LA TRANSFERENCIA DE INFORMACION COMO MECANISMO DE FACILITACION EN COMUNIDADES ANIMALES

CGL2017-85191-P

Nombre agencia financiadora Agencia Estatal de Investigación
Acrónimo agencia financiadora AEI
Programa Programa Estatal de Fomento de la Investigación Científica y Técnica de Excelencia
Subprograma Subprograma Estatal de Generación de Conocimiento
Convocatoria Proyectos I+D
Año convocatoria 2017
Unidad de gestión Plan Estatal de Investigación Científica y Técnica y de Innovación 2013-2016
Centro beneficiario AGENCIA ESTATAL CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENTIFICAS (CSIC)
Identificador persistente http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100011033

Publicaciones

Found(s) 10 result(s)
Found(s) 1 page(s)

The roles of geography, climate and sexual selection in driving divergence among insect populations on mountaintops

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Pato Fernández, Joaquina
  • Illera Cobo, Juan Carlos
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
  • Laiolo, Paola
Aim
Analysing the drivers of intraspecific variation and how reproductive barriers arise is an essential step to infer the mechanisms of biogeographic differentiation. In populations of a specialized alpine species, we explore the role of geography and climate in the divergence of genetic, morphological and acoustic characters, and analyse the functional consequences of variation on mate choice.

Taxon
Chorthippus cazurroi (Orthoptera: Caelifera, Acrididae, Gomphocerinae).

Location
The entire distribution of the species (23 populations from six massifs of the Cantabrian Mountains, NW Spain).

Methods
First, we analysed the extent of intraspecific spatial divergence and the covariation among climatic niche, genetic (mtDNA), acoustic (song structure) and morphological (body size) traits. Then, we analysed the consequences of phenotypic variation by means of a crossing experiment among populations from different elevations. This served to test for differences in sexual selection among body size‐divergent populations and for the relationship between male traits, female preference and reproduction.

Results
Genetic, morphologic and acoustic divergence increased with geographic distance. Female morphology was also affected by climate variation, while male one tightly covaried with the song differentiation. Females more closely approached males investing more time in song activities, but weakly responded to the rest of acoustic features and morphological variation. They also distanced themselves slightly more from males from different populations, although this behaviour did not lead to clear differences in reproductive parameters.

Main conclusions
The process of colonization of mountain massifs has led to significant genetic and phenotypic changes in C. cazurroi. Phenotypic divergence does not constitute a strong intrinsic barrier to reproduction and is largely unpaired from female preference, overall suggesting that sexual selection is a minor actor in the process of differentiation as compared, for instance, to drift. This does not exclude that traits associated with individual condition are under strong selection and, therefore, do not vary so extensively. This study dismisses the idea that alpine specialists with narrow distributions lack genetic and phenotypic variability, and highlights the importance of synthesizing biogeographic and experimental approaches to obtain stronger and deeper inferences about the dynamics and mechanisms of biological differentiation., Funding for this study was provided by grant 4278 of the British Ecological Society, grants CGL2011‐28177, CGL2014‐53899‐P and CGL2017‐85191‐P from the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness, and grant LIQUENES 2014 from FICYT and edp‐HC Energía., Peer reviewed




Gradual Distance Dispersal Shapes the Genetic Structure in an Alpine Grasshopper

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Illera, Juan Carlos
  • Arenas, Miguel
  • López-Sánchez, Carlos A.
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
  • Laiolo, Paola
The location of the high mountains of southern Europe has been crucial in the phylogeography of most European species, but how extrinsic (topography of sky islands) and intrinsic features (dispersal dynamics) have interacted to shape the genetic structure in alpine restricted species is still poorly known. Here we investigated the mechanisms explaining the colonisation of Cantabrian sky islands in an endemic flightless grasshopper. We scrutinised the maternal genetic variability and haplotype structure, and we evaluated the fitting of two migration models to understand the extant genetic structure in these populations: Long-distance dispersal (LDD) and gradual distance dispersal (GDD). We found that GDD fits the real data better than the LDD model, with an onset of the expansion matching postglacial expansions after the retreat of the ice sheets. Our findings suggest a scenario with small carrying capacity, migration rates, and population growth rates, being compatible with a slow dispersal process. The gradual expansion process along the Cantabrian sky islands found here seems to be conditioned by the suitability of habitats and the presence of alpine corridors. Our findings shed light on our understanding about how organisms which have adapted to live in alpine habitats with limited dispersal abilities have faced new and suitable environmental conditions., This study was funded by grant 4278 of the British Ecological Society, grants CGL2011-28177, CGL2014-53899-P, CGL2017-85191-P, and RYC-2015-18241 from the Spanish Ministry of Science, grant LIQUENES 2014 (CN-13-058) from FICYT and edp-HC Energía, and a GRUPIN research grant from the Regional Government of Asturias (Ref.: IDI/2018/000151)., Peer reviewed




