCP) defined by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services. Regulating and material NCP were addressed using variables measured in the field as proxies. Non-material NCP were studied through stakeholder interviews. Thus, this dataset contains data on NCP associated with forest regrowth of Juniperus thurifera L., Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus ilex L., and Quercus robur L stands. It includes a total of 65 study plots and 2,837 individual trees. The considered NCP included four regulating, three material, and three non-material NCP as well as one NCP common to all categories. The four regulating NCP were habitat creation and maintenance; pollination and dispersal of seeds and other propagules; regulation of climate through biological carbon (C) sequestration and storage; and regulation of detrimental organisms and biological processes. The two material NCP were energy; and medicinal, biochemical and genetic resources. The three non-material NCP were learning and inspiration; physical and psychological experience; and supporting identities. The NCP common to all categories was the maintenance of options, reflected in maintaining biodiversity (estimated in this case with the Shannon diversity index). The dataset contains information at both individual and plot level. Habitat creation and maintenance (NCP1) was calculated by computing the spatial connectivity of the plots in Q. ilex and Q. robur stands. It was inferred by calculating the percentage cover of broadleaved forest in a circular buffer (radius = 500 m) around each plot. Pollination and the dispersal of seeds and other propagules (NCP2) was estimated by counting all seedlings and saplings in each plot and divided them by the plot area to obtain the density of saplings per hectare. Climate regulation in terms of biological carbon (C) storage and sequestration (NCP4) was estimated by the overall C stock contained in the trees of the study plots. We calculated the total biomass per tree using species-specific allometric equations that combine the dbh and the height of the sampled trees. We also calculated the C stock per tree multiplying the obtained biomass by the percentage of C in each species. The regulation of detrimental organisms and biological processes (NCP10) was assessed using the percentage of invertebrate herbivory. For all except the J. thurifera case study, we determined herbivore damages by visually estimating the percentage of leaf area removed by invertebrates. Energy provision (NCP11) was understood as the production of biomass-based fuels such as fuelwood. We estimated biomass input from thick and medium branches (i.e. the tree parts normally employed as fuelwood) for each tree within plots. Biomass input from thick and medium branches was calculated from allometric equations specific for each species. The provision of medicinal, biochemical and genetic resources (NCP14) includes the production of plant genes and genetic information. In each plot we quantified gene diversity corrected for sample size as proxy for NCP14. The maintenance of options (NCP18) includes the benefits associated with species diversity. We scored woody species richness and abundance and computed the Shannon diversity index as proxy. Additionally, interviews regarding social perceptions related to learning and inspiration (NCP15), physical and psychological experiences (NCP16) and supporting identities (NCP17) were conducted at the case study level. Please notice that the social perception dataset is not uploaded to ensure data privacy policy. More information and detailed Methodology can be found in Martín-Forés et al. (2020) People and Nature, in both the main text and the Supplementary Material S1. [Usage Notes] Some values are missing because the methodology was adjusted according to each case study. For more information please read the detailed information provided by Martín-Forés et al. (2020) People and Nature, in both the main text and the Supplementary Material S1., [Context] European forests are expanding and becoming denser following the widespread abandonment of farmland and rural areas. Yet, little is known about the goods and services that spontaneous forest regrowth provide to people., [Aims] We assessed the changes in nature’s contributions to people (NCP) from spontaneous forest regrowth, i.e. forest expansion and densification, in South-West Europe., [Methods We investigated 65 forest plots in four different landscapes with contrasting ecological and societal contexts. Two landscapes are located in rural areas undergoing human exodus and forest expansion and densification; the other two, in peri-urban areas with intense land use and forest densification but negligible expansion. For each forest plot, we estimated variables related to ten out of the 18 main NCP defined by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). Regulating and material NCP were addressed using variables measured in the field as proxies. Non-material NCP were studied through stakeholder interviews., [Results] Our results show across the cases that forest expansion and densification is generally associated with greater climate regulation and energy provision. Changes in other NCP, especially in non-material ones, were strongly context-dependent. The social perception of spontaneous forest regrowth was primarily negative in rural areas and more positive in peri-urban landscapes., [Conclusion] Passive restoration through spontaneous forest expansion and densification can enhance regulating and material NCP, especially when adaptive management is applied. To optimise NCP and to increase the societal awareness of and interest in spontaneous forest regrowth, the effects of this process should be analysed in close coordination with local stakeholders to unveil and quantify the many and complex trade-offs involved in rural or peri-urban social perceptions., BiodivERsA, Award: BiodivERsA3-2015-58. Agencia Estatal de Investigación, Award: PCIN-2016-055. Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad, Gobierno de España, Award: CGL2017-83170-R. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. BiodivERsA, Award: BiodivERsA3-2015-58., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283251
Dataset. 2020

