ECOLOGIA, SOCIEDAD Y GESTION DE FAUNA: EL CONEJO EN LA PENINSULA IBERICA

CGL2013-43197-R

Nombre agencia financiadora Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad
Acrónimo agencia financiadora MINECO
Programa Programa Estatal de Fomento de la Investigación Científica y Técnica de Excelencia
Subprograma Subprograma Estatal de Generación del Conocimiento
Convocatoria Retos Investigación: Proyectos de I+D+I
Año convocatoria 2013
Unidad de gestión Dirección General de Investigación Científica y Técnica
Centro beneficiario AGENCIA ESTATAL CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENTIFICAS (CSIC)
Centro realización INSTITUTO DE ESTUDIOS SOCIALES AVANZADOS (IESA) (Centro Mixto CSIC-JA)
Identificador persistente http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003329

Publicaciones

Found(s) 12 result(s)
Found(s) 1 page(s)

Can widespread generalist predators affect keystone prey? A case study with red foxes and European rabbits in their native range

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Fernández-de-Simón, Javier
  • Díaz-Ruiz, Francisco
  • Rodríguez-de la Cruz, Manuel
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
  • Ferreras, Pablo
Widespread generalist predators may affect declining keystone prey populations. However, this phenomenon is not well understood. In this paper, we assessed whether the abundance and population growth of European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus, a keystone prey species in Mediterranean Iberia, was related to the abundance and diet of red foxes, Vulpes vulpes, a widespread generalist predator. In a locality in central Spain, where rabbit population abundance declined, we estimated rabbit abundance during almost 3 years and determined fox abundance and diet during two concurrent years. We calculated a fox predation index (percentage of consumed rabbit biomass × fox abundance) to assess the importance of rabbits to foxes. We employed a multi–model approach to explain rabbit abundance and population growth. Foxes consumed between 60 and 99 % rabbit biomass in their diets, and this was independent of rabbit abundance. Periods of higher fox predation index coincided with lower rabbit density and vice versa. Two models best explained rabbit abundance and four rabbit population growth. They included the fox predation index and its interaction with rabbit abundance during the previous month. Altogether, fox predation, intraspecific density dependence, and their interaction partly explained rabbit population dynamics. We conclude that in order to propel the recovery of the rabbit in Iberia, it is essential to better understand the role of these factors in driving the abundance of the species., This is a partial result from the I+D National Plan Projects CGL2005-02340, CGL2009-10741 and CGL2013-43197, funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and EU FEDER funds. JFdS benefitted from a FPI PhD scholarship (BES-
2006-12562) funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and the European Social Fund. J. Fernandez-de-Simon and F. Díaz-Ruiz are currently holding a postdoctoral fellowship from Junta de Castilla-La Mancha and the European Social Fund (Operational Programme FSE 2007/2013). M. Delibes-Mateos is currently funded
by Junta de Andalucía and the EU FP7, under grant agreement 267226., Peer Reviewed




Functional responses to changes in rabbit abundance: is the eagle owl a generalist or a specialist predator?

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Tobajas, Jorge
  • Fernández-de-Simón, Javier
  • Díaz-Ruiz, Francisco
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
  • Ferreras, Pablo
How foraging behaviour of predators is influenced by prey abundance is often not clear. Predators may behave as generalist or specialist depending on the relationship between the predator feeding behaviour and prey abundance, known as functional response. The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a key species for most Iberian vertebrate predators, especially for large raptors such as the eagle owl (Bubo bubo). The eagle owl functional response was analysed in central Iberian Peninsula by fitting different models (null, linear, two asymptotic and two sigmoidal models) between rabbit abundance and rabbit consumption by the eagle owl. Rabbit consumption increased as did its abundance until reaching an asymptote. Rabbit-consumed biomass better fitted to a type II functional response (convex, typical of specialist predators), whereas rabbit frequency in eagle owl diet better fitted to a type III functional response (sigmoidal, typical of generalist predators). Trophic diversity increased as rabbit abundance decreased. The consumption of other prey, such as Iberian hare (Lepus granatensis) and medium-size birds (mainly galliformes and columbiformes), increased as rabbit abundance decreased. The eagle owl is highly dependent on rabbits in central Spain, even at low rabbit abundance. In this situation, the eagle owl diversifies its diet, making it difficult to define the eagle owl as a specialist or as a generalist predator. Therefore, the eagle owl in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula should be rather considered as a facultative predator on wild rabbits., This study is a partial result of CGL2005–02340, CGL2009–10741, and CGL2013-43197 projects, from I+D National Plan funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and EU–FEDER funds. J. Fernandez-de-Simon benefitted from a FPI PhD scholarship (BES–2006–12562) funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and the European Social Fund. J. Fernandez-de-Simon and F. Diaz-Ruiz are currently holding a postdoctoral fellowship from Junta de Castilla-La Mancha and the European Social Fund (Operational Programme FSE 2007/2013)., Peer Reviewed




