ESCALANDO LOS EFECTOS DE LAS DINAMICAS DE NICHO E INTERACCIONES EN LAS CONSECUENCIAS ECOLOGICAS Y EVOLUTIVAS DE LA COEXISTENCIA

PID2019-106840GB-C21

Nombre agencia financiadora Agencia Estatal de Investigación
Acrónimo agencia financiadora AEI
Programa Programa Estatal de Generación de Conocimiento y Fortalecimiento Científico y Tecnológico del Sistema de I+D+i
Subprograma Subprograma Estatal de Generación de Conocimiento
Convocatoria Proyectos I+D
Año convocatoria 2019
Unidad de gestión Plan Estatal de Investigación Científica y Técnica y de Innovación 2017-2020
Centro beneficiario AGENCIA ESTATAL CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENTIFICAS (CSIC)
Identificador persistente http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100011033

Publicaciones

Found(s) 11 result(s)
Found(s) 2 page(s)

A database of Neotropical dung beetle local richness from standardized inventories

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Pessôa, Marcelo Bruno
  • Alves-Martins, Fernanda
  • De Marco Jr, Paulo
  • Hortal, Joaquín
This work provides open access to the data compiled for the following paper Marcelo Bruno Pessôa, Fernanda Alves-Martins, Paulo De Marco Junior and Joaquín Hortal. Unveiling the drivers of local dung beetle species richness in the Neotropics, Journal of Biogeography 2021. See the original paper for more details., This database is based on a survey of published literature on dung beetle communities to extract information on species richness, abundance, type of bait, type of habitat, and sampling effort (as hours/pitfall) for different localities, discarding sites with low sampling effort. We used environmental variables to account for six possible explanations of species richness gradients: productivity, water–energy, ambient energy, habitat heterogeneity, resource heterogeneity, and seasonality, as well as spatial data to account for other geographically-structured phenomena. In total the database contains data for 300 localities., This work was supported by the projects ‘Predicting diversity variations across scales through process-based models linking community ecology and biogeography’ (CNPq PVE 314523/2014-6), and SCENIC - ‘Scaling the effects of niche and interaction dynamics on the ecological and evolutionary outcomes of coexistence’ (PID2019-106840GB-C21, funded by AEI/FEDER, UE). MBP was supported by CAPES grants PROEX-0487 and 88881.135489/2016-01, and FAM by CAPES Postdoctoral scholarship 120147/2016-01. PDMJ research is funded by CNPq (grant 308694/2015-5). This paper is a contribution of the INCT in Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity Conservation founded by MCTIC/CNPq/FAPEG (grant 465610/2014-5)., Contains: 1. Excel file with Data, Database Legend, Data Origin, and Consulted Literature., Peer reviewed




Unveiling the drivers of local dung beetle species richness in the Neotropics

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Pessôa, Marcelo Bruno
  • Alves-Martins, Fernanda
  • De Marco Jr, Paulo
  • Hortal, Joaquín
[Aim]: Nearly 40 different hypotheses have been put forward to explain the latitudinal diversity gradient, implying that geographical variations of biodiversity may be the result of a complex array of factors affecting organisms in different ways. Our main goal was to identify the most important drivers of local dung beetle species richness in the Neotropics., [Location]: Neotropics., [Taxon]: Dung Beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae)., [Methods]: We used a multi-model approach to identify which potential drivers correlate better with the variations in local dung beetle species richness. We surveyed published literature on dung beetle communities to extract information on species richness, abundance, type of bait, type of habitat and sampling effort (as hours/pitfall) for different localities, discarding sites with low sampling effort. We used environmental variables to account for six possible explanations of species richness gradients: productivity, water–energy, ambient energy, habitat heterogeneity, resource heterogeneity and seasonality, as well as spatial data to account for other geographically structured phenomena. We used mixed models—with abundance, ecoregion and bait type as random factors—to select the best model among the variables accounting for each explanation. Finally, we used structural equation models to assess which explanations are associated with variations in dung beetle diversity and how they interact., [Results]: Resource heterogeneity was the best single correlate of dung beetle richness. However, the best multiple model comprises three different explanations: productivity, resource heterogeneity and other spatially structured factors. Structural equation models show that abundance is directly (positively) associated with richness, followed by primary productivity and soil variables (a proxy for environmental heterogeneity), together with mammal richness, (a proxy for resource heterogeneity)., [Main conclusions]: Several explanations need to be considered to account for Scarabaeinae local richness patterns. The diversity of dung beetle communities correlates with the interaction of water–energy dynamics and heterogeneity in both resources and habitats. However, while heterogeneity variables are directly associated with richness, energy relates with it through abundance, and water through resource diversity., Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico, Grant/Award Number: 308694/2015-5 and 314523/2014-6; MCTIC/CNPq/FAPEG, Grant/Award Number: 465610/2014-5; Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior, Grant/Award Number: 120147/2016-01, 88881.135489/2016-01 and PROEX 0487; SCENIC–‘Scaling the effects of niche and interaction dynamics on the ecological and evolutionary outcomes of coexistence’, Grant/Award Number: PID2019-106840GB-C21, Peer reviewed