DATA FROM: SORPTION AND DESORPTION OF BICYCLOPYRONE ON SOILS

  • Spokas, K. A.
  • Gámiz, B.
  • Schneider, S. K.
  • Hall, K. E.
  • Chen, Wenlin
[Methods] Bicyclopyrone sorption was determined on each soil in triplicate using the batch equilibration method with radiolabeled compounds. The 14C spiking solution for BCP was prepared by diluting 14C-bicyclopyrone [pyridinyl-3-14C; specific activity = 95.3 µCi mg-1; 8,880 Bq mmol-1; 99.5% purity] with unlabeled BCP (Syngenta Crop Protection, LLC) to result in a stock solution of 10 mg L−1 with an overall activity of 1,090 Bq mL-1 (65,450 DPM mL-1). A 0.5 mL aliquot of this spiking solution was added to 9.5 mL of 0.01 M CaCl2 to achieve a 10 mL solution volume. This solution (0.5 mg L−1 BCP) was added to 1 g of soil in a 20 mL glass scintillation vial for a series of 25 different USDA soil series. Samples were then placed horizontally on a reciprocal shaker and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h (180 rev min-1) in the dark. Following centrifugation (20 min, 1500 × g), 2 mL of supernatant was removed and filtered (0.45 μm). Then a 1 mL aliquot of the filtered solution was mixed with 5 mL of scintillation cocktail [EcoLite(+)™; MP Biomedicals, LLC, Solon, OH] and analyzed for 14C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC) (HITACHI AccuFLEX LSC-8000, GMI Ramsey, MN, 10-minute counting window). No statistically significant sorption of the BCP to scintillation vials, syringes or syringe filters was observed (98-100% recovery, data not shown). The sorbed concentration of BCP on the soil was estimated by the following: Cs=Ci-CemV , where Ci is the initial concentration (mg L-1), Ce is the equilibrium concentration (mg L-1), V is the total volume of the liquid phase (L), and m is the mass of the soil (g). The equilibrium concentration was determined by the LSC of the liquid phase using the following equation: Ce=LSCe-Blank * CiLSCi , where LSCe is the disintegrations per minute of the sample following equilibration with the soil, Blank is the disintegrations per minute of the scintillation cocktail and vial alone, Ci is the liquid phase concentration of the initial standard (mg L-1), and LSCi are the disintegration of the corresponding BCP standards (without soil added). The partitioning coefficient (KD) is estimated by the following: KD= CSCe . Sorption Isotherms – Multiple Concentrations Sorption isotherms were generated for 7 selected soils which were selected based on the initial screening above for a range of observed KD values. The isotherm was determined utilizing initial BCP solution concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mg L−1. Individual samples were run in duplicate using methods analogous to the single concentration batch KD determination described earlier. Equilibrium liquid (Ce) and solid (Cs) concentrations were then analyzed by fitting to different linear forms of four sorption models: Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and the Dubinin-Radushkevich models (Horsfall, Spiff, & Abia, 2004; Hunt & He, 2015). [Usage Notes] Excel file with separate worksheets for the batch-isotherm (KD) and the multi-point isotherm datasets., Bicyclopyrone is a herbicide that is targeted for the control of herbicide-resistant weeds. However, there is a lack of extensive data on its sorption and factors that control its sorption in the soil system. In this study, we evaluated a series of 25 different soils, with a variety of soil properties to assess if an empirical relationship could be developed to predict the sorption coefficient for bicyclopyrone. Overall, there were no statistically significant relationships observed with organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, or clay content. There solely was a moderate negative correlation with soil pH (R=-0.65). Additionally, Freundlich isotherm analysis suggests that the KD could be adequate to characterize the sorption behavior for the range of soils evaluated here., Peer reviewed