Survey & Traits Datasets

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Laiolo, Paola
  • Pato Fernández, Joaquina
  • Jiménez Alfaro, Borja
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
We compiled datasets using own data and literature data of surveys carried out in the Cantabrian Mountains, NW Spain, and a dataset of functional traits of the species of surveys. In Survey Datasets, data are presented as Site (Row) x Species (Column) matrices in which 1 indicate presence and 0 absence of a given species in a given site; habitat and geographic information are provided in additional columns. In Trait Datasets, data are presented as Species (Row) x Trait (Column) matrices., No




Evolutionary conservation of within-family biodiversity patterns

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Laiolo, Paola
  • Pato Fernández, Joaquina
  • Jiménez Alfaro, Borja
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
The raw data set has been deposited in the Digital CSIC repository (https://doi.org/
10.20350/digitalCSIC/10529), The tendency for species to retain their ancestral biological properties has been widely demonstrated, but the effect of phylogenetic constraints when progressing from species to ensemble-level properties requires further assessment. Here we test whether community-level patterns (environmental shifts in local species richness and turnover) are phylogenetically conserved, assessing whether their similarity across different families of lichens, insects, and birds is dictated by the relatedness of these families. We show a significant phylogenetic signal in the shape of the species richness-elevation curve and the decay of community similarity with elevation: closely related families share community patterns within the three major taxa. Phylogenetic influences are partly explained by similarities among families in conserved traits defining body plan and interactions, implying a scaling of phylogenetic effects from the organismal to the community level. Consequently, the phylogenetic signal in community-level patterns informs about how the historical legacy of a taxon and shared responses among related taxa to similar environments contribute to community assembly and diversity patterns., This work was funded by grants CGL2014-53899-P/AEI/FEDER.UE and CGL2017-85191-P/AEI/FEDER.UE of the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities, and grant IDI/2018/000151 of Principado de Asturias, Peer reviewed




Selection for functional performance in the evolution of cuticle hardening mechanisms in insects

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Laiolo, Paola
  • Pato Fernández, Joaquina
  • Illera Cobo, Juan Carlos
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
Calcified tissues have repeatedly evolved in many animal lineages and show a tremendous diversity of forms and functions. The cuticle of many insects is enriched with elements other than Calcium, a strategy of hardening that is taxonomically widespread but apparently poorly variable among clades. Here, we investigate the evolutionary potential of the enrichment with metals in insect cuticle at different biological levels. We combined experimental evidence of Zinc content variation in the mandibles of a target species (Chorthippus cazurroi [Bolívar]) with phylogenetic comparative analyses among grasshopper species. We found that mandibular Zinc content was repeatable among related individuals and was associated with an indicator of fitness, so there was potential for adaptive variation. Among species, Zinc enrichment evolved as a consequence of environmental and dietary influences on the physical function of the jaw (cutting and chewing), suggesting a role of natural selection in environmental fit. However, there were also important within and transgenerational environmental sources of similarity among individuals. These environmental influences, along with the tight relationship with biomechanics, may limit the potential for diversification of this hardening mechanism. This work provides novel insights into the diversification of biological structures and the link between evolutionary capacity and intra- and interspecific variation., We were supported by grants 4278 of the British Ecological Society, CGL2017-85191-P/AEI/FEDER.UE from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, LIQUENES from FICYT and EDP-HC Energía, and IDI/2018/000151 from Principado de Asturias., Peer reviewed