Aridity drives the loss of dung beetle taxonomic and functional diversity in three contrasting deserts

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Sánchez-Bermejo, Pablo Castro
  • deCastro-Arrazola, Indradatta
  • Cuesta Moreno, Eva María
  • Davis, Adrian L.V.
  • Moreno, Claudia E.
  • Sánchez-Piñeiro, Francisco
  • Hortal, Joaquín
[Aim]: Aridity gradients are of great interest for understanding the responses of biodi-versity to water availability and water stress. However, little is known about the re-sponses of many animal groups, which are crucial for assessing the effects of climate change. Here, we study the effects of aridity on dung beetle communities, a group with well- known responses to large-scale environmental gradients., [Location]: Sahara, Kalahari and Chihuahuan deserts.
[Taxa]: Dung beetles of the family Scarabaeidae., [Methods]: We conducted standardized surveys along approximately 400 km aridity gradients in each of the three deserts, and measured species richness, abundance, evenness and three aspects of trait- based functional diversity (functional richness, functional evenness and functional dispersion). By using randomization tests and linear mixed models, we compared observed with expected values for functional di-versity indices from null models that hierarchically incorporate additional assembly constraints., [Results]: Overall, we found a decrease of both taxonomic richness and functional dispersion along the three aridity gradients. Also, aridity seems to have mild effects on functional richness and functional evenness. Besides these general trends, we identi-fied differences between deserts in the responses of both taxonomic and functional diversity., [Main conclusions] Aridity shows greater importance than competition and other processes of limiting similarity or stochastic processes in community assembly. Also, the functional hypervolume of dung beetle desert communities decreases with aridity not only due to species loss, but also because of selection of a few distinct phenotypes under harsh environmental conditions. Last, we observed that the different regional pools respond to aridity in different ways. Therefore, understanding future responses of dung beetle communities to the progressive decreases in water availability driven by climate change requires determining how the characteristics of the species in the regional pool interact with aridity-driven assembly processes., PCS-B was supported by CSIC grant JAE INT20_EX_0337, and IdeC-A by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation FPI grant BES-2012-054353. This work is part of project SCENIC (grant PID2019-106840GB-C21 funded by MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033), and fieldwork was supported by project SCARPO (grant CGL2011-29317 funded by Spanish MINECO)., Peer reviewed




tempNorthBryo - mosses occurrences dataset from the temperate region of the north hemisphere

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Ronquillo, Cristina
  • Stropp Juliana
  • Hortal, Joaquín
[EN] Dataset of publicly available biodiversity information of mosses records from the temperate region of the Northern Hemisphere. It contains 9,195,062 occurrences result of the compilation, cleaning, enrichment and validation from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF 2021; phylum=Bryophyta), the Botanical Information and Ecology Network (BIEN), Consortium of North American Bryophyte Herbaria (CNABH) and the Integrated digitized biocollections (iDigBio). This database was created to assess and quantify how the application of different filters and taxonomic standardization databases affect the spatial patterns of species richness (Ronquillo et al, not published)., [ES] Conjunto de datos con los 9,195,062 registros disponibles públicamente de presencias de musgos en la región templada del hemisferio norte. Los datos contenidos han sido compilados, limpiados y validados a partir de los registros presentes en el portal de datos de biodiversidad 'Global Biodiversity Information Facility' (GBIF 2021; filo=Bryophyta), 'Botanical Information and Ecology Network' (BIEN), 'Consortium of North American Bryophyte Herbaria' (CNABH) y el portal 'Integrated digitized biocollections' (iDigBio). Esta base de datos fue creada con el objetivo de analizar si la aplicación de diferentes filtros de limpieza de datos y métodos de estandarización taxonómica afectan a la distribución geográfica de la riqueza de especies (Ronquillo et al, no publicado)., This work is part of the project SCENIC - Escalando los efectos de las dinámicas de nicho e interacciones en las consecuencias ecológicas y evolutivas de la coexistencia / Scaling the effects of niche and interaction dynamics on the ecological and evolutionary outcomes of coexistence [PID2019-106840GB-C21] (Proyecto coordinado)
Project SCENIC, grant PID2019-106840GB-C21 funded by MCIN/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033, No




