Dataset.

Does the temperature-size rule apply to marine protozoans after proper acclimation? [Dataset]

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Calbet, Albert
  • Saiz, Enric
The temperature-size rule hypothesized that there is a negative relationship between the size (volume) of an organism and the temperature. This applies to both unicellular and pluricellular organisms. Here, we question this hypothesis for the particular case of protozoans, because in these organisms the volume is directly related to the consumption of prey, and on most of the occasions the true volume of the cell is unknown. To prove our arguments, we designed a series of experiments with the heterotrophic dinoflagellate O. marina, including functional and numerical responses, time-dependent acclimation responses, and estimation of the protozoan volume during long periods of starvation. Our data showed that, in fact, the observed temperature-size rule in unicellular grazers results from anabolic and catabolic imbalances, and that the relationship between size and temperature weakens after proper thermal adaptation. We also showed that once prey are fully digested, the protozoan’ size is the same irrespectively of the temperature. Finally, we set the basis for proper acclimation during short-term temperature experiments, which specifies that at least 3 days should be allowed for proper temperature acclimation. We also suggest that, for trustable experiments, the grazer should be incubated at the target prey concentration for at least 24h before conducting the experiments. The ecological implications of a lack of correlation between microzooplankton size and temperature are also discussed, This research was funded by Grant PID2020-118645RB-I00 by Ministerio de Ciencia e innovación (MCIN)/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033 and by “ERDF A way of making Europe”. It is a contribution of the Marine Zooplankton Ecology Group (2017 SGR 87). With the institutional support of the ‘Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence’ accreditation (CEX2019-000928-S), Para Oxyrrhis marina: Tasas de ingestion a diferentes concentraciones de alimento (presa/ind/d), Tasa crecimiento (µ 1/d), Volumen (µm3); para la presa (Rhodomonas salina): volume (µm3), Peer reviewed
 

DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280235, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14754
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235

HANDLE: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280235, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14754
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235
 
Ver en: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/280235, https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14754
Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/333992
Artículo científico (article). 2023

DOES THE TEMPERATURE-SIZE RULE APPLY TO MARINE PROTOZOANS?

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Calbet, Albert
  • Saiz, Enric
This article is a contribution from the Marine Zooplankton Ecology Lab at the ICM, CSIC.-- 13 pages, 6 figures, supporting information https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.14356.-- The datasets generated for this study can be found in the Digital CSIC repository https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/14754. (Calbet & Saiz, 2023), The temperature–size rule suggests that there is a negative relationship between the size (volume) of an ectothermic organism and the environmental temperature experienced during its development We question how to validate this hypothesis for the particular case of some algivorous protozoans because in many of these unicellular organisms, body size is directly related to the consumption of prey and, on most occasions, the true size of the cell is uncertain. In our opinion, to approach this question, the actual size of the protozoan should be measured when the prey are fully digested. To prove our arguments, we designed a series of experiments with the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, including functional and numerical responses, time-dependent acclimation responses and the estimation of the protozoan volume during absence of food. We found that after the digestion of the prey Rhodomonas salina, the size of our long-term thermally acclimated strains of Oxyrrhis marina was the same regardless of the temperature (16 and 22°C). We believe that previous reports showing protozoan size reduction because of temperature might actually reflect imbalances between ingestion and digestion of prey, perhaps amplified by insufficient acclimation. In support of the previous argument, we found evidence that short-term temperature exposure experiments may suggest a negative relationship between well-fed protozoan size and temperature, although this was not observed after long-term acclimation. In light of the results presented here, we suggest that the actual evidence supporting the temperature–size rule in algivorous protozoans may not be sufficiently conclusive because most of the present studies largely ignore the effect of prey presence on the grazer's volume and are usually based on short-term responses to temperature, This research was funded by Grant PID2020-118645RB-I00 by Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MCIN)/AEI/10.13039/501100011033. With the institutional support of the ‘Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence’ accreditation (CEX2019-000928-S). The open access publication fee was covered by the CSIC Open Access Publication Support Initiative through its Unit of Information Resources for Research (URICI), Peer reviewed




Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
oai:digital.csic.es:10261/280235
Dataset. 2022

DOES THE TEMPERATURE-SIZE RULE APPLY TO MARINE PROTOZOANS AFTER PROPER ACCLIMATION? [DATASET]

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Calbet, Albert
  • Saiz, Enric
The temperature-size rule hypothesized that there is a negative relationship between the size (volume) of an organism and the temperature. This applies to both unicellular and pluricellular organisms. Here, we question this hypothesis for the particular case of protozoans, because in these organisms the volume is directly related to the consumption of prey, and on most of the occasions the true volume of the cell is unknown. To prove our arguments, we designed a series of experiments with the heterotrophic dinoflagellate O. marina, including functional and numerical responses, time-dependent acclimation responses, and estimation of the protozoan volume during long periods of starvation. Our data showed that, in fact, the observed temperature-size rule in unicellular grazers results from anabolic and catabolic imbalances, and that the relationship between size and temperature weakens after proper thermal adaptation. We also showed that once prey are fully digested, the protozoan’ size is the same irrespectively of the temperature. Finally, we set the basis for proper acclimation during short-term temperature experiments, which specifies that at least 3 days should be allowed for proper temperature acclimation. We also suggest that, for trustable experiments, the grazer should be incubated at the target prey concentration for at least 24h before conducting the experiments. The ecological implications of a lack of correlation between microzooplankton size and temperature are also discussed, This research was funded by Grant PID2020-118645RB-I00 by Ministerio de Ciencia e innovación (MCIN)/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033 and by “ERDF A way of making Europe”. It is a contribution of the Marine Zooplankton Ecology Group (2017 SGR 87). With the institutional support of the ‘Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence’ accreditation (CEX2019-000928-S), Para Oxyrrhis marina: Tasas de ingestion a diferentes concentraciones de alimento (presa/ind/d), Tasa crecimiento (µ 1/d), Volumen (µm3); para la presa (Rhodomonas salina): volume (µm3), Peer reviewed





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