Publicación Artículo científico (article).

The importance of including survival release costs when assessing viability in reptile translocations

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/281735
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Bertolero, Albert
  • Pretus, Joan Lluís
  • Oro, Daniel
Translocations to restore populations of endangered species are an important conservation tool, but a reliable diagnosis is needed to assess their success. We used capture-recapture modeling to analyze the adult apparent survival of released and resident tortoises in two translocation projects in Spain monitored for 14 and 29 years. We tested if long-term survival rates differ between released and resident individuals, if survival was lower during the phase of establishment (i.e. release cost), how long acclimation lasts and if increased density due to releases affects survival. We found lower survival of released tortoises during the phase of establishment (1 to 3 years) when residents were already present. After establishment, survival was very high and unaffected by density-dependence. Body condition before release was similar between recaptured and dead/missing tortoises, and did not predict establishment survival. Stochastic population viability analysis showed that success when releasing small numbers of individuals strongly depends upon adult long-term survival. Release of small second batches of tortoises was not sensitive to a growing population, regardless of its release timing. Our results highlight long-term survival as crucial in translocation projects of long-lived species, invalidating short-term (first year) survival assessment, when survival release cost does not match long-term survival. A release cost of different duration should be included in model estimation before modeling predictions. Releasing tortoises (for welfare of captive individuals or for mitigating human negative impacts) in an already established population is not recommended under most circumstances. Acclimation cost is followed by survival approaching wild counterparts. If this milestone is not achieved, the project needs to be carefully assessed to adopt other management options or should be stopped altogether., The regional governments of Catalonia and the Balearic Islands (Generalitat of Catalonia and the Govern de les Illes Balears) and Organismo Autónomo de Parques Nacionales (Ministerio Agricultura, Alimentación y Medio Ambiente, Gobierno de España) authorized our scientific work. Field work in the Ebro Delta and Minorca was partially funded by the Ebro Delta Natural Park, the Generalitat de Catalunya, the Institut Menorquí d'Estudis (IME), the Consell Insular de Menorca and the Spanish Ministry of Science and Technology (CICYT CGL2004-0473/BOS). AB is especially grateful to the Ebro Delta Natural Park staff that recognizes the importance of long-term monitoring programs. We are grateful to Evarist Coll from the GOB Menorca for kindly providing the released tortoises data. We thank several field workers who helped collect the data, especially Marta Massana, for their valuable assistance during several years, and Sam Pons and family for their friendly help and warm hospitality at Minorca. We are grateful to the two anonymous reviewers for improving the manuscript. We are also grateful to Elizabeth Rochon and Jacqueline Donoyan for improving the English on early draft., Peer reviewed
 
DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/281735
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/281735

HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/281735
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/281735
 
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/281735
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/281735

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/281735
Artículo científico (article). 2022

THE IMPORTANCE OF INCLUDING SURVIVAL RELEASE COSTS WHEN ASSESSING VIABILITY IN REPTILE TRANSLOCATIONS

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Bertolero, Albert
  • Pretus, Joan Lluís
  • Oro, Daniel
Translocations to restore populations of endangered species are an important conservation tool, but a reliable diagnosis is needed to assess their success. We used capture-recapture modeling to analyze the adult apparent survival of released and resident tortoises in two translocation projects in Spain monitored for 14 and 29 years. We tested if long-term survival rates differ between released and resident individuals, if survival was lower during the phase of establishment (i.e. release cost), how long acclimation lasts and if increased density due to releases affects survival. We found lower survival of released tortoises during the phase of establishment (1 to 3 years) when residents were already present. After establishment, survival was very high and unaffected by density-dependence. Body condition before release was similar between recaptured and dead/missing tortoises, and did not predict establishment survival. Stochastic population viability analysis showed that success when releasing small numbers of individuals strongly depends upon adult long-term survival. Release of small second batches of tortoises was not sensitive to a growing population, regardless of its release timing. Our results highlight long-term survival as crucial in translocation projects of long-lived species, invalidating short-term (first year) survival assessment, when survival release cost does not match long-term survival. A release cost of different duration should be included in model estimation before modeling predictions. Releasing tortoises (for welfare of captive individuals or for mitigating human negative impacts) in an already established population is not recommended under most circumstances. Acclimation cost is followed by survival approaching wild counterparts. If this milestone is not achieved, the project needs to be carefully assessed to adopt other management options or should be stopped altogether., The regional governments of Catalonia and the Balearic Islands (Generalitat of Catalonia and the Govern de les Illes Balears) and Organismo Autónomo de Parques Nacionales (Ministerio Agricultura, Alimentación y Medio Ambiente, Gobierno de España) authorized our scientific work. Field work in the Ebro Delta and Minorca was partially funded by the Ebro Delta Natural Park, the Generalitat de Catalunya, the Institut Menorquí d'Estudis (IME), the Consell Insular de Menorca and the Spanish Ministry of Science and Technology (CICYT CGL2004-0473/BOS). AB is especially grateful to the Ebro Delta Natural Park staff that recognizes the importance of long-term monitoring programs. We are grateful to Evarist Coll from the GOB Menorca for kindly providing the released tortoises data. We thank several field workers who helped collect the data, especially Marta Massana, for their valuable assistance during several years, and Sam Pons and family for their friendly help and warm hospitality at Minorca. We are grateful to the two anonymous reviewers for improving the manuscript. We are also grateful to Elizabeth Rochon and Jacqueline Donoyan for improving the English on early draft., Peer reviewed




Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/156967
Dataset. 2017

THE IMPORTANCE OF INCLUDING SURVIVAL RELEASE COSTS WHEN ASSESSING VIABILITY IN REPTILE TRANSLOCATIONS [DATASET]

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Bertolero, Albert
  • Pretus, Joan Lluís
  • Oro, Daniel
Datasets supporting the results of the article “The importance of including survival release costs when assessing viability in reptile translocations”. The readme files contain information about each data column. Questions should be addressed to Albert Bertolero (albert.bertolero@gmail.com)., Translocations to restore populations of endangered species are an important conservation tool, but a reliable diagnosis is needed to assess their success. We used capture-recapture modeling to analyze the adult apparent survival of released and resident tortoises in two translocation projects in Spain monitored for 14 and 29 years. We tested if long-term survival rates differ between released and resident individuals, if survival was lower during the phase of establishment (i.e. release cost), how long acclimation lasts and if increased density due to releases affects survival. We found lower survival of released tortoises during the phase of establishment (1 to 3 years) when residents were already present. After establishment, survival was very high and unaffected by density-dependence. Body condition before release was similar between recaptured and dead/missing tortoises, and did not predict establishment survival. Stochastic population viability analysis showed that success when releasing small numbers of individuals strongly depends upon adult long-term survival. Release of small second batches of tortoises was not sensitive to a growing population, regardless of its release timing. Our results highlight long-term survival as crucial in translocation projects of long-lived species, invalidating short-term (first year) survival assessment, when survival release cost does not match long-term survival. A release cost of different duration should be included in model estimation before modeling predictions. Releasing tortoises (for welfare of captive individuals or for mitigating human negative impacts) in an already established population is not recommended under most circumstances. Acclimation cost is followed by survival approaching wild counterparts. If this milestone is not achieved, the project needs to be carefully assessed to adopt other management options or should be stopped altogether., Field work in the Ebro Delta and Minorca was partially funded by the Ebro Delta Natural Park, the Generalitat de Catalunya, the Institut Menorquí d'Estudis (IME), the Consell Insular de Menorca and the Spanish Ministry of Science and Technology (CICYT CGL2004-0473/BOS)., Peer reviewed




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