Proyecto: //

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283257
Dataset. 2022

DATA FROM: THE SOURCES OF VARIATION FOR INDIVIDUAL PREY-TO-PREDATOR SIZE RATIOS

  • Henriques, Jorge
  • Lacava, Mariángeles
  • Guzmán, Celeste
  • Gavín-Centol, M.P.
  • Ruiz-Lupión, Dolores
  • Mas, Eva de
  • Magalhães, S.
  • Moya-Laraño, Jordi
[Methods] Spider collection Individuals of Lycosa fasciiventris were collected from June 23rd to July 27th 2015 in four different localities within the Almeria province (South-East Spain), in dry temporal washes (“ramblas”): 1) around Paraje las Palmerillas, Estación Experimental de Cajamar (36.7917°N, 2.6891°O); 2) near Boca de los Frailes village (36.8036°N, 2.1386°O); 3) near Carboneras village (36.9667°N, 2.1019°O) and 4) near Almanzora river (37.3414°N, 2.0078°O). Individuals were then kept separately in the laboratory in a container (22 x 18 x 18 cm) with the bottom filled with 2-3 cm of soil collected from the sampling sites. Two wooden blocks (10 x 8 x 1 cm and 3 x 5 x 1 cm) were added to each tank to provide shelter. Only sub-adult virgin females were used to form the laboratory population. All individuals (adult and sub-adult males, and sub-adult females) were fed once a week with size-matched crickets (Gryllus assimilis; Fabricius 1775) purchased from a pet supply online store Exofauna, Spain (available in: https://exofauna.com). Spiders had access to water ad libitum through a 40 ml vial filled with water and covered with cotton. Tanks were placed in a climate chamber with simulated outdoor climatic conditions (day and night temperature cycles and photoperiod with light fluorescent tubes of 54 W, mimicking natural sunshine, and a relative humidity from 50 to 65%). Climatic conditions were adjusted to the preceding weekly average conditions in the Almeria province, with day-night temperature and light oscillations (temperature: 18.7-34.3 °C; light-dark photoperiod: 17:7-16:8 hours). Breeding design To assess genetic, maternal and environmental variation in individual prey-to-predator size ratio (PPSR), we performed a paternal half-sib split-brood design (Roff 1997; Lynch and Walsh 1998), in which 52 males (sires) were each mated with two virgin females (dams). Each week, offspring were provided with fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster; Meigen, 1830) originated from cultures produced in the laboratory. Flies were fed with a nitrogen rich medium supplemented with high quality dogfood, which highly improves spider survival (Jensen et al. 2011). Maternal families were constituted by 12 offspring, split into two food availability treatments, varying in the number of flies provided. Thus, 3 out of 12 offspring from each maternal family were assigned to the rich environment, being given 3× the amount of food provided in the poor (or standard) environment. Initially, a single fly was offered to the spiders in the poor treatment and 3 flies in the richer treatment. This quantity was adjusted to 3 and 9 when individuals were approximately 6 months old due to higher food demand at that stage. After hatching, spiderlings of wolf spiders climb to the female back and, in L. fasciiventris, remain with it for a period of a few weeks (Parellada 1998). Due to logistic reasons, all spiderlings were removed from the female back within one week, that is approximately 42 ± 8 (mean ± SD) days after they hatched (age at isolation). To estimate and control for post-hatching common environmental effects occurring on the female back, the age at isolation was included in all models. This variable was never significant (data not shown). Spiderlings were carefully collected from the female back with the help of a paintbrush. We took 12 spiderlings from each female and placed them separately in cylindrical containers (5 cm height and 6 cm diameter). Each container had the bottom covered with filter paper, providing a substrate for both locomotion and absorption of excreta, inside the growth chamber. Filter papers were checked weekly and replaced if necessary. A plastic tip was inserted at the bottom of the container, filled with cotton connected to a reservoir, providing water ad libitum to spiders by capillarity (Moskalik and Uetz 2011). The 1248 spiderling containers were then randomly arranged within the growth chamber to ensure that individuals belonging to the same family were spatially interspersed. This allowed mitigating possible common environmental effects after spiderling isolation from their mothers. Morphometry Body components were divided between structural body size (carapace width; Hagstrum 1971) and body condition (residuals of abdomen width on carapace width; (Jakob et al. 1996). Body condition reflects energy and nutrient storage independently on the size of the spider and thus reflects hunger level (Moya-Laraño et al. 2008). Structural body size may reflect the strength to subdue prey (e.g., Moya-Laraño et al. 2002). Both carapace and abdomen width were measured at their widest point. Body size and body condition were measured in two instances: after individuals were taken from their mothers and isolated, and immediately before the trials for acceptance. Morphometric measurements were taken to the nearest 0.1 mm with a dissection microscope (Leica MZ125). While structural body size measured at the time of trial was needed to calculate prey-to-predator size ratio, body condition at the time of the trial was used to control for the hunger state of each spiderling (i.e. its motivational state). These traits were also measured