Optimization and accuracy of faecal pellet count estimates of population size: The case of European rabbits in extensive breeding nuclei

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Rouco, Carlos
  • Santoro, Simone
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
Cost-effective indices to estimate relative abundances of species are crucial for their management and conservation. As an example, population indices are needed to monitor extensive breeding nuclei used for translocating wild rabbit populations. Based on counts of faecal pellets from four high density rabbit nuclei in southwest Spain: (i) we assess the accuracy of this population index in high-density populations; and (ii) present a simulation approach to evaluate how the reduction of the counting effort affects accuracy of the population estimates. Our findings suggest that this method provides a valid estimate in high-density rabbit populations, and, notably, estimates would have not substantially changed after a reduction of 45–65% in the number of counted plots depending on variation on rabbit density between nuclei. We provide a framework that managers and other scientists could use to improve data collection of pellet counts in order to optimize their chances of detecting relative abundance estimates of rabbits. In addition, we present a R function to implement our approach that can easily be applied in a variety of monitoring programmes for other species based on count data. This will likely help to reduce field-effort in different studies without compromising population indices estimates., Funding was provided by Confederación Hidrográfica del Guadalquivir and research project CGL2013-43197. C. Rouco and M. Delibes-Mateos are supported by the Talentia Postdoc Program launched by the Andalusian Knowledge Agency, co-funded by the European Union's Seventh Framework Program, the Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions (COFUND–Grant Agreement n° 291780 and 267226, respectively), and the Ministry of Economy, Innovation, Science and Employment of the Junta de Andalucía., Peer Reviewed




Large-scale assessment of myxomatosis prevalence in European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) 60 years after first outbreak in Spain

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
  • Castro, Francisca
  • Ramírez, Esther
  • Cotilla, Irene
  • Parra, Francisco
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Recuerda, Pilar
  • Rouco, Carlos
Myxomatosis is a viral disease that affects European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) worldwide. In Spain, populations of wild rabbits drastically decreased in the 1950s after the first outbreak of myxomatosis. Since that first appearance, it seems to be an annual epizootic in Spain with periodic outbreaks, predominantly in summer and autumn. Taking into account rabbit population structure, abundance, and genetic lineage, this paper attempts to make a large-scale characterization of myxomatosis seroprevalence based on the immune status of 29 rabbit populations distributed throughout Spain, where O. cuniculus cuniculus and O. c. algirus, the two known rabbit subspecies, naturally inhabit. A total of 654 samples were collected between 2003 and 2009, and seroprevalence of antibodies against Myxoma virus (MYXV) was determined. Overall, our results revealed that 53% of the rabbit samples were positive to antibodies against MYXV. Newborn and juvenile rabbits were the most susceptible animals to the virus, with 19% and 16% seropositivity for newborn and juveniles, respectively, while adult rabbits were the most protected, with 65% of seropositive samples. This suggests that prevalence is negatively related to the proportion of newborn and juvenile rabbits in a population. Our results also showed that seroprevalence against MYXV tended to be higher in high-abundance populations. In contrast, no differences were detected in seroprevalence between rabbit subspecies. This study confirms that > 60 years since first outbreak, myxomatosis is an endemic disease in Spain. Based on the results, the establishment of a myxomatosis surveillance protocol is proposed., C. Rouco is supported by the Talent Hub Program launched by the Andalusian Knowledge Agency, co-funded by the European Union Seventh Framework Program, the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (COFUND–Grant Agreement no. 291780), and the Ministry of Economy, Innovation, Science and Employment, Government of Andalucía. M. Delibes-Mateos is supported by V Plan Propio de Investigación of the University of Sevilla. Special thanks to P. Ferreras, C. Ferreira, I. Barrio, F. Aparicio, L.E. Mínguez and C. Iriarte for support during field work. Funding was provided by the projects PEII 09-0097-4363, FAU2006-00014-C02-02, and CGL2013-43197-R all cofounded by EUFEDER funds., Peer Reviewed