UnitedSixSoilMoss - Six cosmopolite Mediterranean soil moss species global distribution dataset

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Ronquillo, Cristina
  • Molina-Bustamante, Manuel
  • Medina, Nagore G.
  • Hortal, Joaquín
Dataset of publicly available biodiversity information of mosses records of six different species.
The selected species are Tortella squarrosa (Brid.) Limpr., Dicranum scoparium Hedw., Syntrichia ruralis (Hedw.) F.Weber & D.Mohr, Ptychostomum capillare (Hedw.) D.T.Holyoak & N.Pedersen, Homalothecium aureum (Spruce) H.Rob. and Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw.
The dataset contains 322,595 occurrences result of the compilation, cleaning, enrichment and validation from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (see 'is.based.on' field to check download citations from GBIF).
This database was elaborated to develope species distribution models and make predictions of their future geographical distribution based on different climate change scenarios., This work was part of the project UNITED Unifying niches, interactions and distributions: A common theoretical framework for geographic range dynamics and local coexistence (CGL2016-78070-P, funded by AEI/FEDER, UE) and SCENIC - Escalando los efectos de las dinámicas de nicho e interacciones en las consecuencias ecológicas y evolutivas de la coexistencia / Scaling the effects of niche and interaction dynamics on the ecological and evolutionary outcomes of coexistence [PID2019-106840GB-C21] (Proyecto coordinado) Project SCENIC, grant PID2019-106840GB-C21 funded by MCIN/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033, No




A trait-based framework for dung beetle functional ecology

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • deCastro-Arrazola, Indradatta
  • Andrew, Nigel R.
  • Berg, Matty P.
  • Curtsdotter, Alva
  • Lumaret, Jean-Pierre
  • Menéndez, Rosa
  • Moretti, Marco
  • Nervo, Beatrice
  • Nichols, Elizabeth
  • Santos, Ana M. C.
  • Sheldon, Kimberly S.
  • Slade, Eleanor M.
  • Hortal, Joaquín
Traits are key for understanding the environmental responses and ecological roles of organisms. Trait approaches to functional ecology are well established for plants, whereas consistent frameworks for animal groups are less developed. Here we suggest a framework for the study of the functional ecology of animals from a trait-based response–effect approach, using dung beetles as model system. Dung beetles are a key group of decomposers that are important for many ecosystem processes. The lack of a trait-based framework tailored to this group has limited the use of traits in dung beetle functional ecology. We review which dung beetle traits respond to the environment and affect ecosystem processes, covering the wide range of spatial, temporal and biological scales at which they are involved. Dung beetles show trait-based responses to variation in temperature, water, soil properties, trophic resources, light, vegetation structure, competition, predation and parasitism. Dung beetles' influence on ecosystem processes includes trait-mediated effects on nutrient cycling, bioturbation, plant growth, seed dispersal, other dung-based organisms and parasite transmission, as well as some cases of pollination and predation. We identify 66 dung beetle traits that are either response or effect traits, or both, pertaining to six main categories: morphology, feeding, reproduction, physiology, activity and movement. Several traits pertain to more than one category, in particular dung relocation behaviour during nesting or feeding. We also identify 136 trait–response and 77 trait–effect relationships in dung beetles. No response to environmental stressors nor effect over ecological processes were related with traits of a single category. This highlights the interrelationship between the traits shaping body-plans, the multi-functionality of traits, and their role linking responses to the environment and effects on the ecosystem. Despite current developments in dung beetle functional ecology, many knowledge gaps remain, and there are biases towards certain traits, functions, taxonomic groups and regions. Our framework provides the foundations for the thorough development of trait-based dung beetle ecology. It also serves as an example framework for other taxa., Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, FPI grant BES2012-054353, Ramón y Cajal Fellowship (RYC2020-029407-I). Spanish Agencia Estatal de Investigación Projects CGL2011-29317, PID2019-106840GB-C21/AEI/10.13039/501100011033., Peer reviewed




Moss establishment success is determined by the interaction between propagule size and species identity