early in life and used to calculate genetic and maternal correlations, to test how maternal investment in both offspring body size and condition could affect behavioural patterns of the spiders later in life. Prey acceptance This experiment aimed to measure the maximum relative size of a prey cricket (Gryllus assimilis) that a spider accepted, considering a range of cricket lengths (in mm) decreasing from 5× to 1× (in units of 1) the carapace width of the spider. For that, we placed them in experimental arenas where each spider was offered crickets in a decreasing order of relative size until it subdued and killed a cricket. The response variable, prey-to-predator size ratio (PPSR) is the ratio at which the spider attacks and kills the cricket. This measure corresponds to the maximum PPSR (PPSRmax) at which predators kill their prey and the larger the relative size of the prey killed, the higher the PPSR. Spiders were measured in blocks of 17 ± 5 (mean ± SD) individuals. Each block was defined as the experimental batch of individuals assessed in each day. Although this cricket species does not occur in the study site, L. fasciiventris is able to effectively prey on it, and a similar species with similar body size, Gryllus bimaculatus, is highly abundant in the collection area (Moya-laraño personal observation). As it was not feasible to collect G. bimaculatus in numbers enough to carry out this study, we used G. assimilis individuals from an established laboratory population. Note that this approach allowed testing the response of spiders that were naive to this prey, as all spiders had been fed with Drosophila to that point. Thus, this approach minimized environmental variation due to potential effects of previous experiences with cricket prey. In the trial, we used crickets with a length that differed from the target PPSR (5×, 4×, 3×, 2× or 1× of the width of the spider carapace) by less than 0.2 units. Crickets were weighted, and their length determined from a calibration curve, previously generated with the weight and length of 40 crickets: L = 3.22 + 0.32log(M); R2 = 0.99; p < 0.0001; where L is cricket body length (in mm) and M is cricket body mass (in mg). Mass was measured to the nearest 0.1 mg using a high precision scale (Mettler Toledo XP26). None of the crickets were used in more than one trial. To standardize hunger levels across individuals, spiders were left to starve for seven days before being tested, similarly to other studies (Persons and Rypstra 2000). As it was not possible to standardize age across trials, individuals were randomly assigned to each trial. Spider age at the time of each measurement (331 ± 30 days old, mean ± SD) was recorded and later controlled for in the statistical analysis as a covariate (see below). A single spider and one cricket were placed inside the arena (7.5 cm diameter), in opposite sides, within enclosed inverted plastic vials (3 cm diameter). Then, both vials were gently lifted simultaneously, and crickets and spiders were allowed to interact for 6 minutes. If the cricket was not captured and subdued, the spider was enclosed in the vial and the cricket was removed. Spiders were then left to recover in the vial for 30 minutes until a new cricket from the next immediately lower size was presented (lower PPSR). Trials ended as soon as the spider attacked and killed a cricket or if the spider did not catch the smallest (1×) cricket. [Usage Notes] Data used to assess the sources of variation of the maximum prey-to-predator size ratio (PPSRmax) in juveniles of the wolf spider Lycosa fasciiventris using a paternal half-sib split brood design., The relative body size at which predators are willing to attack prey, a key trait for predator-prey interactions, is usually considered invariant. However, this ratio can vary widely among individuals or populations. Identifying the range and origin of such variation is key to understanding the strength and constraints on selection in both predators and prey. Still, these sources of variation remain largely unknown. We filled this gap by measuring the genetic, maternal and environmental variation of the maximum prey-to-predator size ratio (PPSRmax) in juveniles of the wolf spider Lycosa fasciiventris using a paternal half-sib split brood design, in which each male was paired with two different females and the offspring reared in two different food environments: poor and rich. Each juvenile spider was then sequentially offered crickets of decreasing size and the maximum prey size killed was determined. We also measured body size and body condition of spiders upon emergence and just before the trial. We found low, but significant heritability (h2=0.069) and dominance and common environmental variance (d2+4c2=0.056). PPSRmax was also partially explained by body condition (during trial) but there was no effect of the rearing food environment. Finally, a maternal correlation between body size early in life and PPSRmax indicated that offspring born larger were less predisposed to feed on larger prey later in life. Therefore, PPSRmax, a central trait in ecosystems, can vary widely and this variation is due to different sources, with important consequences for changes in this trait in the short and long terms., Ministry of Education and Science, Award: Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation):PD/BD/106059/2015. Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte, Award: FPU13/04933. Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, Award: CGL2015-66192-R., Peer reviewed


Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/283270
Dataset. 2021

EFFECTS OF EPISODIC NUTRIENTS ENRICHMENTS ON P-LIMITED PLANKTONIC COMMUNITIES: LAKE REDON ENEX 2013 EXPERIMENT

  • Catalán, Jordi
  • Felip, Marisol
  • Giménez-Grau, Pau
  • Zufiaurre, Aitziber
  • Camarero, Lluís
  • Pla Rabès, Sergi
[Methods] Analytical methods are described in the associated publication: Giménez-Grau, P., Felip, M., Zufiaurre, A., Pla-Rabès, S., Camarero, L. & Catalan, J. (2020) Homeostasis and non-linear changes in the stoichiometry of P limited planktonic communities. Ecosphere,11:e03249 [Usage Notes] Initial reference conditions in the lake water column were sampled during three dates. They are reported separately, but they should be amalgamated if used as initial experimental conditions. There are a few missing values across the biogeochemical data. Data from the enclosure water column and the sediment traps are reported in separated files., Planktonic communities are naturally subjected to episodic nutrient enrichments that may stress or redress the imbalances in limiting nutrients. Human-enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition has caused profound N:P imbalance in many remote oligotrophic lakes in which phosphorus has largely become limiting. These lakes offer an opportunity to investigate the planktonic community response to nutrient fluctuations in P-limited conditions. The ENEX experiment in Lake Redon (Pyrenees), performed during August 2013, aimed to investigate the structural and stoichiometric effects of pulse nutrient additions on P-limited planktonic communities. We performed P (PO43-), and N (NH4+ or NO3-) additions to the summer epilimnetic community of the ultraoligotrophic lake using self-filling ~100 L enclosures and analysed the response to varying P availability, N:P imbalance, and N source. The nutrient additions were gradients within the range of values seasonally found in the lake and other oligotrophic lakes of the Pyrenees, with a further P level typical of mesotrophic lakes to provided non-limiting conditions., Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: CGL2010–19737. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: CGL2016–80124-C2-1-P. Generalitat de Catalunya, Award: 2017 SGR 910. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: FPI BES-2014-070196. Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte, Award: FPU AP2010-3596., Peer reviewed


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