A genomic map of clinal variation across the European rabbit hybrid zone

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Rafati, Nima
  • Blanco-Aguiar, José Antonio
  • Rubin, Carl-Johan
  • Sayyab, Shumaila
  • Sabatino, Stephen J.
  • Afonso, Sandra
  • Feng, Chungang
  • Alves, Paulo C.
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
  • Ferrand, Nuno
  • Andersson, Leif
  • Carneiro, Miguel
Speciation is a process proceeding from weak to complete reproductive isolation. In this continuum, naturally hybridizing taxa provide a promising avenue for revealing the genetic changes associated with the incipient stages of speciation. To identify such changes between two subspecies of rabbits that display partial reproductive isolation, we studied patterns of allele frequency change across their hybrid zone using whole-genome sequencing. To connect levels and patterns of genetic differentiation with phenotypic manifestations of subfertility in hybrid rabbits, we further investigated patterns of gene expression in testis. Geographic cline analysis revealed 253 regions characterized by steep changes in allele frequency across their natural region of contact. This catalog of regions is likely to be enriched for loci implicated in reproductive barriers and yielded several insights into the evolution of hybrid dysfunction in rabbits: (i) incomplete reproductive isolation is likely governed by the effects of many loci, (ii) protein–protein interaction analysis suggest that genes within these loci interact more than expected by chance, (iii) regulatory variation is likely the primary driver of incompatibilities, and (iv) large chromosomal rearrangements appear not to be a major mechanism underlying incompatibilities or promoting isolation in the face of gene flow. We detected extensive misregulation of gene expression in testis of hybrid males, but not a statistical overrepresentation of differentially expressed genes in candidate regions. Our results also did not support an X chromosome-wide disruption of expression as observed in mice and cats, suggesting variation in the mechanistic basis of hybrid male reduced fertility among mammals., The work was supported by POPH-QREN funds from the European Social Fund and Portuguese MCTES [FCT Investigator (IF/00283/2014/CP1256/CT0012) and postdoc grant to MC (SFRH/BPD/72343/2010); postdoc grants to JAB-A (SFRH/BPD/65464/2009) and SJS (SFRH/BPD/99138/2013)]; by the ERC project BATESON to LA; by FEDER funds through the COMPETE programme and Portuguese national funds through the FCT (projects PTDC/CVT/122943/2010 and PTDC/BIA/EVF/111368/2009); by the projects“Genomics and Evolutionary Biology” and “Genomics Applied to Genetic Resources” cofinanced by North Portugal Regional Operational Programme 2007/2013 (ON.2—O Novo Norte) under the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), by I+D National Plan Project CGL2013-43197-R financed by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, by an EU FP7 REGPOT grant [CIBIO-New-Gen] [286431] and by travel grants to MC (COST Action TD1101)., Peer Reviewed




Developing a quantitative hunting regionalization framework: A new game management tool