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Hurtado, Fernando
  • Estébenez, Belén
  • Aragón Carrera, Pedro
  • Hortal, Joaquín
  • Molina Bustamante, Manuel
  • Medina, Nagore G.
Colonization of new habitat patches is a key aspect of metacommunity dynamics, particularly for sessile organisms. Mosses can establish in new patches through fragmentation, with different vegetative structures acting as propagules. Despite the importance of these propagules for successful colonization the specific aspects that favour moss colonization by vegetative propagules remain poorly understood, including the effect of propagule size. We examine the intra- and interspecific variation of establishment and colonization success in culture of propagules of different sizes in six widespread soil moss species of contrasting growth form (Dicranum scoparium, Homalothecium aureum, Hypnum cupressiforme, Ptychostomum capillare, Syntrichia ruralis and Tortella squarrosa). We obtained three different size classes of propagules from artificially fragmented vegetative material, and assessed their establishment under controlled light and temperature conditions. We characterize the size, shape, apparent viability, morphological type and size changes due to hydration states of the propagules, all of them traits with potentially significant influence in their dispersal pattern and establishment. Then we assess the effect of these traits on moss establishment, using indicators of surface establishment (number of established shoots and colonized surface) and biomass production (viable biomass) as proxies of colonization success. The establishment indicators related to colonization surface and biomass production differ among species and propagule sizes. The magnitude of the interspecific differences of all indicators of establishment success was larger at the smaller propagule size class. T. squarrosa was the most successful species, and D. scoparium showed the lowest performance. We also found interspecific differences in the hydration dynamics of the propagules. The process of establishment by vegetative fragments operates differently among moss species. Besides, differences between hydration states in propagules of some species could be part of syndromes for both dispersal and establishment. This study unveils several functional traits relevant for moss colonization, such as wet versus dry area and length of fragments, which may improve our understanding of their spatial dynamics., FH: Predoctoral FPI (fellowship BES-2017-081645, funded by Spanish MICIN). Projects UNITED (Grant CGL2016-78070-P funded by Spanish Agencia Estatal de Investigación/Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional, UE) and SCENIC (Grants PID2019-106840GB-C21 and PID2019-106840GA-C22) funded by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación/Agencia Estatal de Investigación, MCIN/AEI/ https://doi.org/10.13039/501100011033., Peer reviewed




Geographical shifts in the successional dynamics of inland dune shrub communities

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Chozas, Sergio
  • Chefaoui, Rosa M.
  • Correia, Otília
  • Santos, Ana M. C.
  • Hortal, Joaquín
Species' environmental requirements and large-scale spatial and evolutionary processes determine the structure and composition of local communities. However, ecological interactions also have major effects on community assembly at landscape and local scales. We evaluate whether two xerophytic shrub communities occurring in SW Portugal follow constrained ecological assembly dynamics throughout large geographical extents, or their composition is rather driven by species’ individualistic responses to environmental and macroecological constraints. Inland dune xerophytic shrub communities were characterized in 95 plots. Then, we described the main gradients of vegetation composition and assessed the relevance of biotic interactions. We also characterized the habitat suitability of the dominant species, Stauracanthus genistoides, and Ulex australis, to map the potential distribution of the xerophytic shrub communities. Finally, we examined the relationships between the vegetation gradients and a broad set of explanatory variables to identify the relative importance of each factor driving changes in community composition. We found that xerophytic shrubs follow uniform successional patterns throughout the whole geographical area studied, but each community responds differently to the main environmental gradients in each region. Soil organic matter is the main determinant of community variations in the northern region, Setúbal Peninsula, whereas aridity is so in the South/South-Western region. In contrast, in the central region, Comporta, the variation between S. genistoides and U. australis communities is explained mainly by aridity and temperature seasonality, followed by the individualistic responses of the dominant species and soil organic matter. Overall, these results indicate that, the relative importance of the main factors causing community-level responses varies according to regional processes and the suitability of the environmental conditions for the dominant species in these communities. These responses are also determined by intrinsic community mechanisms that result in a high degree of similarity in the gradient-driven community stages in different regions., This work was funded by the projects COMDUNES (EXPL/BIA-BIC/2311/2013, Portuguese FCT) and SCENIC (PID2019-106840GB-C21, Spanish MCIN/ AEI/10.13039/501100011033). SC was supported by the FCT grant
(SFRH/BD/65659/2009) and the FCT PORBIOTA project through a postdoctoral fellowship. RMC was supported by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie (Grant agreement N° 894941); AMCS by a “Ramón y Cajal” Fellowship (RYC2020-029407-I) of the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación., Peer reviewed