Cambio climático y variación de los ciclos vitales con la altitud

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
  • Laiolo, Paola
[ES] El cambio climático es un factor clave de pérdida de diversidad, está modificando el área de distribución de las especies y sus interacciones, y también los rasgos de sus ciclos vitales. En este trabajo se sintetiza la información disponible sobre las modificaciones de los ciclos vitales conocidas o previstas considerando los efectos de los gradientes de altitud en los sistemas montañosos. Se enmarca en la hipótesis del continuo rápido-lento y considera como variables clave la edad de la primera reproducción, la inversión en reproducción y la duración del ciclo. Se ha documentado, con carácter general, que especies de diferentes grupos taxonómicos tienen ciclos vitales más rápidos a menor altitud (mayores temperaturas). Contrariamente, en las zonas de mayor altitud el tiempo hasta la maduración se alarga, la inversión en la reproducción es proporcionalmente menor y la esperanza de vida y longevidad aumentan. Se documentan en esta revisión algunos ejemplos en los que los ciclos vitales varían con la altitud y estas variaciones se deben, con frecuencia, a adaptaciones locales. Además, se presenta un caso de estudio en el que las especies de aves que conforman una comunidad tienden a converger a lo largo de un gradiente de altitud hacia ciclos vitales más lentos a mayor altitud. Tanto en el caso intraespecífico, como en el interespecífico, es previsible que el cambio climático esté modificando las características de los ciclos vitales acelerándolos de acuerdo con la actual situación a menores altitudes., [EN] Climate change is modifying many ecological patterns and processes, from the distribution of species to their interactions and life histories. Here, we synthetize the available information on climate-driven modification of life histories, which also includes the elevational clines of these features. The slow-fast continuum of life histories (from slow development and reproduction to fast and short lives) provides the framework on which intra and interspecific variation is generated, with key variables being the age of the first reproduction, reproductive investment and lifespan. Species, and often also populations of species, tend to have faster life cycles at lower altitudes (where temperatures are warmer), shortening the maturation time, investing proportionally more time and resources in reproduction, and living shorter lives. Local adaptations are often the underlying mechanisms of these changes, and broad convergence in lifestyles can be observed among co-occurring species in mountain communities. We expect that climate change will modify, accelerating, the life histories of organisms, in keeping with the elevational shifts of climatic and environmental conditions., Buena parte de este trabajo es el resultado del desarrollo de los proyectos CGL2014-53899-P/AEI/FEDER.UE y CGL2017-85191-P/AEI/FEDER.UE del Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación y Universidades




Dataset of Cantabrian Mountains insects, Stuck on top of a mountain: consequences of dispersal limitations for alpine diversity. Dataset

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Laiolo, Paola
  • Illera, Juan Carlos
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (CGL2017-85191-P/AEI/FEDER.UE, PID2020-115259GB-I00 by MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033) and Principado de Asturias (IDI/2021/000075), Peer reviewed




Data from: Selection for functional performance in the evolution of cuticle hardening mechanisms in insects

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Laiolo, Paola
  • Pato Fernández, Joaquina
  • Illera Cobo, Juan Carlos
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
[Methods] We measured Zinc content and strengths of grasshopper mandibles, by means of scanning electron microscope and calibrated multifocus pictures. We used biological and ecological information obtained from field and experimental data on the grasshopper species inhabiting the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain).
[Usage Notes] The different datasets of the study can be found in separate sheets. An informative title on sheet content has been given to each sheet. In tables, column names refer to the variable measured (and the unit of measurement)., Calcified tissues have repeatedly evolved in many animal lineages and show a tremendous diversity of forms and functions. The cuticle of many insects is enriched with elements other than Calcium, a strategy of hardening that is taxonomically widespread but apparently poorly variable among clades. Here, we investigate the evolutionary potential of the enrichment with metals in insect cuticle at different biological levels. We combined experimental evidence of Zinc content variation in the mandibles of a target species (Chorthippus cazurroi) with phylogenetic comparative analyses among grasshopper species. We found that mandibular Zinc content was repeatable among related individuals and was associated with an indicator of fitness, so there was potential for adaptive variation. Among species, Zinc enrichment evolved as a consequence of environmental and dietary influences on the physical function of the jaw (cutting and chewing), suggesting a role of natural selection in environmental fit. However, there were also important within and transgenerational environmental sources of similarity among individuals. These environmental influences, along with the tight relationship with biomechanics, may limit the potential for diversification of this hardening mechanism. This work provides novel insights into the diversification of biological structures and the link between evolutionary capacity and intra and interspecific variation., Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Award: CGL2017-85191-P/AEI/FEDER.UE.
Gobierno del Principado de Asturias, Award: IDI/2018/000151. British Ecological Society, Award: 4278.
FYCIT Asturias., Peer reviewed