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Ríos-Saldaña, Carlos Antonio
  • Farfán, Miguel Ángel
  • Castro, Francisca
  • Vargas, J. Mario
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
[Aim of study]: Monitoring and control the hunting activity is primordial to guarantee its sustainability. However, the governmental agencies responsible to manage hunting commonly are unable to adequately do this job because the thousands of small private hunting states, associated exclusively by political-administrative criteria. In this work, we provided a new management tool through the establishment of a hunting regions system. [Area of study]: Castilla-La Mancha region, central Spain. [Material and methods]: We used a two-stage procedure to establish the environmental units than, afterwards, were characterized on a set of hunting variables. [Main results]: We generate a hunting regionalization with 12 hunting regions and proposed regional hunting yields for each of the hunting regions. [Research highlights]: The use of hunting regions will permit to define the game management practices more appropriately on a large scale, but also, will facilitate the tasks of assessment, management and monitoring of game of the number hunting states included in each hunting region., Funding was provided by project CGL2013-43197-R, cofounded by EUFEDER funds; National Council on Science and Technology of Mexico, CONACyT (doctoral grant to CARS)., Peer Reviewed




First assessment of the potential introduction by hunters of eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) in Spain

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Castro, Francisca
  • Piorno, Vicente
  • Ramírez, Esther
  • Blanco-Aguiar, José Antonio
  • Aparicio, Fernando
  • Mínguez, Luis E.
  • Ferreira, C. C.
  • Rouco, Carlos
  • Ríos-Saldaña, Carlos Antonio
  • Recuerda, Pilar
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
[Context]: Humans have introduced lagomorph species in areas outside their native ranges for their meat, fur or value as game species. Assessing the rate of success of lagomorph introductions is vital to address the ecological damage they may cause. Cases of failed lagomorph introductions in apparently suitable areas may also shed light on mechanisms that may deter invasion, which are useful in developing strategies for population control. In Spain, it has been suggested that hunters introduced the non-native eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) to compensate for the recent drastic declines of the native European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). [Aims]: Our main goals were to investigate (1) whether Sylvilagus rabbits have indeed been introduced by hunters across Spain, and (2) whether the species has become established in Spanish ecosystems. [Methods]: We interviewed 311 hunters or naturalists across Spain. The questionnaires inquired about the characteristics of game management in each locality, including the frequency of rabbit restocking, and particularly whether Sylvilagus rabbits had been released in the surveyed localities. In addition, we sampled 192 rabbit populations (n = 3974 individuals) across Spain by using molecular analysis to determine whether Sylvilagus rabbits were present in these areas. [Key results]: Our interview results suggest that Sylvilagus rabbits may have been released in 6% of the 311 localities surveyed. However, molecular analyses failed to confirm their persistence, because all samples belonged to O. cuniculus. [Conclusions]: We infer that Sylvilagus rabbits failed to establish themselves in Spain, although interviewees reported their introduction. Several reasons may explain the unsuccessful establishment of this species, such as a low propagule pressure, competition with native species, predation, inability to cope with local pathogens and unsuitable climatic conditions. [Implications]: The risk of future introductions of non-native game species can be reduced through the implementation of stricter regulations of animal releases into the wild. Long-term monitoring networks should be developed to help identify non-native game species before they become established and spread to neighbouring areas, thereby preventing any ecological or economic impacts these species may cause., This study was partially financed with the projects ‘Diagnosis of the effects of rabbit populations on crops in Catalonia’ and ‘Genetic characterisation of the rabbit populations in Valencia’, funded by Forestal Catalana and Vaersa. S.A., respectively, and the projects PAI06-170, VP-0119-07, POII09-0099-2557, CGL2009-11665, 2012-30E060, and CGL2013-43197-R. M. Delibes-Mateos was supported by V Plan Propio de Investigación of the Universidad de Sevilla. C. Campos Ferreira is supported by a Marie Curie Outgoing International Fellowship for Career Development (PIOF-GA-2013-621571) within the 7th Framework Program of the European Union. C. Rouco was also supported by XXII Propio de Investigación of the
University of Córdoba and ‘Programa Operativo de fondos FEDER Andalucía’., Peer Reviewed




Attitudes towards European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in farmland areas within Spain