A database of dung beetle trait values from a transect between the Mediterranean and the Sahara

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • deCastro-Arrazola, Indradatta
  • Sánchez-Piñero, Francisco
  • Moretti, Marco
  • Hortal, Joaquín
This work provides open access to the data compiled for the following paper Indradatta deCastro-Arrazola, Francisco Sánchez-Piñero, Marco Moretti & Joaquín Hortal. Spatial and seasonal trait selection in dung beetle assemblages along an aridity gradient in the Sahara, currently under review. See the original paper for more details., This database provides average trait measurements for dung beetles surveyed a c. 400 km linear transect following a strong aridity gradient parallel to the Morocco-Algerian border from the semiarid Mediterranean coast in the North towards the hyperarid (i.e. extremely dry) conditions of the Sahara toward the South (see deCastro-Arrazola et al. PeerJ 2018). All morphological traits were measured with a Leica M165C microscope, using Leica Application Suite LAS V4.0 with the Z-builder module to process the images and obtain the measurements. Not all traits could be measured in all 61 species sampled in the study. Adult trophic preferences and dung relocation strategy for feeding purposes (both qualitative traits) were obtained from the literature and expert knowledge. For these categorical traits, values could be assigned with confidence to all species. For continuous traits, we aimed at measuring 10 individuals per species, and finally 80% of species had measures for 5 or more individuals due to the limited numbers of individuals in the samples. The individuals measured for each species were chosen from as many localities as possible to maximise intraspecific trait variation, covering their distribution along the gradient. In total, we measured 23 traits on 347 individuals (mean 5.8 and median 5.0 individuals per species) leading to a total of more than 7000 measurements, complemented with further categorical traits gathered from literature or our own observations in the field., I. deCastro-Arrazola was funded by a FPI grant from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (BES-2012-054353). Surveys and data processing were supported by the Spanish Agency of Innovation (AEI) project SCARPO (grant CGL2011-29317). This work is part of AEI project SCENIC (PID2019-106840GB-C21/AEI/10.13039/501100011033).", Peer reviewed




Forest conversion into pasture selects dung beetle traits at different biological scales depending on species pool composition

Digital.CSIC. Repositorio Institucional del CSIC
  • Bruno Pessôa, Marcelo
  • Souza do Amaral,Tatiana
  • De Marco Júnior, Paulo
  • Hortal, Joaquín
The conversion of forests into open areas has large effects on the diversity and structure of native communities. The intensity of these effects may vary between regions, depending on the existence of native species adapted to open habitats in the regional pool or the time since habitat change., We assess the differences in species richness and functional diversity of dung beetle communities (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae) between native forests and novel pasturelands of the Atlantic Forest and the Cerrado, two biomes with contrasting histories of human occupation in Brazil. We conducted standardized surveys
in seven forest fragments and adjacent pastures in each region and measured 14 traits in individuals collected in each type of habitat at each particular site. We calculated functional richness, functional evenness, functional divergence, and community-weighted mean of traits for each area, and analyzed individual variation through nested variance decomposition and Trait Statistics., Communities were richer and more numerous at the Cerrado. We did not find any consistent relationship between functional diversity and forest conversion beyond the changes in species diversity. Although landscape changes were more recent at the Cerrado, the colonization of the new habitat by native species already adapted to open habitats lessens the functional loss in this biome. This indicates that habitat change's effects on trait diversity depend on the regional species pool rather than on time since land conversion., Forest conversion effects were primarily due to internal filtering. The effects of external filtering only appear at the intraspecific variance level, with contrasting differences between the Cerrado, where traits related to relocation behavior and size are selected, and the Atlantic Forest, where selection operates for traits
related to relocation behavior and flight. These results evidence the importance of considering individual variance to address the responses of dung beetle communities to forest conversion., This work was supported by the projects “Predicting diversity variations across scales through process-based
models linking community ecology and biogeography” (CNPq PVE 314523/2014-6), and SCENIC –“ Scaling the effects of niche and interaction dynamics on the ecological and evolutionary outcomes of coexistence”
(PID2019-106840GB-C21,funded by AEI/FEDER,UE). MBP was supported by CAPES grants PROEX-0487
and 88881.135489/2016-01, and FAM by CAPES Postdoctoral scholarship 120147/2016-01. PDMJ research is funded by CNPq (grant 308694/2015-5). This paper is a contribution of the INCT in Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity Conservation founded by MCTIC/CNPq/FAPEG (grant 465610/2014-5)., Peer reviewed