Stuck on top of a mountain: Consequences of dispersal limitations for alpine diversity

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Laiolo, Paola
  • Illera, Juan Carlos
  • Obeso Suárez, José Ramón
[Aim] The future of biodiversity in increasingly warmer mountains may be poorly predicted by climate variation if dispersal affects ecological change. We assessed the influence of dispersal limitations in the assembly of mountaintop communities, focusing on the relationship between proxies of flight abilities and species diversity in insects., [Location] Cantabrian Mountains, Spain., [Taxon] Grasshoppers (Orthoptera, Acrididae) and bumblebees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Bombinae)., [Methods] We analysed the magnitude of variation in the relative wing length of individuals, species and communities along elevation by means of phylogenetic multilevel and generalized least square models, to assess the environmental fit of this morphological trait. Then we analysed whether wing length variation among assemblages affected species diversity and the biotic interchange between foothills and mountaintops, and between nearby mountaintops, by means of linear models and metrics quantifying dispersal., [Results] Grasshoppers and bumblebees converged in the evolution of shorter wings at higher elevations. The effects of this adaptation scaled to the community level and affected diversity patterns. Mountaintop assemblages were richer (grasshoppers) or shared more species with lowlands (bumblebees) when the average wingspan of their member species was larger. The species composition of mountaintops was significantly affected by dispersal processes and their species richness was more strongly correlated with that of their foothills than that of nearby mountains., [Main Conclusions] These results show a wingspan reduction in upland insects, the role of dispersal in improving species richness and reducing beta diversity, and the dependence of mountaintop diversity from the species pools of foothills. In these settings, we can envisage that upward movements of long-winged species will be favoured and increase the species richness and nestedness of upland biotas as climate warms. However, the fate of upland inhabitants will depend on how they tackle novel biotic and abiotic pressures, given the constraints to peak-to-peak displacement., We were supported by grants CGL2017-85191-P/AEI/FEDER.UE, PID2020-115259GB-I00 by MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033 and IDI/2021/000075., Peer reviewed




Gradual distance dispersal shapes the genetic structure in an alpine grasshopper

Investigo. Repositorio Institucional de la Universidade de Vigo
  • Illera, Juan Carlos
  • Arenas Busto, Miguel
  • López Sánchez, Carlos A.
  • Obeso, José Ramón
  • Laiolo, Paola
The location of the high mountains of southern Europe has been crucial in the phylogeography of most European species, but how extrinsic (topography of sky islands) and intrinsic features (dispersal dynamics) have interacted to shape the genetic structure in alpine restricted species is still poorly known. Here we investigated the mechanisms explaining the colonisation of Cantabrian sky islands in an endemic flightless grasshopper. We scrutinised the maternal genetic variability and haplotype structure, and we evaluated the fitting of two migration models to understand the extant genetic structure in these populations: Long-distance dispersal (LDD) and gradual distance dispersal (GDD). We found that GDD fits the real data better than the LDD model, with an onset of the expansion matching postglacial expansions after the retreat of the ice sheets. Our findings suggest a scenario with small carrying capacity, migration rates, and population growth rates, being compatible with a slow dispersal process. The gradual expansion process along the Cantabrian sky islands found here seems to be conditioned by the suitability of habitats and the presence of alpine corridors. Our findings shed light on our understanding about how organisms which have adapted to live in alpine habitats with limited dispersal abilities have faced new and suitable environmental conditions., British Ecological Society | Ref. 4278, Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad | Ref. CGL2014-53899-P, Agencia Estatal de Investigación | Ref. CGL2017-85191-P, Agencia Estatal de Investigación | Ref. RYC-2015-18241, Gobierno del Principado de Asturias | Ref. IDI/2018/000151, Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad | Ref. CGL2011-28177