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge
  • Arroyo, Beatriz
  • Redpath, Steve
  • Garrido, Fernando
  • Moyano Estrada, Eduardo
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
Trabajo presentado a la Conferencia Pathways Europe: "Human Dimensions of Wildlife: Resurrecting the Wild?", celebrada en Goslar (Alemania) del 16 al 19 de septiembre de 2018., Conflicts over the management of wildlife have notably increased during the last decades, and constitute an important risk for wildlife species conservation. The human dimension of such conflicts has received little attention by researchers to date, although it is increasingly acknowledged that understanding stakeholders¿ views and attitudes is essential to mitigate such conflicts. In Spain, the management of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is usually conflictive as this native lagomorph plays several different, contrasting roles. On one hand, European rabbits are one of the main small game species; ~6 million rabbits are hunted annually. On the other hand, they are a multifunctional keystone species, acting as ecosystem engineer and serving as prey for 40 predator species, including some of conservation concern. In addition, rabbits cause intensive crop damage in some farmland areas. In this context, the interests of stakeholders involved in the management of rabbit populations are often opposite. For instance, farmers generally aim to eradicate rabbits to reduce crop damage, while hunters intend to boost rabbit numbers to increase game availability. In this study, our main aim was to assess the attitudes of different stakeholders towards the management of European rabbits in Spanish farmland areas. To achieve this goal, we conducted personal in depth interviews with farmers (n=6), hunters (n=6) and people from governmental agencies responsible for environmental and farming management (n=11) in two distant study areas (south and north-eastern Spain), in which notable rabbit damage to crops had been reported. Beside this, 3 focus groups with hunters and 3 with farmers were conducted in the study areas. Interviews and focus groups were digitally recorded and transcribed into text material. Data analysis consisted of reading and re-reading text material to identify main themes, ideas and topics. According to our results, most participants agreed that in the past there were tensions between stakeholders about crop damage caused by rabbits. Most of them perceived that this conflict has been reduced recently, mainly as a consequence of the decline in rabbit numbers (and therefore crop damage) caused by rabbit diseases. Nevertheless, it was often believed that the problem will come back again in the future, and therefore tensions were somehow latent. In general, clashes took place between farmers and hunters and the former and policy makers, depending on the study area. In addition, there were many references along the interviews and focus groups to the perceived inefficacy of the current management system, which is based on hunting, to control rabbits and their damage. The qualitative thematic approach used in this study is very useful to describe stakeholders' attitude towards wildlife. Overall, our findings suggest that it is essential bringing all the stakeholders together to find solutions for rabbit damage that are acceptable to all parties. In this sense, new approaches to manage rabbit damage should be explored, and ideally this should be done with the participation of all involved stakeholders., M. Delibes-Mateos was supported by V Plan Propio de Investigación of the University os Seville. This is a contribution to the research project CGL2013-43197-R, and a collaborative project between WWF and CSIC., Peer Reviewed




Percepciones sobre el conejo y su gestión en áreas de daños

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Pérez de Ayala, Ramón
  • Garrido, Fernando
  • Castro, Francisca
  • Arroyo, Beatriz
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
El conejo de monte, común o europeo (Oryctolagus cuniculus) es uno de los mamíferos ibéricos con mayor importancia ecológica y económica, siendo, a la vez, presa para numerosos depredadores y una de las especies cinegéticas más apreciada por los amantes de la caza chica., Trabajo fruto de una colaboración entre un proyecto de WWF -con apoyo de la Fundaciób Biodiversidad- y el proyecto de investigación Ecología, sociedad y gestión de fauna: el conejo en la Peninsula Ibérica (CGL2013-43197-R)., Peer Reviewed




European rabbit hunting: Management changes and inertia in the governance system in a period of population fluctuations

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Piorno, Vicente
  • Arroyo, Beatriz
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Castro, Francisca
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
The recreational use of natural resources requires the implementation of sustainable management systems. However, the existence of socioeconomic interests and the difficulty involved in applying evidence-based criteria often hinder this implementation. The European wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is an appropriate case with which to study the recreational hunting governance systems. This species has, in recent decades, undergone important population changes in its native area, the Iberian Peninsula, where it plays a triple role as a game, pest and key ecological species. The rabbit is consequently intensively managed for hunting purposes, for the conservation of rabbit-dependent predators and in order to mitigate damage to crops. In this paper, we study the governance system of rabbit hunting through the use of questionnaire surveys distributed to managers working for Spanish regional governments. We repeated the survey in 2001 and 2016 in order to evaluate how the system had evolved over a 15-year period of important changes in rabbit population abundance. We found two different responses to these changes. The growth of rabbit populations in provinces in which rabbits cause crop damage in farmland areas has been dealt with an increase in hunting pressure, derived from both administrative decisions and hunters’ management. However, in provinces where rabbit populations have sharply declined in natural vegetation (non-farmland) areas, the management seems to be driven mostly by inertia, with a high influence of tradition and little use of evidence on administrative decisions. Hunters in these provinces have changed their management practices to little or no extent, where even the high importance of rabbit hunting and its (moderate) economic importance do not appear to provide an incentive for the change required., This study is a contribution of the CGL2013-43197-R project (I + D National Plan), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation.




La gestión del conejo en zonas de daños a la agricultura. Aspectos sociales

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Arroyo, Beatriz
  • Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge
  • Garrido Fernández, Fernando E.
  • Redpath, Steve M.
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, PO Box 1866, Mountain View, CA 94042, USA., [EN] In Spanish farmland areas, the European rabbit can cause considerable crop damage. Tensions typically emerge between farmers who advocate rabbit reduction and hunters who wish healthy rabbit populations for shooting. In this study, we used in-depth interviews and small group discussions with farmers, hunters and representatives of the governmental environmental agencies to assess their positions in this conflict. Our results showed that this conflict is characterised by tensions between and within groups, and influenced by leadership, distrust and past decision-making issues, and differences in beliefs among groups. Positions of farmers and hunters are also relatively rigid, which may make difficult their engagement in collaborative processes. To be effective, such processes need that local leaders are empowered and likely also that external neutral mediators are involved., Our research was conducted in two study areas: Campiña Sur de Córdoba (CSC) in Andalusia, southern Spain, and Alt Camp de Tarragona (ACT) in Catalunya, northern Spain. CSC and ACT comprise 11 and 23 municipalities, respectively, the former being larger than the latter (1100 km2 vs. 538 Km2) and including more inhabitants (105,000 vs. 44,000 inhabitants). These areas were selected due to similarities in the global context regarding rabbit damage to crops. The presence of vineyards is notable in both areas and there is significant rabbit damage to vineyards in both., In this study, we used qualitative techniques to understand perspective and views of the main stakeholders involved: farmers, hunters, and people working for governmental agencies in charge of wildlife management. Participants were selected using contact information provided by key informants in both study areas (snow-ball sampling). The total number of participants was 55. We used personal interviews to gather the opinion of key informants; i.e. managers in relevant farming associations, game managers and people working for environmental agencies. To assess the opinion of “regular” hunters and farmers, we used small discussion groups with three or four participants. To avoid the risk that an “opinion leader” may dominate the conversation in a discussion group, the moderator managed this potential limitation through promoting the participation of the most reticent people., Interviews and small discussion groups were conducted between 15th October and 16th December 2015. We stopped data collection when we observed that no new key themes emerged with further data. Both the interviews and the small discussion groups were conducted in such a way that a space was created for the open expression of the positions and criteria of the interviewees, that is, in a non-directive and conversational manner. The interviews and small discussion groups were conducted following a script of issues to be addressed, but it was adapted to the characteristics of the participants and the own development of the interviews and discussion groups. The script addressed participants’ perceptions about rabbit populations and rabbit damage to crops both in the recent past and when the survey was done and their perceptions and opinions about rabbit management conducted in the study area. In addition, it also dealt with the relationships between stakeholders involved in the problems caused by rabbit damage to crops as well as with participants’ attitudes towards other collectives or groups. Participants were guaranteed the mutual confidentiality and anonymity of the opinions expressed. Their express consent was obtained for participation in this study, which was done in compliance with both the Spanish and European legislations in terms of data privacy (Spanish Organic Law 3/2018; European Regulation 2016/679). Interview duration ranged between 15 and 120 minutes, while groups ranged between 45 and 150 minutes. Both were digitally recorded and transcribed. Data from interviews and small groups were analyzed jointly since both addressed the same key issues and had the same informative and opinion nature. Data analysis consisted of reading iteratively each text to identify main ideas and topics, pursuing an understanding and sociological interpretation of the data, checking interpretations among co-authors to create added awareness of certain dimensions in the data, and thus to identify properly the main themes., In order to ensure full protection of participants’ privacy and compliance with Spanish law of data protection (i.e. Royal Decree-Law 5/2018, of July 27th, on urgent measures for adaptation of Spanish Law to European Union regulations on data privacy), raw data is not made publicly available. Instead, a summary of raw data is shown and the information is anonymized and those parts that could give rise to the recognition of any of the participants have been eliminated, thus respecting confidentiality, [ES] En las zonas agrícolas españolas, el conejo europeo puede causar daños considerables a los cultivos. Las tensiones suelen surgir entre los agricultores, que abogan por la reducción de la población de conejos, y los cazadores, que desean disponer de un número elevado de conejos para cazar. En este estudio utilizamos entrevistas en profundidad y grupos de discusión reducidos con agricultores, cazadores y representantes de la administración ambiental y agrícola para evaluar sus posiciones en este conflicto. Nuestros resultados muestran que este conflicto se caracteriza por tensiones tanto inter como intragrupales, y está influenciado por el liderazgo, la desconfianza y los problemas de toma de decisiones pasadas, y las diferencias de creencias entre los distintos colectivos. Los posicionamientos de los agricultores y cazadores también son relativamente rígidos, lo que puede dificultar su participación en procesos de colaboración. Para ser efectivos, tales procesos necesitan que los líderes locales estén empoderados y probablemente también que participen mediadores externos neutrales., Nuestra investigación se llevó a cabo en dos áreas de estudio: Campiña Sur de Córdoba (CSC) en Andalucía, sur de España, y Alt Camp de Tarragona (ACT) en Catalunya, norte de España. CSC y ACT comprenden 11 y 23 municipios, respectivamente, siendo el primero más grande que el segundo (1100 km2 frente a 538 km2) e incluyendo más habitantes (105.000 frente a 44.000 habitantes). Estas áreas fueron seleccionadas debido a similitudes en el contexto global con respecto al daño de los conejos a los cultivos. La presencia de viñedos es notable en ambas zonas y existe igualmente un importante daño por conejos en los viñedos en ambas comarcas., En este estudio, utilizamos técnicas cualitativas para comprender la perspectiva y los puntos de vista de los principales actores involucrados: agricultores, cazadores y personas que trabajan en la administración vinculadas a la gestión de la vida silvestre. Los participantes fueron seleccionados utilizando la información de contacto proporcionada por informantes clave en ambas áreas de estudio (muestreo de bola de nieve). El número total de participantes fue de 55. Utilizamos entrevistas personales para recabar la opinión de informantes clave; es decir, representantes de organizaciones agrarias relevantes, gerentes de cotos de caza y personas que trabajan en la administración. Para evaluar la opinión de los cazadores y agricultores, utilizamos pequeños grupos de discusión con tres o cuatro participantes. Para evitar el riesgo de que un “líder de opinión” pueda dominar la conversación en un grupo de discusión, el moderador manejó esta potencial limitación promoviendo la participación de las personas más reticentes., El conjunto de entrevistas y grupos de discusión se desarrolló entre el 15 de octubre y el 16 de diciembre de 2015. La recopilación de datos se detuvo cuando observamos que no surgían nuevos temas clave o relevantes para el objeto de estudio. Tanto las entrevistas como los pequeños grupos de discusión se realizaron de tal manera que se creó un espacio para la expresión abierta de las posiciones y criterios de los entrevistados, es decir, de manera no directiva y conversacional. Las entrevistas y los pequeños grupos de discusión se realizaron siguiendo un guion de temas a tratar, pero se adaptó a las características de los participantes y al propio desarrollo de las entrevistas y grupos. El guion abordó las percepciones de los participantes sobre las poblaciones de conejos y el daño producido a los cultivos, tanto en el pasado reciente como cuando se realizó la encuesta, y sus percepciones y opiniones sobre el manejo de conejos realizado en las áreas de estudio. Además, también se trataron las relaciones entre los colectivos involucrados en los problemas causados por el daño de los conejos a los cultivos, así como las actitudes de los participantes hacia otros grupos. Se garantizó a los participantes la confidencialidad y el anonimato de las opiniones expresadas. Se obtuvo su consentimiento expreso para participar en este estudio, el cual se realizó en cumplimiento de la legislación tanto española como europea en materia de privacidad de datos (Ley Orgánica 3/2018; Reglamento Europeo 2016/679). La duración de las entrevistas osciló entre los 15 y los 120 minutos, mientras que los grupos variaron entre 45 y 150 minutos. Ambos fueron grabados y transcritos digitalmente. Los datos de las entrevistas y grupos se analizaron de forma conjunta, ya que ambos abordaron los mismos temas clave y tenían el mismo carácter informativo y de opinión. El análisis de datos consistió en la lectura iterativa de cada texto para identificar las ideas y temas principales, buscando una comprensión e interpretación sociológica de los datos, verificando las interpretaciones entre los coautores para crear una mayor conciencia de ciertas dimensiones en los datos y así identificar adecuadamente los temas principales., Con el fin de garantizar la plena protección de la privacidad de los participantes y el cumplimiento de la ley española de protección de datos (es decir, el Real Decreto-ley 5/2018, de 27 de julio, de medidas urgentes para la adaptación de la legislación española a la normativa de la Unión Europea sobre privacidad de datos), los datos brutos no se ponen a disposición del público. En cambio, se muestra un resumen de los datos brutos y se anonimiza la información y se eliminan aquellas partes que pudieran dar lugar al reconocimiento de alguno de los participantes, respetando así la confidencialidad., We acknowledge financial support from the Spanish Science Ministry (MINECO) through project CGL2013-43197-R; and from Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC) through PII-201810I026., La información contenida en el fichero de datos se estructura de la siguiente forma:
Comarca Alt Camp (Tarragona)
-Entrevistas y grupos de discusión cazadores, agricultores y administración
Comarca Campiña Sur (Córdoba)
-Entrevistas y grupos de discusión cazadores, agricultores y administración, Con objeto de asegurar la completa protección de la privacidad de los participantes en las entrevistas y cumplir con la legislación española de protección de datos (p.ej. RD 5/2018, de27 de julio, sobre medidas urgentes de adaptación de la legislación española a la regulación de la UE sobre la privacidad de datos), los datos brutos de las entrevistas no se ponen a disposición del público. En su lugar, se muestra un resumen de los datos brutos, se anonimiza la información y se eliminan aquellas partes que pudieran dar lugar al reconocimiento de alguno de los participantes, respetando así la confidencialidad., No




Conflicto y cooperación: percepción de los actores implicados sobre los daños de conejo y su gestión. Implicaciones para mecanismos coordinados de gestión

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Delibes-Mateos, Miguel
  • Arroyo, Beatriz
  • Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge
  • Garrido, Fernando
  • Villafuerte, Rafael
Jornadas de Trabajo: "El papel de la caza en la gestión de la sobreabundancia de especies cinegéticas” , Ciudad Real, 16-18 de noviembre de 2020., Con frecuencia algunas especies de fauna silvestre impactan negativamente sobre los intereses y bienestar de las personas, llegando incluso en ocasiones a poner en riesgo su seguridad (Woodroffe et al. 2005). Dichos impactos negativos suelen ser conocidos como “daños” de fauna que, por tanto, pueden definirse como cualquier cosa que hace la fauna que no gusta a las personas. Los daños de fauna se han producido desde tiempos inmemoriales, existiendo abundantes textos históricos en los que se describen., Agradecemos especialmente a todos los participantes en el estudio titulado “La gestión del conejo en zonas de daños a la agricultura: aspectos sociales”. Este artículo contribuye a los proyectos CGL2013-43197-R y RTI2018-096348-R-C21/C22 (MCI/AEI/FEDER, UE)., Peer reviewed